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Full text of "Town of Wilmington Annual Report"

HOW WILMINGTON'S TAX RATE COMPARES WITH OTHER TOWNS 



TOWN 


1950 


I960 


\A/ii ^/llM^"^^^M 
WILIvllNb 1 UN 


5600 


64,00 


NORTH ANDOVER 


43.00 


54.00 


NATICK 


45.60 


63.00 


DANVERS 


49.00 


68.00 


NEEDHAM 


38.00 


5800 


READING 


43.00 


6450 


LEXINGTON 


43.00 


68.00 


BRAINTREE 


44.00 


69.10 


STONEHAM 


50.00 


76,00 


WAYLAND 


49.00 


78.00 


CHFI MSFORD 


53.00 


87.00 


SAUGUS 


4L00 


76.40 


CONCORD 


53.00 


93.00 


TEWKSBURY 


40.00 


83.00 


BILLERICA 


3400 


97.00 



INCREASE IN TAX RATES 1950-1960 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



I 



^^^^ 

\^ TAX RATE ANALYSIS 

1950 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 

Assessed Valuation 7,865,913.00 15,341,686.00 16,774,982.00 19,228,670.00 23,855,002.25 24,269,675.00 

Tax Levy 440,491.13 895,593.73 1,059,522.87 1,275,344.22 1,533,156.14 1,553,259.00 

Tax Rate 56.00 58,00 62.80 66.00 64.00 64.00 



Net Cost from Taxes: 

Schools 135,293.70 469,616.09 585,822.89 650,71 1.00 804,669.00 887,137.00 

^ Town Government 275,723.43 405,782.67 447,569.02 599,247.66 692,625.92 641,844.11 

I State, County Agencies 28, 474. 00 20, 194. 98 26, 130. 96 25, 385. 56 35. 931. 61 24, 277. 89 



TOTAL TAX LEVY 440,491,13 895,593.73 1,059.522.87 1,275,344.22 1,533,226.53 1,553.259.00 

School Tax Rate 17.20(30.7%) 30,61 (52.3%) 34.75 (55,0%) 33.68( 51.02%) 33.59(52.49%) 36,56(57,12%) 

Town Tax Rate 35,20(63.0%) 26.07(45.9%) 26.50(42.6%) 31.01( 46.99%) 28.91 (45.17%) 26,44(41,32%) 

State. County Tax Rate 3,60(6,3%) 1.32(2.3%) 1.55(2.4%) 1.31{ 1.99%) 1.50( 2.34%) 1.00( 1,56%) 

TOTAL TAX RATE $56,00 $58,00 $62,80 $66,00 $64.00 $64,00 



INDEX 



132 



Page 



Accepted Streets 58 

Animal Inspector 52 

Board of Appeals 26 

Board of Assessors 16 

Board of Health 46 

Board of Public Welfare 53 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Boards, Committees, and Commissions 8 

Building By-law Committee 30 

Building Inspector 31 

Carter (Sarah D. J. ) Lecture Fund 45 

Cemetery Commissioners 43 

Constable 21 

Directory of Officials 6 

Dog Officer 23 

Elections: Presidential Primary (4/26/60) 97 

State Primary (9/13/60) 102 

Election (11/8/60) 109 

Fire Department 34 

Fire Department Personnel 71 

Highway Department 40 

Housing Authority 56 

Jury List 66 

Library T rustee s 44 

Permanent Building Committee 38 

Planning Board 22 

Plans for the Future 5 

Police Department 32 

Police Department Personnel 70 

Progress - I960 4 

Recreation Commission 25 

Registrars of Voters 15 

School Committee 73 

School Maintenance Department 82 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 57 

Superintendent of Schools 75 

Town Accountant 120 

Town Clerk 14 

Town Collector 12 

Town Counsel 18 

Town Engineer 24 

Town Manager 9 

Town Meetings: Annual Town Meeting - Mar. 5, I960 85 

Special Town Meeting - Sept. 19, I960 106 

Special Town Meeting -Nov. 28. I960 113 

Special Town Meeting (Adjourned) - Dec. 5, I960 116 

Warrant Annual Town Meeting - Mar. 4, 1961 117 

Town Treasurer 11 

Tree Department 35 

Veterans' Agent 65 

Water Department 36 

Wilmington's Skating Star - Jeanne Ashworth 10 

Front Cover - St. Thomas Catholic Church (upper left) 

St. Dorothy's Catholic Church (lower right) 




^^^^ 
Town of Wilmington 

Massachusetts 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

It would be wise for the citizens of Wilmington to make a personal re-assessment of their 
community; and to re-evaluate for themselves the unique privilege, which is theirs, to 
take such an immediate part in the conduct of their own local affairs. 

This is no time for public apathy. 



Tremendous changes have taken place in the life of this community during the past ten 
years. More drastic changes are ahead. The expansion of the "fifties" was due to popu- 
lation surges from outside the community; the changes of the "sixties" must originate with 
our own people, within our own town. 

This will require wisdom, vision, and sound judgment; it will demand not only the efficient 
operation of the town government, but also the intelligent, effective, and whole-hearted 
cooperation of the townspeople, themselves. 



New schools, expanded municipal services, better roads - these are costly. But they 
can be had, if the citizens of the town are prepared to pay the price - not necessarily in 
dollars - but in a cooperative effort to attract new enterprise and diversified industry as 
an expanded base of tax revenue. 

To reduce a national need to more modest and familiar proportions, it must not be "What 
the Town Can Do for Us" but rather, what we, as individuals, can do for the community 
at large. 

Our "NEW FRONTIERS" are here at home. 

Respectfully submitted. 
Board of Selectmen 



Nicholas L. DeFelice, Chairman 
Charles H. Black 
John D. Brooks 
Wavie M. Drew 
Donald C. Kidder 



progress 



WHAT WE DID IN I960 



. construction of Boutwell Street School. 

■ initiated program for our police officers to receive training at State Police Academy. The two men 
that we sent finished at the top of their class. 

. developed our sidewalk program, and purchased sidewalk roller and sidewalk plow. 

. completed and moved into our new Police Station. 

. completed and moved into our new Public Works Garage. 

. completed and moved into our new Public Health Laboratory. 

. over $ 1 , 000, 000 of new assessed valuation. 

• industrial expansion continues with several new industries intending to locate in Wilmington in 1961. 
.increased facilities at Silver Lake. 
. resurfaced twenty miles of streets. 
. construction of Concord Street. 

.drainage on Adams Street, North Street, Grove Avenue, Shawsheen Avenue, Burlington Avenue, 
Pineridge Road, Carolyn Road and Pinewood Road. 

.new equipment purchased: two police cruisers, rotomist sprayer for Tree Department, automobile 
for the Welfare Department, three trucks for the Highway, Fire, and School Maintenance Department! 

. paved several avenues in the cemetery. 

voted $1, 050, 000 for new Intermediate School in North Wilmington to be ready for occupancy in 
September, 1962. 



4 



the job ahead 



WHAT WE PLAN FOR THE FUTURE 



. continue efforts to attract new industry. 

. initiate tree planting program. 

.construct Pineridge Road. 

construct Carolyn Road . 

. provide new Town Hall facilities. 

.adopt revised building code. 

develop wells at new wellfield site. 

. mechanize town bookkeeping system. 

. continue procedure to correct street drainage problems. 

. continue our expanded street program. 

. continue our program for proper street lighting. 

.initiate and develop municipal owned and operated sanitary landfill operation for disposal of rubbish, 
continue our sidewalk program. 
. erect street signs for renamed streets. 
. widen and reconstruct Boutwell Street 
.dredge, widen, and relocate the Ipswich River 



5 



DIRECTORY 



OF 



OFFICIALS 



1960 



Term 
Expire 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Nicholas L. DeFelice, Chairman 

John D. Brooks 

Wavie M. Drew 

Charles H. Black 

Donald C. Kidder 

Olive M. Sheldon, Clerk 

(Francis J. Hagerty, Resigned) 



1961 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1963 



TOWN MANAGER 



Cecil O. Lancaster 



TOWN MODERATOR 



Simon Cutter 



(annually) 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Henry Sullivan, Chairman 

Ernest M. Crispo, Vice Chairman 

George G. Robertie, Secretary 

Robert F. Hastings 

Edward F. Page 

John F. Hartnett 

(Arthur V. Lynch, Resigned) 



1961 
1963 
1961 
1962 
1962 
1963 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



Harold S. Shea 

(John J. Collins, Resigned) 



U. S. SENATORS: 



Leverett Saltonstall of Dover 
Benjamin A. Smith II of Gloucester 



U. S. REPRESENTATIVE: 



F. Bradford Morse of Lowell 



STATE SENATOR: 



James J. Long 

7th Middlesex District 

14 Plympton St. , Woburn 



STATE REPRESENTATIVES: 



Frank D. Tanner 

18th Middlesex District 

24 Federal Street, Readinc 



Thomas F. Donahue 
18 Middlesex District 
75 Pine Street, Woburn 



6 



OFFICERS 



DEPARTMENT 



HEADS 



Accountant 
Animal Inspector 
Building Inspector 
Cemetery Superintendent 
Civil Defense Director 
Constable s 

Director of Public Welfare 

Dog Officer 

Engineer 

Fence Viewer 

Fire Chief 

Highway Superintendent 
Librarian 

Maintenance Superintendent 

Medical Agent, Board of Health 

Milk Inspector 

Moth Superintendent 

Nurse, Public Health 

Nurse, School 

Nurse, School 

Physicians, School 

Plumbing Inspector 

Police Chief 

Public Health Officer 

Sealer Weights &£ Measures 

Slaughtering Inspector 

Town Clerk 

Town Clerk (Assistant) 
Town Collector 
Town Counsel 
Town Treasurer 
Tree Warden 
Veterans Agent 
Veterans Grave Officer 
Water Superintendent 
Wire Inspector 



Gerald Fagan, M. D. 



Robert H. Peters 
Leo E. LeBlanc 
Minot J. Anderson 
Francis Downs 
Rene J. LaRivee 
Harry Ainsworth, A. John Imbim_/o 
Walter Coleman 
Leo E. LeBlanc 
Alphonse Savignac 
Maurice O'Neil 
Arthur J. Boudreau 
James H. White 
Clara P. Chipman 
Anton Thiel 
Gerald Fagan, M. D. 
Patrick A. Thibeau 
John W. Babine 
Ann Butters, R .N. 

Helen E. Martin, R.N. 
Sylvia Levine, R.N. 
Ernest C. MacDougall, M. D. 
Herbert W. Pickering 
Paul J. Lynch 
Patrick A. Thibeau 
Alphonse Savignac 
Leo E. LeBlanc 
Esther L. Russell 
Sylvia Bowman 
Miriam H. Ware 
Philip B. Buzzell 

Grace H. Tilley 
John W. Babine 
Arthur Harper 
Guy E. Nichols 
Edmund H. Sargent 
Charles Webster 



ADVISORY COMMITTEES TO THE TOWN M ANAGER 



BUILDING BY-LAW 

Roland Wood, Chairman 
Raymond F. Fitzmaurice 
Garnet Mills 



PERSONNEL ADVISORY 
John Brooks, Chairman 
Albert Blackburn, Jr. 
Paul Duggan 
Carl Gubellini 



Os 



7 



BOARDS. COMMITTEES, AND COMMISSIONS 



APPEAL, BOARD OF 
Louis E. Gage, Chairman 
Bruce MacDonald 
Parker E. Hodgdon 
C. Homer Coursey, Associate 
Henry R. Hesse, Associate 
(AlmericoT. DiCampo, resigned) 

ASSESSORS, BOARD OF 

Stanley Webber, Principal Assessor 

Olive M. Sheldon 

Maurice D. O'Neil 

CARTER LECTURE FUND COMMITTEE 
Guy E. Nichols 
Mildred E. Neilson 
Helen P. Hayward 
Madelon C. Slater 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 
Joseph B. McMahon, Chairman 
William F. Cavanaugh 
Guy E. Nichols 

ELECTION OFFICERS 



Term 
Expire s 

1961 
1963 
1962 
1961 
1961 



Harold E. Melzar, Warden 
Stanley Webber, Deputy Warden 
Simon Cutter, Clerk 
Frances R. Cleveland, Deputy Clerk 
Mildred A. Dolan, Inspector 
Olive M. Sheldon, Inspector 
Florence Balkus, Deputy Inspector 
Elizabeth Cavanaugh, Deputy Inspector 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Herbert C. Barrows, Honorary for Life 

William P. Curtin, Chairman 

Robert B. Michelson, Vice Chairman 

Carl E. Gubellini, Secretary 

Cornelius F. Joyce 

William A. Stickney 

John G. Hayward 

Dr. John P. Silvers 

George W. Boylen, Jr. 

Ralph H. Biggar 

(John D. Brooks, resigned) 

HEALTH, BOARD OF 



1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 



1962 
1961 
1963 



1961 
1961 
1961 
1961 
1961 
1961 
1961 
1961 



1961 
1963 
1963 
1961 
1961 
1962 
1962 
1962 
1963 



Augustus C. Walker, Chairman 1962 
Marion C. Boylen 1961 
Erving S. Pfau 1963 
Patrick Thibeau, Public Health Officer 
(Vinal E. Lewis, resigned) 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

William F. Smith, Chairman 1961 
Ernest B. Rice, Vice Chairman 1965 
M. Flora Kasabuski, Secretary 1961 
James P. Donahue, Treasurer 1962 
Edward Sullivan, State Member 1963 
(Frank H. McLean, resigned) 
(Alan E. Fenton, State Member, resigned) 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 
Frankline E. Allen, Chairman 
Evelyn Norton 
May Hadley 
Marjorie M. Emery 
Philip B. Buzzell 
Elizabeth N. Neilson 
(Esther C. Hall, resigned) 

PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Erwin Hanke, Chairman 

Paul H. Niles, Secretary 

Raymond G. McClure 

Vincent R. McLain 

Joseph F. Courtney 

PLANNING BOARD 



William A. Beers, Chairman 

Raymond Fitzmaurice , Secretary 

Joseph Slater 

James F. Banda 

A. Daniel Gillis 

Herbert Nickerson 

John R . Evans 

(Howard C. Woolaver, reaicfnefi) 

RECREATION COMMISSION 
Maybelle A. Bliss, Chairman 
Lawrence H. Gushing, Director 
Carl A. Backman 
Donald F. Hebsch 
Edward M. Nichols 
Norbert L. Sell 

REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 
Joseph P. Ring, Chairman 
F. Talbot Emery 
Phyllis O'Leary 
Esther L. Russell, Clerk 

TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 
Philip B. Buzzell, Chairman 
Harold E. Melzar 
Edward M. Neilson 



Term 
Expire s 

1961 
1961 
1962 
1962 
1963 
1963 



1963 
1963 
1961 
1961 
1962 



1963 
1962 
1961 
1962 
1964 
1964 
1965 



1961 
1963 
1962 



1963 
1961 
1962 



WATER h SEWER COMMISSIONERS, BOARD OF 
Harold E. Melzar, Chairman 1963 
Waldo A. Stevens 1961 
Arnold C. Blake 1962 

WELFARE, BOARD OF PUBLIC 
Maurice D. O'Neil, Chairman 
Florence A. Balkus 

Anna M. Low 1961 
Walter F. Coleman, Director & Secretary 
(Andrew P. Ring, Director & Secretary, resigned) 




J 



Town Manager, Cecil O. Lancaster 

To the Citizens of Wilmington: >i 

Q 

It is with pleasure that I present the I960 Annual Report of the Town of Wilmington covering the 5 
tenth year of operation vmder the Town Manager form of government. 

Your I960 tax dollar supported a year of care fully -planned municipal improvements. Despite ris ing ^2 

osts, the Town of Wilmington was able to complete a variety of important capital-improvement projects with- [c 

out an increase in the tax rate. ji i 

I ? 

In all of its efforts to improve Wilmington, your town government was "cost conscious". To under- ^^ 
;ake these improvements, and to continue all the established services which the community expects to enjoy, 
without an increase in taxes, are major accomplishments. This was not the work of a single individual. £ 
5uch benefits are achieved only through the cooperative efforts of all town employees and officers. E 

Therefore, I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the Board of Selectmen, to the conscientious ^ 
onpaid municipal boards, and to our loyal town employees. Without their continuing cooperation and interest, 
his could not have been possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Cecil O. Lancaster 
Town Manager 



9 



Jeanne Ashworth 

In an age of motion, Wilmington's twin symbols of speed are the Avco nose cone 
and Jeanne Ashworth. 

Sometime in the next decade, a giant U. S. missile, tipped by a friction impervious 
Avco nose cone, may well lead the way to Mars or some other far distant planet. 

In the meantime, Jeanne is setting a pace far too speedy for the rest of the world's 
women skaters to match. 

The past year has been a triumphant one for her, as she raced to one victory after 
another, bringing athletic reknown to Wilmington and her skating club associates. 

It used to be that Wilmington, Del. was known as the headquarters of the giant 
Dupont empire; now it's Wilmington, Mass. , the home of Jeanne Ashworth. 

To borrow a phrase from the local Boswell, Jeanne is now the Bobby Jones of the 
skating world. She's the only girl in the U. S. skating history to hold the "Big Four" titles 
at the same time. 

In the past year she won both the National Indoor and Outdoor Speed Championships; 
and the North American Outdoor and Indoor Speed Championships. 

In addition, she won an Olympic bronze medal for the United States by finishing 
third in the 500 Metres at the Winter Olympics. In that performance she defeated two of 
Russia's best skaters, including Tamara Rylova, the world record holder. 

In that performance, she so won the affection and admiration of the Soviet athletes 
that she now ranks as one of America's top goodwill ambassadors. 

But that will not dull her incentive in international competition. Her next goal is 
the World Championship. 



10 



town treasurer 




TOWN TREASURER 
Mrs. Grace H. Tilley 



Cash in Treasury January 1, I960 
Total Receipts I960 

Less Payments by Treasury Warrant 
Cash in Treasury January 1, 1961 

WiL M/NG TOAy'5 /960 



$ 443,778.80 
4, 227, 954. 81 
4, 671, 733. 61 
4, 332, 992. 49 

$ 338, 741. 12 

Budget 



Income 

CofiP Tax 0.7"% 




Expenses 

UfJCiASSir/ro ( RescRvc 



All Om£fi Town 







O^e^iA r 





€.6 



All OrMer/f Oterj 
5cf¥ooi Desr 



e .e •/. 




\\ 

c : 

= 

c 



'/AJCiuocs • PaoncTio/v or Pcpsons / P/fopePTt, Puaiic 

WOlTKt. GCHlffAl QOVT., HtAlTM f ■SaMIT^TIO/V , 

Liaftar t Ptca. 



11 




town eollecftor; 



Balance 
12/31/59 



Commitments 
1960 



Collected 



Abatements Refunds 



Tax 
Title 



Bala 
12/3 



Various Commit. 
1957 and prior yrs. 



541. 98 



1958 
Poll 

Personal 
Excise 
Real Estate 

1959 
Poll 

Personal 
Excise 
Real Estate 

I960 
Poll 

Per sonal 
Excise 
Farm Excise 
Real Estate 



Water Liens 



1958 
1959 
1960 



Betterments 
1958 

Deferred Water 
Comm. Interest 



Apport. Water 
Comm. Interest 



90. 00 
655. 54 
1, 749. 45 
15, 515. 78 



200. 00 
5, 992. 80 
12,477.50 42,715.96 
77,936. 31 



6, 730. 00 
69, 429. 76 
♦167, 159. 30 
259. 04 
1, 554, 644. 20 
* 26, 685. 99 
in Dec. '60 



281. 80 
1, 393. 19 



5, 598. 86 



21. 36 

85. 15 
91. 52 



30. 


00 


18. 


00 








J J ~j , 




46. 


20 








468. 


76 


573. 


25 








12, 525. 


06 


342. 


05 


3. 


33 


2, 652. 00 


100. 


00 


36. 


00 








3, 956. 


64 


1. 357. 


76 








42, 789. 


20 


9, 481. 


33 


1,992. 


53 




57, 769. 


17 


1, 029. 


86 


760. 


08 


2, 820. 48 


5, 576. 


00 


932. 


00 


12. 


00 




62, 894. 


80 


1, 506. 


24 


97. 


28 




1 15, 758. 


26 


1 1, 494. 


75 


4, 876. 


09 




195. 


78 


6. 


25 








1, 422, 353. 


55 


60, 334. 


64 


8, 193 


29 


9, 488. 00 


223. 


16 










58. 64 


1, 144. 


15 










21. 00 


4, 343. 


26 






18. 


50 


452. 83 


21. 


36 












55. 90 










29. 25 


68. 


24 










23. 28 



4, 

17, 



5. 
44, 



70, 6i 



22 
82 



Apport. Street 
Comm. Interest 



111. 77 
78. 59 



111. 77 
78. 59 



12 



Betterments 
1959 

Apport. Water 
Comm. Interest 

Apport. Street 
Comm. Interest 



jjnapport. Water 
1960 

•Apport. Water 
3omm. Interest 

\pport. Street 
3omm. Interest 

I 

\pport. Water 
)aid in full 
3omm. Interest 



Balance 
12/31/59 



447. 04 
501. 50 

237. 84 
176. 76 

44, 442. 98 



Commitment s 
I960 



4, 600. 95 
2, 893. 88 

1, 012. 11 
695. 99 



2, 430. 76 
35. 42 



Collected 



232. 10 
278. 70 

206. 74 
152. 68 

1, 748. 06 



3, 488. 00 
2, 064. 66 

860. 23 
586. 67 



2, 430. 76 
35. 42 



Abatements Refunds 



34. 42 



605. 23 



. 54 



26. 55 



Tax 
Title 



29. 11 
22. 12 



Balance 
12/31/60 



151.41 
200. 68 

31. 64 
24. 08 



Apportioned I960 
Real Est. Tax bills 

60.89 1,078.61 
42.86 786.36 



15. 82 
1 1. 39 



136. 06 
97. 93 



vpport. Street 
■aid in full 
".omm. Interest 

'napport. Water 



itere st 

femand Charges 
TOTAL 

Lien Certificates 
Advertising Charges 



1, 651. 01 
21.75 

4, 559. 65 



1, 654. 41 
21. 75 

837. 74 



3, 018. 68 
2, 346. 20 



$1,864,438.64 $1,751,503.52 
1, 226. 00 
32. 25 



221. 50 



3. 40 



3, 500. 41 
To be apportioned 1961 
Real Estate Tax Bills 




TOWN COLLECTOR 
Mrs. Miriam H. Ware 



13 



lowii 4*lerk 




Vital Statistics - Chapter 46, General Laws as Amended: 

BIRTHS - final figure for 1959 - Three hundred and seventy- seven (377) 

BIRTHS - actually recorded to date in I960 - Three hxindred and forty-six (346) 
(This figure will be increased when the final reports are in) 

MARRIAGE INTENTIONS - recorded in I960 - One hundred and ten (110) 

MARRIAGES - recorded in I960 - One hundred and twenty-three (123) 

DEATHS - recorded in I960 - Eighty-nine (89) 

Chapter 46, Section 15: 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians and registered hospital medical officers 
applying therefor, blanks for the return of births as required by law. 

Chapter 114, Section 45: 

Forty (40) Burial Permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent for the Board of Health. 
Town Records: 

PERMITS AND CERTIFICATES OF REGISTRATION FOR THE STORAGE OF INFLAMMABLES: 
These licenses must be registered by the owner or occupant of the land, or by the holder of the license in | 
the Town Clerk's office on or before April 30 of each year. Notification will be sent on or about March H 
If not registered as required by law, the license may be revoked by the licensing authority, after a public 
hearing. Sixty-four (64) permits or new licenses were recorded in I960. 



14 



registrars of voters 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3, of the Town By-laws, meetings of the Board of Registrars 
are held on the second Monday of each month for the registration and conduct of business. Under Chapter 
626 of the Acts of 1958, this meeting is open to the public and the press, and it is so posted in the Town 
Hall. 



Women married prior to January 1 must re-register under their marriage name, 
citizens must have their naturalization papers with them when registering. 



Naturalized 



New residents are requested to notify the Board of Registrars of the date which they take residence 
in the town. Any change of address within the town during the year should be brought to the attention of 
the Board so that your name will not be removed from the voting list in error. 

In order to keep the voting list as up to date as possible, this board annually compares the voting 
list with the yearly street listing. If a voter's name does not appear on the street listing, it is subject to 
.removal from the voting register. 



November I960 registered voters: Democrats - 1198, Republicans - 947, Independents - 3669, 
Total registered voters - 5814. 



Annual Census I960 12,764 



Federal Census I960 12,430 




J 

-J 

53 
Ec 

6 3 

r? 

c : 

0: 



PRINCIPAL ASSESSOR | 
Stanley Webber ' 



15 



board of assessors 



RECAPITULATION - I960 



Total Appropriations (Taxation) 

Total Appropriations (Available Funds) 

Tax Title Foreclosures 

Amount necessary to satisfy final court judgments 
Overlay Deficits (Overdrafts) 
Total Deficits (Abatements) 
Pension Fund 

Amount certified to Treasurer for Tax Takings (Overdraft) 
State Parks and Reservation 
State Audit 
County Tax 

Tuberculosis Hospital Assessment 
Overlay 

Gross Amount to be Raised 



$2, 076, 338. 50 
104, 023. 86 
216. 00 

1, 443. 97 
24, 586. 60 

5, 053. 26 
19. 485. 30 
87. 00 
3, 116. 97 
120. 16 
18, 1 19. 50 

2, 921. 26 
42. 855. 09 



2, 180, 362. 36 



1 15, 005. 1 1 
2, 295, 367. 47 



Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 



Income Tax 


155, 531. 


48 


Corporation Taxes 


18, 655. 


95 


Reimbursement Publicly Owned Land 


66. 


96 


Old Age Tax (Meals) 


2, 726. 


58 


Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 


136, 342. 


87 


License s 


4, 000. 


00 


Special Assessments 


3, 300. 


00 


General Government 


5, 090. 


00 


Protections of Persons and Property 


5, 217. 


00 


Health and Sanitation 


2, 070. 


00 


Charitie s 


16, 878. 


00 


Old Age Assistance 


39, 509. 


00 


Veterans' Services 


8, 460. 


00 


Schools 


45, 185. 


00 


Librarie s 


653. 


00 


Cemeterie s 


3, 219. 


00 


Interest on Taxes and Assessments 


5, 632. 


00 


State Assistance for School Construction 


77, 176. 


49 


Farm Animal Excise 


240. 


00 


Unclassified 


2, 282. 


00 


Sewer Bonds and Interest 


27, 504. 


00 


Total Estimated Receipts 






Overestimate d£ previous year (County Hospital Assessment) 


1, 894. 08 


State Parks and Reservations 


348. 


44 


Voted from Available Funds 


104, 023. 


86 



Total Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 
Net Amount to be Raised by Taxation 



559. 739.33 



106. 266. 38 
666, 055.71 
1, 629, 361. 76 
2, 295, 367. 47 



Personal Property 1, 084, 540 @ 64. 00 per M 

Real Estate 24, 269, 675 @ 64. 00 per M 

Polls 3, 346 @ 2. 00 each 

Total Taxes Levied on Polls and Property 

16 



69, 410. 56 
1, 553, 259. 20 
6, 692. 00 
1, 629. 361. 76 



TABLE OF AGGREGATES FOR WILMINGTON 
OF POLLS, PROPERTY AND TAXES, AS ASSESSED 
JANUARY 1, I960 



Compiled from the figures entered in the Valuation List: 



Number of Persons Assessed: 



Individuals 
19 
3938 
188 



On Personal Estate Only 
On Real Estate Only 
On Both Personal and Real Estate 
Total Number of Persons Assessed 
Total Number of Polls Assessed 

Value of Assessed Personal Estate: 
Stock in Trade 
Machinery 
Live Stock 

All Other Tangible Personal Property 

Total Value of Assessed Personal Estate 

Value of Assessed Real Estate: 

Land exclusive of Buildings 
Buildings exclusive of Land 

Total Value of Assessed Real Estate 

Total Valuation of Assessed Estate 

Tax Rate per $1, 000 - $64. 00 

Taxes for State, County and Town purposes, including Overlay: 
On Personal Estate 
On Real Estate 
On Polls 

Total Taxes Assessed 
Number of Livestock Assessed: 



Horses ( 1 yr. old or over) 
Neat Cattle ( 1 yr. old or over) 

Cows (Milch) 
Bulls 1, Oxen 0, Steers 0, Heifers 12 
Swine ( 6 mos. old or over) 
Sheep ( 6 mos. old or over) 
Fowl 
All Other 

Number of Acres of Land Assessed: 



All 
Other 
37 
204 
22 



General 
~"48 

19 
13 
283 
8 
90 

50, 805 



Number of Dwelling Houses Assessed 



Total 
56 
4142 
210 
4408 
3346 



1 102,340.00 
150, 114. 00 
39, 766.00 
792, 320.00 

1, 084, 540.00 



3, 009, 365.00 
21, 260, 310. 00 

24, 269, 675. 00 

25, 354, 215. 00 



69, 410. 56 
1, 553, 259. 20 
6, 692. 00 

1, 275, 344. 22 

Farm Animals 
Assessed 



63 
22 

1255 
20 
5850 
14, 669 

10, 340 

3, 383 



J 



5J 
c 

c 



17 



town counsel 



In accordance with the requirements of the Town By-laws, I submit herewith my report as Town 
Counsel covering the year I960. 

A. On January 1, I960, there were pending the following actions by or against the Town (exclusiv 
of actions in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, and of tax 
lien foreclosure proceedings in the Land Court): 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell. (Action of contract by City of 
Lowell to recover the sum of $275. 96 for special vocational training of certain pupils ) 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell. (Action of contract by City of 
Lowell to recover $657. 77 plus interest for aid furnished in a public welfare case.) 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell. (Action of contract by City of 
Lowell to recover $721. 90 for aid furnished in a public welfare case. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. A Certain Defendant, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Action 
of contract under G. L. Chap. 117, Sec. 5. ) 

Jacob Levine & Sons v. Town of Wilmington, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Action 
of contract to recover burial expense. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Edward N. Gadsby et als, Commissioners of Department of Public Utilities 
and Boston and Maine Railroad Company, Supreme Judicial Court, Suffolk County. (Petition to review 
certain rulings and orders of the Department of Public Utilities in connection with protection at the Middle- 
sex Avenue Grade Crossing of the Boston and Maine Railroad. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Julia Godzyk, Administratrix of the Estate of Andrew Klebasz Fourth Dis- 
trict Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Action of contract to recover amounts expended by the Town for 
support and hospital treatment of decedent. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Wendell Phillips, Middlesex Probate Court. (Petition to enforce obligation 
to support. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Irving L. White, Middlesex Probate Court. (Petition to enforce obligation 
to support.) 

Towne Land Development, Inc. v. Wilmington Planning Board Middlesex Superior Court. (Appeal 
in equity from action of Planning Board disapproving a proposed sub-division. Complaint entered in Court 
but no subpoena served on Town. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Percy G. Crocker, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin 
removal of gravel. ) 

Wilmington Board of Health v. Nagel Stone, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin 
occupancy of substandard dwelling). 



Town of Wilmington v. Joseph DeCota, Jr. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Pro- 



ceeding to enforce obligation to support. ) 



18 




New England Gas Products, Inc. v. Board of Appeal, Middlesex Superior Court. (Three separate 
appeals from refusal of building permit. ) 

John F. Hartnett et als v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition in equity by 
ten taxpayers to compel the making of additional school appropriations by the Town. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Allstate Sand & Gravel Co. and Pleasant Homes, Inc. Middlesex Superior 
Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for 
assessment of damages in taking for state highway. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Stephen P. Hathaway et als, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to 
enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) 

Inhabitants of Town of Wilmington v. Edward G. Moody ScSons, Inc. et als. Fourth District Court 
of Eastern Middlesex. (Action to recover amounts paid for repair of brush fire truck. ) 

Edward G. Moody & Son Inc. v. Inhabitants of Town of Wilmington, Arthur J. Boudreau and 
Fred F. Cain, Inc. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Action to recover for repairs to brush 
fire truck. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Frederick & Ethel Smith et al, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to 
enjoin removal of gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Alice C. and William A. Dias and Campanella & Cardi Construction Co. 
Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin removal of gravel. ) 

Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington v. James F. Donahue et al. Land Court. (Proceeding to 
[Secure verification of Planning Board's action in rescinding approval of part of subdivision plan. ) 

Paul Bongiorno et ux v. County of Middlesex and Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Petition for assessment of damages in land taking. ) 

Wright & Pierce v. Town of Wilmington, United States District Court. (Action for breach of 
contract. ) 

j Doris Weinstein v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for assessment of 

(damages for taking of land near North Wilmington Station for public parking area. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. William Baldwin et als. Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin 
removal of sand and gravel.) 

Town of Wilmington v. Stephen P. Hathaway and George E. Dunn. Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill 
.n equity to enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for 
assessment of damages in land taking. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Francis X. Lang et als. Commissioners of Department of Public Utilities, 
Supreme Judicial Court. (Appeal to the Supreme Judicial Court from the order of the Department of Public 



Utilities permitting certain reductions of passenger service by the Boston & Maine Railroad. ) 

John J. and Mary T. Hayes v. Coxmty of Middlesex, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for assess- 
nent of damages in land taking. ) 

19 



I 



Frank &; Johanna M. Hingston v. Inhabitants of Town of Wilmington. Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Petition for assessnnent of damages in land taking. ) 

Mildred Tentindo v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Tort action to recover for 
personal injuries. ) 

City of Boston v. Town of Wilmington, Suffolk Superior Court. (Action to recover for hospital care 
for resident of Wilmington. ) 

Campanella &; Cardi Construction Co. v. Alfred Calabrese, Middlesex Superior Court. (Tort 
action for malicious interference with contract and obstructing way. ) 

B. (1). During the year I960 the following new actions were brought by or on behalf of the Town: 

Town of Wilmington v. Poorvu Construction Co. , Middlesex Superior Court. (Action of contract for 
damages on account of defects in heating system of Wildwood School). 

Town of Wilmington v. City of Maiden, Middlesex Superior Court. (Action to recover reimburse- 
ment for welfare payments). 

Town of Wilmington v. John Benevento, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin remova'. 
of gravel.) 

Town of Wilmington v. George Vokey, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin removal 
of gravel.) 

B. (2). During the year I960 the following new actions were brought against the Town or its 
officers or agents: 

Poorvu Construction Co. v. Inhabitants of Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Action 
of contract to recover balance withheld on Wildwood School). 

John McSheffrey, Petitioner v. Inhabitants of Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Petition for assessment of damages for land taking.) 

Beatrice Humphrey and another v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for 
assessment of damages for land taking.) 

Philip J. Hennessey v. Board of Water Commissioners, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for 
reduction of betterment assessment. ) 

C. During the year I960 the following actions by or against the Town were finally disposed of: 

Towne Land Development, Inc. v. Wilmington Planning Board, Middlesex Superior Court. (Dis- I 
missed under rule as inactive). 

Town of Wilmington v. Percy G. Crocker, Middlesex Superior Court. (Dismissed under rule as 
inactive). 

Town of Wilmington v. Allstate Sand h Gravel Co. and Pleasant Homes, Inc. , Middlesex Superior 
Court. (Disposed of by final consent decree in favor of the Town). 

Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington v. Edward G. Moody & Sons, Inc. Fourth District Court of 
Eastern Middlesex, removed to Superior Court. 



20 



I'll 



Edward G. Moody & Sons, Inc. v. Inhabitants of Wilnnington & Others, Fourth District Court of 
Eastern Middlesex, removed to Superior Court. 

(The two last named cases were disposed of after trial in the Superior Court by payment by the Town 
of Judgment obtained by Moody and payment to the Town of a nearly equal amount by the co-defendant). 

Town of Wilmington v. Frederick & Ethel Smith et al, Middlesex Superior Court. 

Town of Wilmington v. Alice C. Dias et al, Middlesex Superior Court. 

(The two last named cases were dismissed by agreement). 

Doris Weinstein v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Disposed of by trial and judg- 
ment fixing plaintiff's damages and payment of judgment). 

Town of Wilmington v. Stephen P. Hathaway and George E. Dunn, Middlesex Superior Court. (This 
case was dismissed by agreement. ) 

Frank and Johanna M. Hingston v. Inhabitants of Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Disposed of by compromise settlement). 

Mildred Tentindo v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Disposed of by compromise 
settlement) . 

Beatrice Humphrey and another v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Disposed of by 
bayment and acceptance of amount awarded as damages by the Selectmen). 

D. Compensation was received by the Town Counsel in said matters and in all other matters during 
he year as follows: 

Compensation $4205. 00, less discount of $2433. 94, to conform to appropriations $1771. 06 

Disbursements 728 . 94 

$2500. 00 

(The above amounts were entirely on account of services rendered and disbursements paid in the 
calendar year 1959. ) 



If 

: ; 

= 

c 



Town Manager 
Wilmington, Mass. 



constable 



I herewith submit my annual report as Constable of the Town of Wilmington for the year ending 
i960. I have posted notices and warrants for the Annual Town Meeting, Special Town Meetings, State 
Primary, and State Election in accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington. I have also served 
and posted notices for other departments of the Town of Wilmington. 

Respectfully submitted, 



A. John Imbimbo 
Constable of Wilmington 



21 



planning board 



\ t J « \ 



Planning Board - Left to right: 
Joseph Slater, Herbert Nickerson, 
Raymond Fitzmaurice, James Banda, 
and John R. Evans . 




General Planning: 



In 1959 the Planning Board, with the assistance of planning consultants, drew up long range program' 
for the town in the field of School Development, Capital Budget Requirements, and Town Recreation. These 
reports are expected to be printed for distribution at the Annual Town Meeting in March 1961. 



Sub-Divisions: 

During 1959 no new sub-divisions were initiated, with the exception of "Hathaway Acres Extension" 
which was being considered for preliminary approval during the latter part of 1959. 

Zoning: 

Proposed amendments to the Zoning By-laws and Map are reviewed by the Planning Board, which 
holds a Public Hearing and submits a formal report and recommendations to the Town Meeting. In each 
particular case during the past year, the Planning Board's recommendations were felt to be in keeping with 
the best interests of the town as a whole and not just the area surrounding the locality to be rezoned. 

In each case of rezoning during 1959, the Town Meeting vote followed the Planning Board recommen 
dations, with but one exception. The Board wishes to thank the townspeople for their support on these 
matters. 

Parks and Recreation: 

The Planning Board, which also serves as the Board of Park Commissioners, is striving to make 
Silver Lake Beach a better recreational center through gradual improvement of the grounds and facilities. 

In 1959 the length of the beach was extended by dredging and filling with sand. Minor improvement 
were made to the bath house facilities. Next year the parking lot will be enlarged, and the surfacing will 
be improved. Some landscaping is also planned (depending on the budget). 

22 



I 



Special Meetings and Hearings: 



During 1959 the Planning Board, in addition to holding its twice -monthly meetings, attended several 
public hearings and dozens of special meetings with other boards and committees. The Public Hear nls 
concerned rezomng, land taking by the Town, and Board of Appeal hearings. Hearings 

Special meetings were held to discuss Zoning enforcements selertinn of =^v,^^i 
of schools, capital budget planning, urban renewal. Ind revisTons t'o Z nTng" M pT /b'-^^^ ^IveTl 
meetings were held with new industries interested in locating in Wilmington. 

Advisory Member of the Permanent Building Committee: 

r-iannmg lioard in all of the Town's new construction planning. During 1959 the Plannlna Ro.,-^ k 
attended about twenty percent of these meetings. Planning Board member 



General: 



dog officer 



Dog Licenses 1136 

Kennels $50.00 

25.00 



10. 00 








Dogs Confined 201 
Complaints Covered 5gg 
Dogs Destroyed 

Dogs Disposed of 286 
Dogs Killed by Cars 3j 
Resident Calls for Licenses 352 



23 




town engineer 



TOWN ENGINEER 
Alphonse Savignac 




Two of the Northeastern University cooperative students, employed by the ^^-^/j^^^^P^^^^^^^^ 

time . 

The work handled by the department during the year consisted of relocating the Town line between 
tension at Silver Lake. 

The construction of new Route 93 through the Town brought on new problems of drainage and re - 
zoning attempts by new industries wishing to locate in Wilmington. Drainage problems 
and corrected when possible. Maps and descriptions for areas to be rezoned were prepared for Town 
Meetings as requested by the Planning Board. 

article Pineridge Road was built under the uettermeni ^<-i. y , . , , y. r^jj^^o nn North 

"marns to be done to complete these two projects. An easement was obtained from Mr. Beddoes on North 
Street to provide an outlet to Lubbers Brook for the drainage of these two streets. 

The plans for Boutwell Street, from Burlington Avenue to the entrance of the road to the new 
school, were also completed and recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 



24 



Additional surveys were made to obtain the nece 
Renewal which was turned down by the voters. 



ssary information to complete the plans for Urb^ 



the firs. p.?™it wL" rpi:"ea r:htt:LvLT/ — ^ 

ICS was Ranted by .he pLntg Bca^d Tn^aLa^^ er„r::rLr.nl .t" 

Deve.cp„e':.:= ^He" s";„r. Tr" i s'-^u'-j-'z^tar^iL.': r,r;^r'a:;/ir"'"M " 

to ob.ain a clear picture of the situation All fh, Lf„ ""'"=■^■1, and considerable mvestieation was done 
and it is hoped to'obtain a legal t"c!r„ .oT^Z 7^™::"".'"" '° 



recreation commission 



The Recreation Comnnission respectfully submits its annual report for the year 1960. 

variety of a^UW.ts ^;i:L^otfd~rr p" stltl^^ ^ 
vised playgrounds for children, a boys' baseba Hea/ue a sofih» " ' activities as super- 

Which no. only offers protection of li^e, but .n^l'^^-rsirU^ll!,' s':^^ "^^^^ . 

instruction'," In': pt^tci fii"s":r:?f:;;dt:h:'"°h <"^"^«^-". p-v^'-' cui.--. goi, 

to take part. gymnas.ums - boys, men, and women are eligible 

whUe the stsT^^'rorT "es" 'Vhe 'f^H '5 "th^'T -"""""^ - '""-se in personnel 

the Town Manager a^rth^e'^rs'oYth"^"^^^^^^^^^ '^^"^^ " 

commenci„''g1:79"'td°tV?wmr'""''rr' °' ' '"<i playground at the Boutwell School area 

supervised Lea a^^heT^rr^h Wi":!^^^^^^^^^^^ establishment of a 

assista„ce^n'theTe";uro^yiTo",?K'r*^^^ 1° Commission for their 

Town Manager andTo'^e' Tr^ tl ^ t^he-r-coore^arn."" ^ = °" ^ '° 



25 




board of appeals 



Following is the report of the Board of Appeals for the year I960. This report contains the 
date of the hearing, the name of the applicant, and the decision of each case. 



Dec. 23, 1959: 



Jan. 7, I960: 



Wilmington Sales - Variance in Zoning Laws for proposed erection of body shop for 
Wilmington Ford Co. on land located next to 683 Main Street - Approved with restrictions 

Robert W. Deitrich - For a non-conforming addition to dwelling on Woburn Street - 
Approved 12' side lot. 

Helen Chrusciel - Right to erect dwelling on non-conforming lot on Chestnut St. - Approve 
Webster Cement Co. - Erect a manufacturing plant at 841 Woburn Street - Approved. 



Jan. 14, I960: 



Feb. 4, I960: 



Mar. 3, I960: 



Mar. 24, I960: 



Apr. 7, I960: 



Johnson's Realty Trust - Right to erect dry cleaning plant on Middlesex Avenue near 
Post Office - Approved. 

Leo Trimarchi & Anthony Micalizzi - Variance in Zoning Laws to rectify previous sur- 
veying error on size of lots - Approved. 

Ether L. Warner - Variance in zoning to erect house on Adams Street on lot not having 
required frontage - Approved with restrictions. 

Robert & Barbara Belbin - Right to erect home on Andover Street near new Route 125, 
on lot having less than required area - Granted. 

Edsel Tocci - To sell loam within and outside of Town from development on Woburn St. - 
No action. 

Mr. Calandrello - Variance of 20 ft. in frontage on lot on Main St. - Granted. 

Gabriele DePiano'-Extension of permit for trailer used as living quarters - Cunningham 
Street - Granted with restrictions. 

Harold W. Foley - Permission to install a suitable sign for advertising purposes at 
188 Main Street - Granted. 

Edsel Tocci - Right to remove excess loam from Fay Farm, Woburn St. - Denied 

Robert G. Arsenault - Re-subdivide two existing lots for purpose of correcting boundary 
lines - Approved. 

Charles M. Lennox - Variance to allow for erection of addition to gas station nearer to 
lot line than law allows, 945 Main Street - Granted with provisions. 

William F. Magee - Variance to set aside house lot at 406 Chestnut Street, not in con- 
formity with Zoning Law - Denied. 

Bert Quigley - Variance in Zoning Law to divide his property into two households - 
Granted. 

26 



Apr. 7, I960: 



Paul Godzyk - Right to erect repair garage, corner Lowell and Young Street - 
Conditional approval. 



Apr. 14, I960: Sadie Griffith - Right to erect real estate office at corner Kiernan Avenue & Main Street, 
lot not having required frontage - Denied. 

Larz Neilson - Erect temporary shed not having required foundation, 364 Middlesex 
Avenue - Granted. 



North American Acceptance Corporation - Erect gas station at 503 Main Street with 
pump, island and lights being closer than 30 ft. to street line, not in accordance with 
Zoning Law - Granted with restrictions. 

Apr. 21, I960: Clarence Spinazola - To operate a public dump off Old Main Street - Approved with 
restrictions. 

Henry J. & Sarah J. Flight - Proposed subdivision of their property, 74 Shawsheen Ave. , 
to have two lots, one of which will be smaller than the law allows - Denied. 

Apr. 28, I960: Lester H. Peabody, Jr. - To build two houses on lot not having required frontage on 
Jaquith Road - Denied. 

Roderick Wm. Hoag - To build commercial building with less than required front yard 
on Middlesex Avenue - Denied. 



Salvatore Provenzano - To complete garage started in 1946 that is too close to lot line, 
102 West Street - Approved. 

Jonathan A. Hamilton - To live in existing house until new house is complete on Hopkins 
Street - Granted with provisions. 

James L. McLaughlin - To build on lot with less than required frontage on Shawsheen 
Avenue - Granted 8' variance. 

May 5, I960: Gladys Swenson, Admnx. - Variance in Zoning Laws to allow for two 25' radius corners 

on two planned house lots at 704 Woburn Street - Denied. 

Dr. Morris Kelman - Variance in Zoning Law to correct boundaries between two houses 
at 2 McDonald Road - Denied. 

Steve Shanniak - Variance in Zoning Laws to allow the division of his land into two house 
lots not in conformity with law, 109 West Street - Denied. 

Donald H. Robbins - Variance in Zoning Laws to allow gravel pit off Ballardvale Street, 
approximately 16 acres - Denied. 

silay 19 , I960: Kenneth & Jean Iverson (Switzer) - 92 Chestnut Street, for variance in Zoning Laws to 

allow for commercial greenhouse at their residence - Approved with conditions. 

Albert D. Malone - For variance in side line requirements for lot of land on Grand 
Street - Approved 5' variance each side yard. 

James F. Bimbo - Variance in Zoning Law to divide into two lots a lot of land at cornei 
of Lloyd Road and Beeching Avenue - Approved. 



27 




May 19, I960: Shell Oil Company - Variance in Zoning Law to allow for erection of roof sign, corner 

of Main Street & Lowell Street - Approved sign 9'6" above roof. 



Joseph Bradley - Variance in Zoning Law to allow for addition of 5 ft. to front of his 
house, 23 North Street - Granted 8' variance. 

May 26, I960: Sidney Zides - Variance in Zoning Law to allow for erection of garage closer to lot line 

than law allows, Randolph Road - Approved 7' from lot line. 

Sylvia Stanley - Variance in Zoning Law to allow for division of lot of land 150 ft. wide 
into two house lots , 58 High Street - Denied. 

Gabriele DePiano- Variance in Zoning Law to allow for erection of home on lot smaller 
than law allows, Cunningham Street - Approved variance of 6' on each side of lot. 

Wigo & David Anderson - Removal of earth products from their property on Park Street 
Denied. 



June 2, I960: Charles W. & Barbara Morris - Variance on Zoning Law to allow for erection of house 

on lot of land not having required depth, between Carter Street and Walker Street - 
Approved with conditions. 



Ernest Call - Variance on Zoning Law to divide lot of land between Fairview Avenue and 
Lexington Street - Denied. 

July 7, I960: Raymond C. Booth - To build a garage 5 ft. from side line, 15 ft. from rear line, 

38 Lowell Street - Granted. 



July 14, I960 : Louis Werner - Variance in Zoning Law to erect garage on his property 10 ft. from side 

lot line, 9 Marcus Road - Granted. 



Robert Doucette - Variance in Zoning Law to build breezeway and garage on property 
5 ft. from side lot line, 1 Ledgewood Road - Granted. 

July 28, I960 : Harold W. Foley - To erect sign as accessory use to licensed package store, 240 Main 

Street - Granted 5' x 20' non-flashing. 

Aug. 4, I960: Meadow Construction Co. Inc. - Variance in Zoning Law to allow for construction of 

house on non-conforming lot on Hopkins Street - Approved. 



Aug. 25, I960: Albert A. Salera - Variance to erect home on lot having proper area but non-conforming 
property lines, 20 Shaw sheen Avenue - Approved on depth. 

John F. Comeau - Variance to allow for erection of home on lot of land at North Street 
and Dadant Drive, not having required area or frontage - Granted 7' variance. 

William R. Harrison - Variance to allow him to build 7' closer to lot line than law allow 
136 Church Street - Granted variance of 7' on side yard. 

Albert D. Malone & David I. Elfman - Correction of errors on four lots of land at 
Taplan Ave. , Phillips Ave. , and York Street - Granted. 

Stella M. Blanchette - Variance to build home on lot of land at Broad and Clermont 
Streets which does not comply with Zoning Laws - Delayed. 



28 



TJ^S '^TZf - '° '"^^ °" -'"^ 'ess ..an .e,„i,.<, ,.ae 

George & Eleanor Stevens (Jenney Mfg ) - Variance to c^t v • 



Sept. 29, I960: 



Oct. 13, I960: 



NTov. 1, I960: 



^ov. 15, I960: 



jov. 22, I960: 



Lewxs & Margaret Carbone - Variance to divide their land into two lots for housing 
Ap^ovid^^ ^^^^^'"^^ ^--^ -^^^-^ dept^Xwe?^ St. - 

^n hff ■ L--^ to allow for the construction of a golf course 

on h.s and adjacent property, Chestnut Street - Granted subject to final approval of plan 

Ts crctd^rre: : G:::::r " ^ '^""^^ ^^-^^ -lows. 
:t r^^^^d":^^-^::::^" " ^^"^-^ °" ^-^-^^ - ^--^ 

Jackson Brothers, Inc. - Variance to erect dwelling on Crest Avenue and to change 
present lot frontages in so doing - Granted. ^ 

John G. Laganos - Variance m Zoning Law to allow for erection of sign closer to street 
than law allows - Denied. ^ <-ioser lo street 

on^Wf^inT''" ■ re-divide three lots of land behind Whitefield School 

on Whitefield Terrace - Granted. 

Jan^es Tighe - Authority to expand skating pond, Chestnut Street - No action. 

Brookline Realty - Variance to locate signs and pumps within required front yard, and 
sign on building of proposed gas station at 205 Main St. - Granted with restrictions. 

4qT//'' ^t^'^ ■ by-law to allow for sign larger than law allows. 

496 Main Street - Decision pending final plans. 

GrlntlT°" ^^'"'^ ^ " ""^"'^""^ *° ^ig" °" ^^"°Py at 240 Main Street - 



29 



Nov. 2Z, I960: Daniel F. Hurley - To allow for erection of breezeway and garage 13' from side lire of 
his land at 12 Fairmeadow Road - Granted. 



Dec. 6, I960: Henry M. Park - Variance on five lots of land at corner of Woburn Street and Park St. , 

relocated, all with sufficient area but two lacking depth and four-foot frontage - Granted 
with restrictions. 

June Malagodi - Variance to allow for temporary occupancy of trailer on Butters Row - 
Denied. 



Building By-Law Committee 



Building By-law Committee: 
Left to right - Garnet Mills, 
Roland Wood and Ray Fitzmaurice. 




As predicted in its annual report of I960, your committee completed its primary task of preparing ' 
and submitting a report of its findings and recommendations to the Town Manager and the Board of Select- 
men, during the past year. 

Upon this committee's request, said report was placed by way of an article, in a special town 
meeting held in November of I960. Unfortunately, prior to the matter reaching a vote, the meeting was 
adjourned to the following week. Upon the town's eligible voters reflecting a complete lack of interest in 
the article, the meeting failed to attract svifficient people to meet a quorum, and the meeting and its only 
article was postponed to some indefinite date. 

Your committee feels that they have discharged their duty and responsibility which they undertook! 
nearly some four years ago, upon the request of the then Town Manager and Board of Selectmen. At that 
time, the committee was lead to believe that there existed an urgent and real need for a revised building 
code. It now remains with our town leaders and the people themselves as to whether that need still exists 
and whether they have any confidence in the committee and its recommendations. 



30 



building inspector 



Building Inspector, Minot Anderson 
discussing plans with a builder 



I find that many people seem confused as to the relation between the Zoning By-law and the Sub- 
division Control Law. A major provision of the Subdivision Control Law, and one with which the average 
citizen most frequently comes in contact, is the one providing that plans of land will not be accepted for 
record at the Registry of Deeds in Lowell unless they bear the signatures of a majority of the Planning 
Board. 

Many times these plans are signed as "not requiring approval under the Subdivision Control Law" 
Plainly, this is not an approval of any kind, although persons frequently say over the phone that a certain 
plan is approved by the Planning Board on the basis of these signatures. Whether or not a lot is suitable 
for building depends on its conformity with the provisions of Section V of the Zoning By-law, with the ex- 
ceptions found therein or in the General Laws. I bring out this point of information because I sometimes 
talk to a prospective builder for an hour without being able to make the difference clear. 

Below is a record of the private dwelling permits issued in the past five years: 

1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 

Number of Dwelling Permits 148 137 136 1 10 93 




As you can see, the number of private dwelling permits has decreased each year. This is partly 
due to the fact that fewer suitable lots are available, but in larger part, it is the result of past work of the 
Planning Board in submitting for adoption the Zoning By-law and the Subdivision Control Law, and in pro- 
mulgating subdivision regulations which placed the cost of subdivisions on the developer and not on the tax- 
payer. 

It is as these results of their work become apparent that the townspeople can become truly aware of 
the great value of their services. 

Part of the Building Inspector's work lies in the literal enforcement of these By-laws and Regula- 
tions; but another part is the issuance of permits. The past year's work is listed below. 

Permits Issued No. Fees Insp. Received 



Building Permits 280 $1,118.00 

Plumbing Permits 133 956.00 748.00 

Wiring Permits 397 1 , 830. 85 1. 399. 80 

$3, 904. 85 $2, 147. 80 



31 



police department 



ARRESTS 



Armed Robbery 1 

Assault & Battery 2 

A. W. O. L. (Military) 1 

Breaking & Entering k Larceny 3 

Carrying Concealed Weapon 1 

Drunkenness 47 

Illegitinnacy 1 

Indecent Assault 1 

Juveniles Arrested 5 

Larceny 3 

Lewdness 3 



Total Persons Arrested 
Total Fines Assessed 



Non Support 6 

Operating Under the Influence 6 

Operating Without a License 1 

Operating So As To Endanger 3 

Operating After Suspension 3 

Operating Without Inspection Sticker 6 

Operating at Excessive Speed 5 

Operating Unregistered Vehicle 3 

Operating Uninsured Vehicle 3 

Rape (Statutory) 1 

Arrested for Other Departments 4 



109 
$550 



DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES 



Auto Accidents Reported 197 

Auto Accidents (Personal Injuries) 72 

Auto Accidents Fatal 2 

Complaints Received 506 

Complaints Requiring Investigation 312 

Complaints of Vandalism 304 

Domestic Problems Investigated 198 

Prowlers Reported 52 

Juvenile Cases (No Court Action) 18 

Summonses Delivered 305 

Indecent Phone Calls Reported 8 

Indecent Exposure Cases Reported 4 

Emergency Cruiser Trips 39 

Fires Responded To 26 

Reports of Stolen Property 110 

Sudden Deaths Investigated 7 

Suicides Investigated 1 

Attempted Suicides 2 



Buildings Found Open 82 

Buildings Broken Into 48 

Burglar Alarms Responded To 47 

Bicycles Stolen 31 

Bicycles Recovered 25 

Children Reported Lost 11 

Children Returned 11 

Autos Reported Stolen 10 

Autos Recovered 12 

Persons Reported Missing 27 

Runaways Reported 9 

Found Unconscious in Vehicle 1 

Private Sales of Motor Vehicles 27 5 

Sales by Class 1 Dealers 518 

Sales by Class 2 Dealers 563 

Roadwatches (Registry Program) 6 

Licenses Suspended (Residents) 108 

Notices Sent Registry for Action 196 

Department Warnings Issued 213 



32 



That just about covers the activities of the department for I960, but it must be pointed out that we 
io a terrific amovmt of work that will never appear in newspapers or a published report such as this. Work 
if such a personal scope that we must protect those involved from unfair publicity. 



The year I960 will be recorded as our best year, for it was on June 7 that we moved into our New 
Police Station. We are so proud of our new station and wish at this time to express our most sincere 
hanks to the Permanent Building Committee, Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, and the Townspeople 
vho made it all possible. 

May I conclude this report by expressing my genuine thanks and appreciation to the Women Traffic 
supervisors for their devoted efforts. 

To the Fire Department for "sharing their station with us for the first six months of the year", 
ind for all their wonderful assistance to date. 

To the Highway Department, Water Department, Tree Department, School Department, and all 
jthers who have been so cooperative. 

To the Board of Selectmen for their continued support and cooperation. 

To "Cecil" Lancaster, Town Manager, for all the wonderful things you have done for my depart- 
nent - and most of all the splendid way by which you accomplished them. 




Graduation - Five week training progrann 
at the State Police Academy - left to right, 
Commissioner of Public Safety, J. Henry Goguen, 
Officer Charles Ellsworth, Officer Anthony Langone, 
and Captain James A. Critecos. 



fire department 



The i960 report of the Fire Chief is hereby submitted. The manual force consists of Chief, three 
Lieutenants, and twelve Privates. There is a call force of fifteen members. 

The Fire Department responded to a total of seven hundred and twenty-one (721) calls, two hundrec 
and one (201) bell alarms, and five hundred and twenty (520) still alarms. 



A total of 51 , 470 ft. of fire hose was laid: 30,370 ft. of booster hose , 6,450 ft. of 1 1/8", 
5,450 ft. of I 1/2", 9,100 ft. of 2 1/2", and 100 ft. of 3" hose. Ladders were raised 733 ft. Total 
value of property endangered was $394, 050. 00. The property loss was $51, 305. 53. 

Inspections were made as required by the State of rest homes, schools, all public buildings, and 
all new gasoline tank locations. 

All equipment is in good condition, with the exception of Engine #5 at the North Wilmington Pumpir 
Station. This engine is in very poor condition, and for the past three years, I have requested to have it 
replaced. Engine #1 was repainted this year. The members of the department have done a terrific job 
remodeling the station, doing all the work themselves, which has been a great savings to the taxpayers. 

Members of the department installed fire alarm wires along Burlington Avenue to the Boutwell Str< 
School; along Lowell Street; and down Woburn and Eames Streets. Several street boxes were installed al 



Ambulance Calls 
Auto &t Trucks 
Brush & Grass 
Buildings 
Chimneys 
Service Calls 



306 
26 

214 
52 
2 
57 



Dumps 

Electric Wires 
False Alarms 
Oil Burners 
Out of Town 
R. R. Trains 



1 1 
2 
33 
12 
4 
2 



Permits Issued for Blasting 
Permits Issued for Burning 
Permits Issued for Gas 
Permits Issued for Oil 



21 

2345 
52 
101 



34 



tree department 





TREE DEPT. SUPT. 
John W. Babine 



Tree Department: 



Routine work was carried on throughout the year, such as rennoving trees, broken limbs, cutting 
ay broken tops, and trimming low limbs. One hundred and seven trees were cut down for street widening. 
L the brush was taken to the dump and burned. The shade trees were sprayed three times. We put the 
ristmas tree, given by Mr. Herbert C. Barrows, on the Town Common. 

• 

Moth Department: 

This year we sprayed all the shade trees with 6% and 12% D. D. T. for gypsy moth, tent caterpillars, 
1 webworms, aphids, pine shoot moth, oak blight, and maple leaf spot. We found a few gypsy moths in 
rth Wilmington, and we sprayed and painted all the egg clusters with creosote. We sprayed all the lawns 
h 6% D. D. T. for Japanese beetle and milky disease. 

Elm Leaf Beetle and Dutch Elm Disease: 



All elms were sprayed three times with D. D. T. The spraying was started May 10 and continued 
lil August 20. At this time I want to say that the new sprayer was a big help. This year we lost a 
T^dred and two elm trees with dutch elm disease. We sent a hundred and fifty samples to Amherst State 
iilege to be tested, and one hundred and two samples came back "Dutch Elm Disease". We have cut down 
ihty-one elms to date, and have to cut down the rest before April 30. The State Department of Natural 
'Sources sent a crew of four men and a truck to help us with some of the work - a big saving to the Town. 

Mosquitoe s: 

This year we sprayed the swamps, bog holes, and around the homes as far as we could reach, 
sprayed on windy days so that the spray would carry across the swamps. Please, clean up any old tin 
is around your property as these can hold stagnant water that breeds mosquitoes. 

Poison Ivy: 

1 Streets, stone walls, and homes, where poison ivy was found, were sprayed with brush killer, 

^also sprayed brush along roadsides to kill the brush. 

! 

Town Forest: 



This year we cut down a lot of underbtush, broken limbs, and some dead trees. 



3 
c : 

0: 
C 

E 



35 




water department 



Board of Water Commissioners, 
Left to right - Harold E. Melzar, 
Waldo Stevens, Arnold C. Blake, 
and Mrs. Sylvia Bowman, Clerk. 




Water Supply: 

The new pumping equipment has been installed at the Barrow's Station together with additional 
wells. All the wells at this station have been cleaned and tested. The capacity of this station has been ii 
creased from 500,000 gallons per day to 1,000,000 gallons per day. 

Detailed Pumping Statistics are set forth below 
1956 1957 1958 1959 

Maximum gallons 

pumped per Day 1,458,100 1,800,500 1,850,600 2,089,100 

Maximum gallons 

pumped per Week 9,548,000 11,784,000 9,731,500 14,1 16,700 13,213: 

Maximum gallons 

pumped per Month 41,020,400 44,339,000 38,549,000 56,948,300 48,168 

Average gallons 

pumped per Day 922,470 979,750 1,081,700 1,590,785 1,42^ 

Average gallons 

pumped per Month 28,135,330 29,800,825 32,902,000 48,386,442 43,278 

Total gallons 

pumped per Year 337,623,950 357,609,900 394,824,800 580,637,300 519,387 



36 



Water Main Extensions: 



The following installations were put in: 



Street 



No. of Feet 
8" Main 



No. of Feet 
6" Main 



Under the Betterment 
Program 



Lowell Street 
Fairfield Road 



884 
512 



By Builders and 
Developer s 

By water takers being 
served 



Concord Street 
Cedar Crest Road 



Adams Street 



1, 200 



350 



350 



Miscellaneous Information: 



Metered Services 2,871 

Unmetered Services 62 

Total Services 2, 933 

New Hydrants Installed 3 

New Services Installed 132 

New Meters Installed 164 




37 



Permanent Building Committee 



Since it was established at the Annual Town Meeting in 1958, the Permanent Building Connnnittet 
received authorization from the Town Meeting to undertake the construction of three schools, a police stat(i 
and a Highway Department garage. As of December I960, two of the schools, the police station and the 
garage were occupied and in use. 

Glen Road Elementary School: 

The first project assigned to the Permanent Building Committee - it is now virtually complete, i 
The landscaping and finishing of the playground area was started last fall. If the winter is not too sever* 
this final completion of the project will be realized in the spring, within the budget appropriated by the To, 
Meeting. 

Police Station and Highway Department Garage: 

I 

These projects were initiated and bid simultaneously to stimxilate greater competition among co 
tractors, following the vote of the 1959 Annual Town Meeting to authorize construction. Both buildings w i 
furnished and occupied this past year, although exterior site work will not be finished until spring. Altho ,(t 
both buildings were constructed within very tight budgets, the committee does not anticipate that additiona | 
funds will be required to complete either project. 

Boutwell Street Elementary School: ' 

Site-adapted from the plans of the Glen Road School, this was the second school to be built accqJ 
ing to the circiilar design for elementary schools through which the town has achieved substantial savings'! 
the taxpayers. Construction of this school was authorized at a Special Town Meeting on July 1, 1959, bui 
was not occupied until October I960. The delay in completion apparently cannot be attributed to any sing 
circ\imstance but rather to a series of minor events which the contractor contends had the cumulative efle 
of a month's delay. To date the committee has not settled this matter with the contractor, and final con) 
ment must therefore be reserved. | 

It now appears that the committee will be unable to provide complete landscaping and playgroun 
facilities equivalent to the Glen Road School because of budgetary limitations. As a result of price incre 
and different site conditions, the budget for this project was much more restrictive, for the building itsel 
cost approximately $37, 000 more than the Glen Road School. The most obvious disadvantage from this 
situation is the fact that the town can receive fifty per cent reimbursement from the Commonwealth for a] 
work done prior to the legal completion of the project. It is possible that, after consultation with its advj 
members, the committee may recommend further action to the town. 

North Wilmington Intermediate School: | 

On November 28, I960, a Special Town Meeting approved the construction of Wilmington's first 
intermediate school. This building will consist of approximately twenty classrooms and related facilitiel 
and the committee recommended $1, 100, 000. 00 for its construction. On the recommendation of the Finajl 
Committee, this sum was reduced by $50, 000. 00, although certain extraordinary requirements were implTj 
after the budget had been prepared. 

The Permanent Building Committee will make every effort to complete the project within the 
appropriation, but it is not yet possible to forecast the effect of the reduced budget. Meanwhile, the mi 

38 

I 



^mediate hurdle confronting the construction of the school is the severe snow accumulation and deep frost 
' the current winter. Work is scheduled to start on or about April 1, 1961, but this will probably not be 
)ssible because of the cited weather conditions. 

Additional Site Acquisitions: 

The Pernnanent Building Committee is also invested with the responsibility of recommending sites 
be acquired for future school facilities. In close cooperation with the Planning Board and the School 
spartment, the committee has developed a listing of probable appropriate sites consistent with the findings 
id recommendations of the town's planning consultants. 

This problem is plainly one of economy. The town is well aware of increasing land costs which 
Lve accompanied the opening of Interstate Route 93, and it is also cognizant of the increasing burden on 
e tax rate from the school building program. With the continued cooperation of other town agencies, it 
the intention of the committee to recommend specific site acquisitions to a Special Town Meeting in 1961. 
ich recommendations will conform to the town's long range planning program and the anticipated educational 
!eds of Wilmington over the next ten years. 

The Permanent Building Committee is appreciative of the cooperation extended by its advisory 
embers designated by other town boards and committees. On the basis of the experience of the Permanent 
ailding Committee, this feature is commended to other town agencies and boards whose work may involve 
e coordination of the efforts of several agencies of the town. The committee heartily endorses those 
easures which provide the unifying influence and spirit of cooperation which are needed to efficiently and 




HIGHWAY GARAGE 



39 



highway department ° 



All regular routine work such as brush cutting and burning, cleaning catch basins and culverts, 
cutting back shoulders and hauling away the dirt was carried out. Twenty-one new street signs and nnany 
traffic signs were erected at the request of the Town Manager of the Police Department. 

There seems to be some controversy over street signs because the Planning Board changed the 
name of many streets, and this has since been ruled illegal. I have had requests for street signs under 
their new names but have refused to purchase them for the above reason, and many people insist the names 
have been changed regardless of the ruling. 

At this writing all highway equipment is in very good condition regardless of the heavy snow stor 
I have kept repair costs at a low minimum because just about all the work is done at the Town Garage by tw 
mechanics Since the occupation of our new garage, all town-owned vehicles are repaired and serviced b 
my two men. All parts and tires are purchased by the Highway Department and charged to the department 
using the vehicle. As time progresses, I will purchase various tools andmachinery needed by the mechani 
to complete our setup. 

The following is a report of the work accomplished under the various chapters and accounts. 
Carolyn Road - Special Appropriation: 

All brush, trees, stumps, boulders, ledge and subsoil were removed. Five catch basins were 
installed, and 550 ft. of drainage pipe laid. The entire street has been graveled and will be surface- 
treated in the Spring or early Summer. To eliminate the water condition on North Street and carry the wat. 
from Carolyn Road, and at the same time catch the water draining from Pineridge Road, three catch basir 
were installed and about 600 feet of drain pipe had to be laid. 

Pineridge Road - Betterments - Special Appropriation: 

All brush, trees, stumps, boulders, ledge and subsoil were removed. Six catch basins were m 
stalled, and 650 feet of drainage pipe laid. Ledge removal was the greatest cost because I had to blast o 
the ledge for the roadway, and then cut a trench for the drain pipe from 2 to 7 feet deep - a distance of 
about 700 feet. The blasted ledge could not be used for backfilling the trench, and it had to be hauled awax 
and replaced with gravel. The entire street has been graveled and will be surface -treated in the Spring 
or early Summer. 

Chapter 90 Maintenance: 

Lowell Street was surfaced (30 ft. wide) with a layer of hot top for a distance of 2550 feet at a 
cost of $4497. 00. The cost of raising the catch basins was paid from Chapter 81. 

Chapter 90 Construction - 1959 Contract: 

Concord Street from Woburn Street. This was started in I960 and completed as per State 
specifications. All brush, trees, stumps, peat, ledge, boulders and subsoil were removed. Two catch 
basins and 140 feet of pipe were installed. The old stone bridge was replaced with a twin steel culvert, 
asphalt coated. The street was then graveled, graded, rolled and surface-treated with two applications ol 
heavy tar, back covered with stone, and rolled. One thousand feet of guard rail was erected and painted. 
As to the bottleneck at the railroad crossing, this situation will be eliminated in 1961 by the railroad and 
Western Union This work will cost the Town about $7, 000. 00 but must be done by the above. 



40 



Chapter 90 Construction - I960 Con tract: 
Concord and Federal Streets to Middlesex Avenue. 



, „ trees, stumps and subsoil have been 

•emoved on Concord Street. The trees along Federal Street have been removed, but the stumps remain for 
)rotection until the Spring of 1961 at which time construction will begin again. 



Chapter 90 Construction for 196 1: 

I have requested funds to surface Concord Street from Woburn Street to Federal Street and 
'ederal Street to Middlesex Avenue with three inches of hot top - 30 feet wide. 

Marcus Road - Betterments: 



nn f .1 u .r'J^ completing the circle has been removed. The area consisted of about 

00 feet long by 40 feet wide of solid ledge. I hired a wagon drill, a compressor, and the steel, plus the 
perator for $185.00 per day. He averaged 370 feet of holes per day for ten days. I used 1050 lbs of 

^ynamite and 550 caps. I hired two stone trucks, one yard and a half shovel, and one bulldozer to haul it 
way. Due to the fact that Mr. Flynn of Cowing Road had use for it, I finished the hauling in six days the 

•jistance bemg about 1500 feet round trip. Otherwise I would have had to haul it about three or four miles 

jne way. The street is impassible right now, but I will gravel it in the Spring and surface -treat it later 

Jhe cost to date is $5400. 00. 

Chapter 8 1 : 
Surface treatment: 



Aldrich Road 
Andover Street 
Ballardvale Street 
Beeching Avenue 
Clark Street 
Cross Street 

Drainage: 

Adams Street 
Burlington Avenue 



Federal Street 
Forest Street 
High Street 
Lake Street 
Liberty Street 
Park Street 



Fairmeadow Road 
Grove Avenue 



Graveling &c Surface Treatment: 

Cedar Avenue Chestnut Street 

Miscellaneous: 



Roman Way 
Salem Street 
Swain Road West 
West Street 
Woburn Street 



Lowell Street 
Pinewood Road 
Shaw sheen Avenue 



Shawsheen Road 



Church Street 
Middlesex Avenue 
Garden Court 
Lockwood Road 
Glenview Road 
Wilson Street 
Nichols Street 
Grant Street 
Fairfield Road 



650 ft. of granite curb laid, plus grading and Ic 
Granite curb, sidewalk, street surfacing 
New culvert 

Reconstruction and surface treatment 
Retaining walls and surface treatment 
Shoulder work 

Reconstruction, graveling, surface treatment 
Finish the end (subsoil removal, etc. ) 
Finish the end (subsoil removal, etc. ) 



In regards to our new Highway Garage, I have but one complaint and that is about the gas heating 
stem. I have had much trouble keeping it in operation. Some adjustments have to be made because of 
jilty mechanism. My greatest objection to this heating system is the cost. At the present rate of gas 



41 



consumption, by the first of April, it will have cost the Town about $2800. 00. In my opinion, it should 
be definitely changed to oil heat. It would pay for itself in two years, and not more than three years, 
because of the big saving in the cost of the gas. Other than the heating system in the main garage, the me] 
and I are very happy with the setup, and it has been a pleasure to work in the building regardless of weathe 
conditions. Many people have never seen the garage, and they are welcome to visit us. 

In conclusion, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the various department heads for 
their cooperation and help when needed, and the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen for their suggestio: 
and guidance. 




HIGHWAY SUPERINTENDENT 
James H. White 




New Sidewalk Snowplow 
in action 
42 



li 




board of cemetery commissioners 



CEMETERY SUPERINTENDENT 
Francis Downs 



During I960 regular routine work was carried on. Raking is necessary all year; and grading of 
ots, which have sunken graves in them, is an operation which requires much time each year. In the near 
uture, we are hoping to have all sunken graves brought up to a level. Constant mowing was necessary 
his year due to the rapid growth of the grass. Five ton of calcium lime was spread on about sixty per 
;ent of the grass ground, and three ton of lG-6-4 fertilizer covered about fifty per cent of the cemetery 
and that we mow. 

In i960 we hot topped avenues in Sections A and B which almost completed these two sections in 
he cemetery. The shoulders along these roads had to be loamed, and grass seed planted to finish off the 
;dges. Construction continued on the development of new lots. A contractor was hired to excavate a 
iection to a level, and fill and loam were hauled in with the help of the highway trucks. This area is now 
eady for planting in the spring of 1961. A new section, approximately 40' x 150' has been established 
.nd seeded for an Angel Lot for the internment of babies. 

This being a combined department - cemetery, parks, and school grounds maintenance - the 
imployees are continually working between these areas. The parks require constant maintenance; namely, 
'he Common, the Town Park, Silver Lake Beach, many small areas around town, and the various schools 
n Wilmington with numerous acres of grass ground and play areas. 



L 

n 

I' 

(J 
c ; 

= 

c 



A 3/4 ton four-wheel drive Chevrolet truck was purchased this year for school grounds mainten- 
nce, and it is being used for our combined department. It has worked to a satisfaction beyond words on 
rass land and on the road, even for plowing snow for the Highway Department. 



In concluding my report, I woiild like to thank the Town Manager and the other Town Officials for 
heir assistance; also all the Town Departments for their cooperation and use of various equipment which 
'as helpful in the maintenance of our department. 



Burials in Wildwood Cemetery 



Wilmington residents died in Wilmington 
Wilmington residents died elsewhere 
Non-residents 

Non-residents died in Wilmington 
Transfer 



13 
32 
43 
1 

_1_ 
90 



43 



II 



board of library trustees 



The trustees of the Public Library are pleased to report that I960 was a most encouraging and 
gratifying year. On the one hand there is the service the Library has furnished to the community, which 
can be measured by a few statistics. For example, we welcomed almost 800 new borrowers. Approxi- 
mately 1700 new books were added to our shelves and our total circulation, including books provided by 
the Bookmobile, reached the record figure of 50,000. 

On the other hand there is the wonderful generosity of the community to the Library, which is im 
measurable and for which we wish to express our great appreciation. A trust fund was established for the 
Library by the East Wilmington Betterment Association. The income from this fund is to be used to pur- 
chase children's books. The Wilmington Junior Chamber of Commerce presented to the Library a new set 
of the "Encyclopaedia Britannica". The Friends of the Wilmington Public Library have continued their fine 
support by giving twelve folding chairs for the children who come to the Story Hour, keeping the window 
boxes filled with plants and providing a Christmas tree. The Book Fair held in November was also arrang 
with their assistance. 

We are also very grateful to the staff of the State Regional Library Center in North Reading which 
operates the Bookmobile and does so much to help small libraries like ours. Patronage of the Bookmobile 
now in its third year, increased more than 50% in I960. 

To the staff of our Library we extend our thanks for their diligence and cooperation. 

The resignation of Esther Hall from the Board of Trustees was received with deep regret. 
Mrs. Hall has served the Library both as Librarian and as Trustee, and we will miss her presence and 
the benefit of her experience. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT 



Books added to the Library 1, 603 

Encyclopedias: Americana 30 

Britannica 30 

World Book 20 80 

Records added: Single 48 

Album s 2 

Books circulated: Library 42,267 

Bookmobile 5, 426 

Periodicals circulated 1, 157 

Records circulated 1, 124 

New Borrowers 777 

Fines collected $855.95 



During I960 the increase of circulation of books, records, and periodicals at the Library was 
5, 124; the Bookmobile increase was 881. 

44 



With the addition of three new sets of encyclopedias, the Library now has five up-to-date sets and 
also a one volume Van Nostrand Scientific Encyclopedia. Many other reference books have been added. 

Books were sent to the Whitefield School, and teachers from some of the other elementary schools 
borrowed books for their classrooms. Several classes visited the Library. Books were also borrowed 
from the Division of Library Extension, the Regional Library, and from other towns. High School students 
in increasing numbers are using the Library. The Story Hour for pre-school children is well attended. 



sarah d. j. carter lecture fund 



On April 2, 1959, the Sarah D. J. Carter Lecture Fund Committee presented to the people of 
Wilmington the Women's Symphonette. These women, all accomplished musicians, gave a fine, varied 
program of music. 

Looking ahead to I960, the Committee has engaged Rear Admiral Donald B. MacMillan, world- 
famed explorer and lecturer, whose subject will be "Beyond the Northern Lights". The program will be 
held at the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium on Saturday evening, April 15 at 8. 15 p.m. These programs 
are offered free of charge, and the Committee extends a cordial invitation to all to attend 

The resignation of Alice Allen, a member of this Committee since 1940, has been accepted with 

regret. 

Treasurer's Report 



Receipts Expenditures 



Cash on hand 1/1/60 


$ 22. 


26 


Marsh Program Service 


$250. 00 








Janitor 


10.00 


Received from Town Treas. 


400. 


00 


Police 


10. 00 








Printing - Publicity, Town Crier 


38. 00 


Intere st 


1. 


20 


Publicity - Crusader 


15. 00 




$423. 


46 


J. M. Kelly - Piano Mover 


40. 00 








Stevenson the Florist - Flowers 










for ushers 


2. 00 








High School - Programs 


1. 00 


Cash on hand 1/1/61 


57. 


46 




$366. 00 



45 



1 



board itf lioallli 



Public Health Officer, Patrick A. Thibeau 
at work in the new laboratory 




The year I960 resiilted in the development and achievement of many public health goals in the Tow 
of Wilmington. Some of these achievements were planned in previous years but did not culminate until 196 
As a result, it is felt that the Board of Health can now render many additional services that approach those 
found in major cities with much larger budgets and personnel. Enumerating these developments, we find: 

1 . Establishment of Family Polio Clinics: 

By establishing family polio clinics on Sundays, over 2, 600 doses were given; at one clinic alone 
over 10% of the entire population were inoculated. Such a program is epidemiologically sound as 
so many were protected that the possibility of epidemic in the town is very remote. 

2. Establishment of Biologic Stations: 

In the event of an emergency, it is now possible for physicians to obtain vaccines or anti-toxins 
immediately. Two biologic stations were established this year in two sections of the town with 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health approval. 

3. Establishment of a Public Health Laboratory: 

After a year of planning, a new public health laboratory was completed and in service in October, 
1960. In many ways, this laboratory can and will pay for itself quickly. As an example, in only 
three months, 150% more tests were performed than in 1959. Also, it is necessary to recount 
that now it is possible to perform well water analysis in forty-eight hours or less. Previously 
water samples had to be submitted only on Mondays with the results not known until Thursday or 
Friday. If a sample was not submitted on the first of the week, it had to wait another full week 
which was far from satisfactory when a well could be a cause of sickness. Further, it is now 
possible to render additional chemical examinations for quality, to make more frequent analyses 
on dairy products, and to provide a closer scrutiny of restaurants. 

4. Esta blishment of Legal Division in the Board of Health: 

By the appointment of a special counsel, it is now possible to more rapidly pursue and prosecute 
cases involving violations of the health code. Pre-trial work was conducted initially this year in 
housing cases with hearings being held in District Court. i 



46 



5. Establishment of X-ray Program for Food Handlers: 



This year the Board of Health required and obtained X-ray reports of all persons engaged in the 
preparation of food and drink. By this measure, it is possible to prevent the spread of tuber- 
culosis to persons patronizing restaurants and soda fountains from infected food handlers. 

In i960, Mr. Vinal E. Lewis, after many years with the Board of Health, resigned in March. To 
dm, we are much indebted for his valued assistance and untiring efforts. Mr. Erving Pfau was appointed 
o the vacancy created by Mr. Lewis' resignation. A resume of the activities carried on this year is as 
ollows: 

A. Communicable Disease Control: 



Clinics were again held this year for the immunization of infants and pre-school children from 
three months to six years. All children attending these clinics received protection against diph- 
theria, tetanus (lock-jaw), and pertussis (whooping cough). Although these diseases are now 
virtually controlled, many cases still occur in children who have not received their inoculations. 
It is therefore very important that parents see that this is done, either by their own physicians or 
at one of these clinics. 

1. Immunization Clinics: 



Total number of DPT Clinics 5 

Children inoculated 54 

Children completing series of three doses 46 

Booster doses given 154 

II. Polio Inoculation Clinics: 

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 

dose dose do se dose dose 

Clinic 1 23 

Clinic 2 303 38 126 804 

Clinic 3 184 223 97 474 28 

Clinic 4 _J_6 _84 109 99 2 

Totals 503 345 332 1400 30 2610 



III. Anti-Rabies Clinic: 

For the sixth consecutive year, an anti-rabies clinic was held in the late spring. Gardiner Lester 
D. V. M. , was the attending veterinarian. A total of 492 dogs received their anti-rabies inocula- 
tions. The cost of operating this clinic was defrayed by charging a nominal fee. 

IV. Asian Flu: 

With the advent of a large number of flu cases throughout the country, and the possible spread of 
this disease into the Commonwealth, certain communities were asked to make a weekly survey of 
absenteeism in schools and industries. Wilmington was one of the communities selected and co- 
operated with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health until the emergency was over. 

Summary: It is of interest to note here that through the efforts of their parents, most children 
ntering school have received a maximum or near maximum protection against poliomyelitis and diphtheria 
Jtanus and pertussis (whooping cough). Wilmington School Department statistics show that of 403 children 
1 Grade I, 375 or 93% have had three or more polio doses and 358 or 89% with three or more DPT doses, 
jhis we believe is an enviable record. 

47 



Public Health Nursing: 



I. Public Health Nursing: 

824 

Nursing visits for year I960 ^^^^ 
Fees collected for visits 

all <;prvices connected with the care of tWJ 
This phase of the Public Health Nurse's program -^^^^j;^!^ ^^Z^^;;; teaching through demonstrat 
sick. It means either g.v.ng or arranging for ^^^^J^^'^l^^^^^^^^^^^ ^He direction and 

some of the major diseases for which visits were made is as follows: 

, 167 visits 

Cardio-vascular disorders visits 

Diabetes 38 ^.g^^g 

Cancer 315 visits 

Anemia 33 ^. ^-^^ 

Surgery 228 visits 

Other diseases & conditions 

II. Health Visits: | 

for the family to fulfill all of its functions alone. It is the aim of this service to pr , 

physical, emotional and social well-being. 

III. Day Care Centers - Nursing Homes: 

The licensing of Day Care Centers is the responsibility of the Board of Health. Nursing Homes 
Sei:^ by the StatI Department of Public Health must have an application of approval from the lo, 
Board of Health before a license can be granted. 

A new State Law went into effect in I960 making it necessary for the Building Inspector to submit a 
and one Nursing Home in Wilmington. Seven inspections were made. 



IV. Tuberculosis Report for I960: 



Total No. of Active Cases on Register 

Total No. of Active Cases in Hospital 

New Cases Reported in I960 

No. Placed on Inactive List 

Deaths Reported 

No. of Diagnosed Cases Visited 

Total No. of Visits made to Diagnosed Cases 

Total No. of Visits (contacts, cases, suspects) 

No. of Visits to North Reading State Sanatorium 

No. of Visits to Middlesex County Sanatorium 

No. of Visits to Boston Sanatorium 



12 
1 
2 
6 
1 

17 

72 
178 

10 
7 
1 



In January of I960 a tuberculin testing program was conducted in ^^^/^^-^^^J^J^' ^^^//^^^^^^^^^ 
were tested as part of a case-finding program. Examination of reactors to the test and follow up 
contacts were under the supervision of the Public Health Nurse. 



Environmental Sanitation: 



Environmental sanitation is the control and/or improvement of man's surroundings to better promote 
his physical well-being, comfort, and enjoyment of those surroundings. There are by necessity many 
aspects to environmental sanitation, but those functions generally practiced by this Board concern 
themselves with water, milk, sewage, refuse disposal, housing and recreational area sanitation. 

I. Water Sanitation: 



a. Private Wells 



Number of wells inspected 
Found satisfactory 

Found to be contaminated or with high mineral content 



49 
30 
19 



With the ever -increasing development of the Town and with the ensuing discharge of domestic and 
industrial wastes into the ground water, the possibility of contamination of private water supplies 
becomes more and more possible. It is therefore urged that townspeople have at least a yearly 
analysis of their wells. The Board of Health is equipped to perform this service at no cost or 
obligation. 

b. Municipal System 

Periodic examination of the Town water supply is made by the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Health. Since August 19, I960, when the flouridation program was started up once again, daily 
analyses were performed to determine the concentration of sodium flouride. 



Total number of flouride tests 



II. Milk Sanitation: 



Licensed Dairies 
Pasteurization Plant Inspected 
Samples of Milk & Cream Analyzed 



143 



21 
15 
303 



The bacterial range distribution of milk and flavored milk samples gave the following results upon 
analysis: 



J 

U 
z'i 

0: 

B 
c 



- 500 bacterial colonies/ cc 
501 - 1,000 bacterial colonies/cc 
1,001 - 5,000 bacterial colonies/cc 
5,001 - 10, 000 bacterial colonies/cc 
10,001 - 15,000 bacterial colonies/cc* 
15,001 or over bacterial colonies/cc* 



12 samples 
43 samples 
112 samples 
15 samples 
10 samples 
33 samples 



* Massachusetts Department of Public Health standards for milk and flavored milk drinks are 10, 000 
bacterial colonies or less per cubic centimeter. 



Cream - All Grades 
- 1,000 bacterial colonies/cc 
1,001— 5, 000 bacterial colonies/cc 
5,001 - 10,000 bacterial colonies/cc 
10,001 - 20,000 bacterial colonies/cc 
20,001 - 40, OOGubacterial colonies/cc 
40,001 or over bacterial colonies/cc * 



11 samples 
35 samples 
8 samples 
6 samples 
4 samples 
14 samples 



* Massachusetts Department of Public Health standards allow 40,000 bacterial colonies or less per 
cubic centimeter for cream. 

49 



III. Food Sanitation 



A total of 97 inspections were made on the following food establishments: 



Restaurants 20 

Soda Fountains 5 

Luncheonettes 9 

Submarine Sandwich Shoppes 3 

Ice Cream Manufacturing Establishments 9 

School Cafeterias 7 

Industrial Cafeterias 3 

Mobile Canteens 6 

Bakeries 8 

Grocery and Variety Stores 30 



Monthly inspections and bacteriological tests of utensils used by the public became possible with the 
completion of the Public Health Laboratory in October. With more frequent visits, a very marked 
improvement was noted in sanitary conditions. 

IV. Sewage Disposal Sanitation 



Applications for sewerage permits 130 

Older Dwellings 9 

New Dwellings 112 

Commercial establishments 6 

Churches 2 

Industries 1 

Sewerage systems inspected and approved 103 

Lots restricted for building 4 

Lots on which restrictions were removed 3 



In addition to the above, 13 lots were found unsuitable for the sanitary disposal of sewage. Should 
building be permitted on these lots, a nuisance could eventually be created that would be detrimental 
to the neighborhood. 

V. Refuse Disposal 

Garbage collections and rubbish disposal (through the operation of the town dump) are administered 
by contract through the Board of Health. These public works functions acco\int for over 60% of the 
total Board of Health budget. Inquiries concerning these services should be made to this office. 

VI. Recreational Area Sanitation 

Sanitation at any public or private recreational area is regulated by the Board of Health. Water 
supplies must be safe, sewage disposal must be sanitary, and bathing waters must not be so contami- 
nated as to be injurious to swimmers. There are three recreational areas in town: 

Silver Lake - Public 

Camp Forty Acres - Boy and Girl Scout Camp 

Mill Brook Camp - Commercial and semi-private 

Inspections were made at both camps prior to licensing by the Board of Health. Analyses of the watei 
supplies showed that they were safe for drinking purposes. Due to the fact that the laboratory was 
not yet completed, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health was requested and made several 
analyses of the bathing water at Silver Lake. One analysis made after a weekend showed a high bac- 
terial content. Chlorine was added to water for several weeks with the result that the bacterial con- 
centration was lowered to a point that there was no danger to the health of bathers. 

50 



VII. Housing Sanitation 



In connection with the housing code, a nunnber of dwellings were repaired, remodeled or torn down 
after inspections. With the appointment of a special counsel, hearings were held at District Court 
with the owners of various dwellings condemned as unfit by the Board of Health. Several cases in- 
volving eviction from these dwellings are planned in Superior Court next year. In this year, the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health promulgated further regulations regarding substandard 
dwellings. Whereas these regulations are stricter for the most part than the Wilmington Housing 
Code, it shall be necessary to enforce these new standards. 

Cases presented for Court action 4 

VIII. Nuisance Complaints 

In this period 49 complaints were received and investigated. 

Number 



Complaint 
Sewage 
Dumping 

Unprotected wells 

Animal s 

Food 

Housing 

Atmospheric pollution 
Insect infestation 
Stagnant water 



16 
12 
1 
6 
1 
8 
1 
1 
3 



Abated 

n 

12 
1 
5 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 



IX. Miscellaneous Inspections 



Town Dump 
Recreational Camps 
School Inspection 
*Piggeries 
Stable s 



15 
4 
1 
18 
24 



*Two piggeries were closed this year due to unsanitary conditions found as result of these inspections 
Permits and Licenses 

Two hxindred and eighty-two (282) permits and/or licenses were granted by the Board of Health after 
inspection and approval: 



Refuse transportation permits 


5 


Wholesale manufacture of Ice Cream 


1 


Retail manufacture of Ice Cream 


2 


Milk Dairy Licenses 


21 


Milk Store Licenses 


31 


Oleomargarine Licenses 


9 


Sewerage Installation Permits 


124 


Piggeries 


11 


F\ineral Directing 


4 


Stable Licenses 


16 


Food permits 


52 


Dximps 


2 


Camps 


2 


Anti-freeze 


1 


Salvage 


1 



51 



E. Laboratory 

The Health Officer this year performed a total of 1468 bacteriological and chemical analyses of 
water, dairy products and sterility tests on restaurant utensils. A summary of these analyses 
and comparison with 1959 results are as follows: 

% Satisfactory 





No. 


Satisfactory 


1959 


I960 


Milk and Cream 


887 


768 


92. 1 


86. 6 


Private Wells 


349 


267 


51. 


76. 5 


Town Water (flouride) 


143 


73 


(incomplete) 


51. 


Recreational Camp Wells 


13 


13 


73. 8 


100. 


Stream (bacterial analysis) 


7 









Restaurant Utensils 


45 


35 


70. 8 


77. 7 


Schools: 1/2 pt. school milk 


12 


12 


100. 


100. 


Cafeteria utensils 


12 


10 


100. 


83. 3 



I 

In conclusion, the Board of Health and its personnel wish to express their gratitude to the many \ 
individuals of the Town for their aid and cooperation. The Board of Health is especially indebted to thoS'. 
ladies who so ably assisted at the immunization and polio clinics, Boy and Girl Scouts, and the clergy. 



inspector of animals 



Dog bites reported 

Dogs showing physical signs of rabies 

Animals submitted to laboratory for examination 

(All biting animals were quarantined for the period of time 
prescribed by law. ) 
Animals quarantined 
Animals released from quarantine 
Dogs released from interstate shipment 
Laboratory Report: Positive 

Negative 

Premises keeping domestic animals inspected 

Cattle inspected 

Horses inspected 

Swine inspected 

Goats inspected 

Sheep inspected 

Cattle released from interstate shipment 
Cattle reacting to the tuberculin test 

All special work assigned to me by the Department of Livestock 
Disease Control and the Board of Health was attended to promptly 



SLAUGHTERING INSPECTOR: Nothing to report for I960. 



86 





86 

86 




59 
136 

58 
3867 
9 

14 





52 





board of public welfare 



Board of Public Welfare - left to right, 
Florence A. Balkus, Maurice D. O'Neil, 
Anna M. Low, and Walter F. Coleman. 



The Wilmington Board of Public Welfare respectfully submits its Annual Report for the year I960. 
The Board consists of Mr. Maurice O'Neil, Chairman, Miss Florence Balkus and Mrs. Anna Low. 

The three employees of the Wilmington Board of Public Welfare are Walter F. Coleman, the 
Director of Public Assistance, who also serves as secretary to the Board, Mrs. Miriam Sullivan is the 
senior clerk and stenographer, and Miss Helen Hobson is the social worker. Walter F. Coleman was ap- 
pointed director on November 7, I960, replacing Andrew P. Ring, who resigned October 21, I960. 

The Board of Public Welfare has the second highest appropriation of the various departments in 
the town, and it is hoped that the following report will help explain the reason for these large expenditures 
Df money. 

The categories of assistance supervised by the Board are as follows: General Relief, Aid to 
Dependent Children, Disability Assistance, Old Age Assistance and Medical Assistance for the Aged. The 
ast four are part of the Social Security Act and entitles each community to Federal and State reimburse- 
■nents for part of the aid given under these programs. Each of the above four mentioned categories were 
30rn during successive administrations since the great depression; and in order for a community to receive 
reimbursement under these programs, the various laws passed by the Federal and State governments regu- 
ating payments to the recipients both maximum and minimum must be adhered to, also the various laws 
ind rules regulatirrg accounting procedures to be followed, administration etc. Failure to comply with 
hese various laws and regulations results in disallowances from the State and Federal levels. 

The appropriations requested for 1961 are purely estimates, it being impossible to accurately 
letermine the needs of the department each year. Each administration in Washington for the past several 
ears has increased the benefits received under the Old Age and Survivors Insurance Law (Social Security 
ienefits), but these increases are invariably offset by increased benefits to the recipients in the various 
:ategories supervised by this Board. Another reason for the continued high cost of Public Assistance is 
he continued rise in medical expenditures. This year, 1961, the department will pay more for doctor's 
lome visits and hospital and nursing home care than was being paid at the start of I960. The General 
3ourt of the Commonwealth in I960 also increased the standard budgets for recipients by 5. 1%, increased 
iravel allowance for Old Age Assistance recipients from $2. 50 to $4. 00 a month and added the items of 
ravel allowance of $2. 50 a month and leisure time activities $4. 00 a month to the Disability Assistance 
ludget. The above mentioned increases as heretofore stated are mandatory to all Public Welfare Agencies. 

63 



t. 

IB 
u 

n 

I' 

5f 

t? 

'0 = 

c 




General Relief: 



During I960 there were 34 cases aided \mder this category in Wilmington with an expenditure of | 
$13, 137. 66. This Agency paid $3, 329. 05 to other communities for aid given to Wilmington-settled casei 
Assistance under this program is in most cases of a temporary nature. The few so-called permanent 
cases receiving this type of aid are persons who are not eligible for other types of assistance. The reas 
individuals seek temporary aid in most cases is for illness and unemployment. 

There is no Federal or State reimbursement for aid given under this category, except for paymi . 
received from other communities for individuals who might have a settlement in another community and)' 
aided in Wilmington. Another exception is for persons who have no settlement. This type of case is full' 
reimbursed by the State Department of Public Welfare. Total amount received from other communities 
during I960 was $2, 053. 52. 

Aid to Dependent Children: 

During I960 the local Board aided 21 families on this program. Total expenditures amounted to( 
$30, 315. 12. The Federal and State Governments shared the costs of this type of aid with the Town of 
Wilmington. This type of assistance is granted to widows with dependent children, who are attending 
public schools; to families where the parent has deserted; to families who have a physically incapacitate^ 
parent and to families where the parents are divorced or separated. In all cases where both parents a.rei 
living and the father is not in the home, the father is brought before a Court to determine what portion oi 
the aid he is to pay. The non-support law affecting this type of case is effective in all 50 states and is an 
Federal law. 

Federal reimbursement on this program is held in a special account by the Town Accountant aii 
is used by this category only. The State reimbursement on this program cannot be used on this category 
and is credited to the Excess and Deficiency Account of the Town as an estimated receipt. 

Disability Assistance: 

During I960, nine cases were aided on this category. Total expenditure for I960 on this progj 
was $12, 875. 78. 



The requirement for persons receiving this aid is that the individual be totally and permanent! 
disabled. The person, however, must also meet the other requirements governing this type of aid, i. 
allowable resources, income, etc. , which are requisites of the Federal and State governments and man* 
tory on the local level. The Federal reimbursement on this category is also held in a special account a* 
is used for this program only. 

Old Age Assistance: 

This program has been in existence since the early days of the great depression and has gradiu 
increased in benefits to the recipients and has also increased in cost to the community in spite of the fai 
that the Federal and State governments have increased their share of the cost since its inception. Despf 
the increased cost to the taxpayer on this program, as in the other categories supervised by this Agenc 
the community is the actual beneficiary. Families are kept intact, individuals are rehabilitated, deser 
parents brought to justice and in some instances a reconciliation is arranged, thereby reuniting the fam 
Under the Old Age Assistance program our older citizens receive adequate support and are able to mail 
tain their dignity and self respect. 

During I960 there were 104 cases aided on Old Age Assistance at a cost of $92, 784. 37. The 
Federal grants on this category, as in other federally sponsored programs, is retained in a special 
account and can be used by the Board. The State's share as well as the money received from other cod 
munities is credited to the Excess and Deficiency account as estimated receipts. 



Ik: 



54 



Medical Assistance for the Aged: 



Changes made under the Social Security Act of I960 established a new program of assistance 
called Medical Assistance for the Aged and on November Z3, I960 the General Court of Massachusetts unde 
Chapter 781 accepted this Federal legislation, set up their own plan conforming to the general Federal re- 
quirements. The General Court made it effective immediately, retroactive to October 1, I960, to insure 
the full participation of Federal grants. 

In brief the program is as follows: Aged persons 65 or over, who reside in the Commonwealth 
are entitled to M. A. A. under certain rules and regulations regarding income, resources, etc. , which 
the Board believes would cover too much space to enumerate here. This type of aid covers part or all of 
the cost of (1) in-patient hospital ward care; (2) public medical institution services; (3) nursing home 
services; (4) physician's services; (5) out-patient or clinical services; (6) nursing services; (7) physical 
therapy and related services; (8) dental services; (9) home health care services; (10) laboratory and x-ray 
services; (11) prescribed drugs, eye glasses, dentures and other prosthetic devices; (12) diagnostic and 
preventive services; (13) any other medical care or remedial care recognized under the law of the Common 
wealth; (14) other medical care in accordance with the Department of Public Welfare Medical Care Plan. 

Federal reimbursement on this program is 50% of total aid rendered; 2/3 of the balance by the 
State; the local community pays 1/3 of the balance left after Federal and State payments. These reimburse 
ments are put into the same accounts as the other Federal sponsored programs. The local communities 
were allowed to use the Old Age Assistance Federal funds to carry this program from October 1, I960 to 
December 31, I960 in lieu of a special appropriation. This program aided 16 cases during the last three 
months of I960 with a total expenditure of $6, 050. 46. 

Administration Costs: 



The administration costs cover all expenditures by the Board to administer the five programs 
under the Board's supervision, which are Old Age Assistance, Disability, Aid to Dependent Children, 
Medical Assistance for the Aged and General Relief. Federal reimbursements are based on home visits 
imade and the contacts in the office. All employees in the department are under Civil Service, which is a 
federal requirement. 

The Board wishes to again note that economic conditions govern the amount of monies expended 
under its various programs and that the actual cost is relatively small when compared to the Federal and 
State expenditures in each community; also to recognize the great benefits the community as a whole 
3erives from these various programs and services. 

The local Board at this time would also like to publicly thank the following for their help and co- 
aperation during the year I960: the Fire Department, Police Department, Community Fund, Wilmington- 
Fewksbury Lodge of Elks, employees of AVCO, American Legion and any other organization or person 
;hat aided this department during I960. 

This report was prepared for the local Board of Public Welfare by its Director of Public Assist- 
ince, Walter F. Coleman. 



55 



housing authority 



Veteran's Project: 

The Wilmington Housing Authority has been in existence since 1950; starting with a veteran's pr 
ject of thirteen units (single dwellings) on Wildwood Street. These dwellings consist of seven 2-bedroomi 
and six 3-bedroonn units. 

The basic rent for these dwellings is $49. 00 per month, including the quarterly water charge of ' 
$6. 00 per unit. Any overcharge for water must be paid by the tenant, and he must also furnish his heat 
and light. ^ 

ij 

The Authority is responsible for the maintenance of the dwellings. Any repairs due to other tham 
normal wear are back-charged to the tenant and must be paid with his rent. For the past eight years, 
these dwellings have been occupied continuously with very little loss of revenue due to change of tenants. 
At the present time there are ten applications on file awaiting a vacancy. 

Housing for the Elderly: 

This Project has been a most successful program. It has been in continuous operation for a littl 
over a year without a vacancy. At the present time the demand for apartments is way beyond all expecta- 
tions. The waiting list has increased every month, and at the present time we have applications for fort^ 
apartments. j 

Our Elderly Project has been an inspiration to neighboring towns who are in the process of 
establishing Housing for the Elderly in their communities. 

Urban Renewal: 

Over a period of three years the Authority has been working for the completion of an Urban Rene 
Project in the Town of Wilmington. This program was presented to a Special Town Meeting for approva 

The Town Meeting vote was unfavorable, thereby making it impossible to carry out the proposed 

plan. 

The Wilmington Housing Authority, acting on the mandate of the people, is now in the process of 
closing out the Urban Renewal Project, Mass. R-12. 



56 



Balance Sheet for Year Ending June 30, I960 



iOO-1 



Assets 



Liabilitie s 



Administration Fund 
Petty Cash 
Reading Coop. Bank 
Accounts Receivable 
Prepaid Insurance 
Development Cost 
-liquidated 

TOTAL 



198, 000. 00 
27, 000. 00 



9, 527. 62 
20. 00 

2. 000. 00 
367. 44 
596. 57 

171, 000. 00 

183, 511. 63 



Accrued Comp. to Auth. Mem. 
Accrued Pilot 

Matured Interest & Principal 
Security Deposit 

Bonds Authorized 198,000.00 
Less: Notes Retired 27, OOP. 00 
Debt Service Reserved 
Operating Reserve 

Operating Surplus 

TOTAL 



43. 55 
702. 00 
241. 40 
500. 00 

171 , 000. 00 
4, 753. 00 
4, 763. 77 

182, 003. 72 
1, 507. 91 

183, 51 1. 63 



Balance Sheet for Year Ending March 31, I960 



67-1 Administration 



Assets 



administration Fvmd 

*etty Cash 

.ccounts Receivable 

TOTAL 



Liabilitie s 



15,978. 66 Accrued Insurance 
20. 00 Operating Reserve 
75. 00 

Operating Surplus 

16, 073. 66 

TOTAL 



960. 00 
1, 440. 00 
2, 400. 00 
13, 673. 66 

16, 073. 66 



J 

li 

c : 

0: 
C 



sealer of weights & measures 



Mr. Daniel P. Pike resigned as Sealer of Weights and Measures and was replaced by Mr. Savignac 
June 29, I960. 

Lists of measuring devices and measures adjusted and sealed during the year are as follows: 

No. adjusted No. sealed 

16 
6 



Gasoline pumps 
Grease & oil pumps 
Vehicle tanks 
Taxi meters 

Scales: Under 100 lbs. 6 
Large scales 4 



57 
16 
8 
2 
14 
5 



57 



Street 
Adams Street 
Aldrich Road 
Andover Street 
Auburn Avenue 
Ayotte Street 

Baker Street 
Ballardvale Street 
Bancroft Street 
Beacon Street 
Beech Street 
Beeching Avenue 
Belmont Avenue 
Birchwood Road 
Boutwell Street 
Brand Avenue 
Brattle Street 
Brentwood Avenue 
Bridge Lane 
Broad Street 
Burlington Avenue 
Burnap Street 
Burt Road 
Butters Row 



From 
Middlesex Ave. 
Shaw sheen Ave. 
Salem Street 
Shawsheen Ave. 
Westdale Ave. 

Brand Avenue 
Salem Street 
Liberty Street 
Church Street 
Burlington Ave. 
Cunningham St. 
Columbia Street 
Judith Road 
Aldrich Road 
Bridge Lane 
Massachusetts Ave. 
Woodside Avenue 
Main Street 
Carmel Street 
Main Street 
Grove Avenue 
Cedar Street 
Main Street 



To 

Parker Street 
Billerica Line 
Andover Line 



Miles Feet 



4600 



Andover Line 
B & M R. R. 
Belmont Avenue 
Byron Street 
Faulkner Avenue 
State Street 
Short Street 
Burlington Ave. 
Baker Street 
Garden Avenue 
Woburn Street 
Shawsheen Ave. 
Both Ways 
Burlington Line 
Winchell Road 
Fall Street 
Chestnut Street 



1. 2 

2. 3 



2. 7 



0. 8 



0. 3 



1. 6 



800 
800 

700 

400 
1000 
1000 

450 
1000 
1550 

2370 
1 100 
907 

1377 

1378 
2500 



0. 6 



Date(s) Accepted 

3-02-08 
11-06-94 
11-06-94 

3-12-45 

3-10-47 

3-12-45 
11-06-94 
3-17-52 
3-01-15 
3-10-47 
3-14-59 
3-03-33 

3-17-52 3-10-53 
11-06-94 3-12-60 

3-13-33 3-08-43 

3-12-45 

6-21-38 
1 1-06-94 

3-13-54 
1 1-06-94 

3-12-45 3-10-53 

3-12-45 3-11-46 
11-06-94 



58 



A. <C (C K ff>T K DD 2E IT ffi K K T S 



Street 
Canal Street 
Carolyn Road 
Carson Avenue 
Carter Lane 
Cedar Street 
Central Street 
Chandler Road 
Chapnnan Avenue 
phase Road 
Chestnut Street 
Church Street 
Clark Street 
Cochrane Road 
Columbia Street 

oncord Street 
Congress Street 
ook Avenue 
oolidge Road 
orey Avenue 
3ottage Street 
!^ross Street 
Cunningham Street 
Jypress Street 

)avis Street 
Dayton Road 
)ell Drive 



From 
Shaw sheen Avenue 
North Street 
Hathaway Road 
Shaw sheen Avenue 
Harris Street 
Middlesex Avenue 
Kelly Road 
Hathaway Road 
Hathaway Road 
Burlington Avenue 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Forest Street 
Church Street 
Federal Street 
Forest Street 
Main Street 
Hathaway Road 
Grand Street 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Salem Street 
Glen Road 

Main Street 
Hathaway Road 
Burlington Ave. 



To 
Burt Road 
Linda Road 
Both Ways 

Burt Road 
Church Street 
Adams Street 



Woburn Line 
Middlesex Ave. 
Church Street 
Warren Road 
Talbot Avenue 
N. Reading Line 
Burlington Line 
Kensington Ave. 

Canal Street 

Lowell Street 
Beeching Avenue 



Miles Feet 
1511 
950 
677 
1400 
600 
574 
400 
322 
297 

2. 1 

0. 8 

0. 8 

800 

0. 1 

1. 1 

965 
1000 
270 
370 
920 
900 
2320 
260 



Date(s) Accepted 
10-16-39 3-12 
3-12-60 

3-10-53 3-12 

3-09-57 

3-12-45 

10- 16-50 
3-09-57 
3-05-51 
3-10-53 

1 1- 06-94 
1 1-06-94 
11-06-94 

3-10-47 

3-02-08 3-13 
11-06-94 

10- 16-39 
3-11-46 
3-05-51 
3-05-51 
3-13-54 

1 1- 06-94 

3/44 3/52 3/53 
3-05-51 



500 3-17-52 
170 3-05-51 
450 3-08-58 



59 



A C C E 1" T E EJ) STffiEEirS 



Street 

Dobson Street 
Dorchester Street 
Dorothy Avenue 
Draper Drive 
Dublin Avenue 
Dunton Road 

Eames Street 
Edwards Road 
Emerson Street 



From 
Glen Road 
Billerica I^ine 
Barbara Avenue 
Gunderson Road 
Main Street 
Nassau Avenue 

Main Street 
Forest Street 
Oakwood Road 



To 

Gary Street 
Arlene Avenue 



Miles Feet 



Both Ways 

Woburn Street 
Baldwin Road 
Faulkner Avenue 



0. 7 



1402 
1400 
1556 
100 
500 
638 

450 
600 



Date(s) Accepted 
3-13-54 
3-05-51 
3-12-60 
3-14-59 
3-05-51 
3-10-56 

1 1-06-94 
3-10-47 
3-05-51 



Fairfield Avenue 
Fair meadow Road 
Fairview Avenue 
Faneuil Drive 
Faulkner Avenue 
Fay Street 
Federal Street 
Forest Street 

Glen Road 
Glendale Circle 
Glenview Road 
Gowing Road 
Grand Street 
Grant Street 
Grove Avenue 
Gunderson Road 



Main Street 
Nichols Street 
State Street 
Massachusetts Ave. 
Glen Road 
Glen Road 
Middlesex Avenue 
Aldrich Road 

Main Street 
Glen Road 
Suncrest Avenue 
Park Street 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Federal Street 
Main Street 
Hathaway Road 



Nichols Street 



W . Jamaica Ave. 
Gary Street 
Woburn Street 
Burlington Ave. 

Middlesex Ave. 
Glen Road 

Marcus Road 

Dunmore Road 

B & M R. R. 

Lake Street 

Both Ways 
60 



1. 1 

0. 8 

1. 3 



1300 
2328 

650 
1000 
2671 

700 



0. 4 



1300 
360 
900 
850 
780 

1081 



3- 1 1-46 
3-08- 38 
3-13-33 

10- 16-50 
3-13-44 
6-21-38 

1 1- 06-94 
11-06-94 

1 1-06-94 
3-17-52 
3-14-59 
3-10-56 
3-17-52 
3-08-43 
9-29-10 
3-14-59 



3-10 
3-12 



A. C (C E ff'T K HD STffiKETS 



Street 
Harnden Street 
Harris Street 
Harvard Avenue 
Hathaway Road 
Hawthorne Road 
High Street 
Hillside Way 
Hilltop Road 
Hobson Avenue 

Hopkins Street 
! Hubbard Street 

Jaquith Road 
Jone s Avenue 
Judith Rqad 

Kelly Road 
Kendall Street 
Kiernan Avenue 
Kilmarnock Street 
King Street 
Kirk Street 



From 
Main Street 
Burlington Avenue 
Mam Street 
Woburn Street 
Woburn Street 
Middle sex Ave. 
Chestnut Street 
Suncrest Avenue 
Pine Avenue 

Shaw sheen Ave. 
Aldrich Road 

Shawsheen Ave. 
Glen Road 
Birchwood Road 

Adams Street 
Aldrich Road 
Main Street 
West Street 
Glen Road 
Main Street 



To 
Glen Road 
Cedar Street 
River Street 
Gunderson Road 

Woburn Street 
Burlington Line 

150 feet beyond 
Wiser Street 

Billerica Line 

Lubbers Brook 



Miles Feet 



0. 1 



Cedar Crest Road 

Blanchard Road 

Reading Line 
Broad Street 



0. 5 

0. 5 



0. 5 



700 
430 
1858 
230 



0. 5 



364 
1520 

250 

1250 
719 
520 

923 
1300 
693 

2400 
572 



Date(s) Accepted 
3-04-95 
3-12-45 
3-05-51 

3/51 3/53 3/59 
3-10-56 
11-06-94 
3-02-14 
3-14-59 

3/45 3/51 3/52 
11-06-94 
3-05-51 

3-08-48 3/49 3/51 

6-10-40 

3-10-53 

3-09-57 
3-12-45 
3-08-58 
1 1-06-94 

6-10-40 3-12-45 
3-05-51 



2? 

'c c 
c 

l 



Lake Street 
Lang Street 
iLaurel Avenue 
Lawrence Court 



Main Street 
Bancroft Street 
Malloy Road 
Lawrence Street 



Shawsheen Ave. 
B & M R. R. 
Parker Street 



1. 



400 
657 
68 3 



11-06-94 
3-17-52 

10-16-50 
3-10-56 



61 



ACCEF*TKID) S T ffi K K T ffi 



Street 
Lawrence Street 
Ledgewood Road 
Liberty Street 
Lincoln Street 
Linda Road 
Lloyd Road 
Lockwood Road 
Longview Road 
Lowell Street 

Mackey Road 
Main Street 
Marcus Road 
Marion Street 
Marjorie Road 
Massachusetts Ave. 
McDonald Road 
Meadow Lane 
Middlesex Avenue 
Miles Street 
Miller Road 
Morse Avenue 
Mystic Avenue 

Nassau Avenue 
Nichols Street 
Nicker son Ave. 



From 
Glendale Circle 
Suncrest Avenue 
Federal Street 
Federal Street 
High Street 
Main Street 
Ballardvale Street 
Middlesex Avenue 
Main Street 

Federal Street 
Tewksbury Line 
Gowing Road 
Burlington Ave. 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Salem Street 
Suncrest Avenue 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Glen Road 
Woburn Street 
Middlesex Avenue 

Shawsheen Avenue 
Shaw sheen Avenue 
West Street 



To. 

Shady Lane Drive 

B & M R. R. 
B & M R. R. 



Reading' Line 

Woburn Line 
Gowing Road 



St. Paul Street 



Salem Street 
Hob son Avenue 
Emerson Street 



Miles Feet 
3773 
383 
740 
720 
1780 
1050 
990 
650 

1. 9 



4. 



2. 3 



Decatur Street 
Shawsheen River 



0. 7 



250 

2315 
900 

1550 
800 

1424 
363 

400 
640 
1361 
598 

2000 
900 



Date(s) Accepted 
3-10-56 
3-14-59 
3-08-43 
3-08-43 

10- 16-50 
3-05-51 
3-09-57 
3-14-59 

11- 06-94 

3-08-43 
11-06-94 

3-08-58 

3-12-45 

3-05-51 

3-12-45 

3-13-44 

3-09-57 
11-06-94 

3-12-45 

3-12-45 

10- 16-39 
3-02-08 

3-] 1-46 

11- 06-94 
3-10-47 



62 




Street 
Norfolk Street 
North Street 

Oak Street 
Oakdale Road 
Oakridge Circle 
Oakwood Road 
Olson Street 

Park Street 
Parker Street 
Patricia Circle 
Pershing Street 
Phillips Avenue 
Pilling Road 
Pine Avenue 
Pineridge Road 
Pineview Road 
Pinewood Road 
Powder House Circle 

Railroad Avenue 
Ridge Road 
Rollins Road 
Roosevelt Road 
Royal Street 



From 
Carter Lane 
Middlesex Avenue 

Salem Street 
Judith Road 
Cowing Road 
Main Street 
Church Street 

Woburn Street 
Lowell Street 
Dell Drive 
Federal Street 
Wiser Street 
Hathaway Road 
Main Street 
North Street 
Lipp Street 
Birchwood Road 
Middlesex Avenue 

Clark Street 
Suncrest Avenue 
Fenway Street 
Boutwell Street 
Salem Street 



To 

Nassau Avenue 
Dadant Drive 



Miles Feet Date(s) Accepted 
538 3-13-54 
3533 3-12-45 3-13-54 



Short Street 
Cowing Road 
Fairfield Avenue 

N. Reading Line 0. 9 

Blackstone Street 0. 36 

Dell Drive 

B & M R. R. 

Wild Avenue 

Both ways 

Hobson Avenue 

Linda Road 

Adelman Road 

Shady Lane Drive 

Stone Street 0. 2 

Marion Street 
Burlington Avenue 



350 
2280 
1730 
850 
132 



595 
720 

1800 
930 
400 
900 
450 

1332 
730 

365 
200 
2000 
1040 



3-19-51 

10- 16-50 
3-08-58 
3-11-46 
3-09-57 

11- 06-94 
3-04-07 
3-08-58 
3-08-43 
3- 11-46 
3-14-59 
3-12-45 
3-12-60 
3-10-53 
3-13-54 
3-13-54 

3-01-09 
3-10-56 
3-13-54 
3-1 1-46 
3-05-51 



3-03-19 



3-13-54 



J 

c 



63 



A C C ffi IP X E; ID) STffiKETS 



Street 
Salem Street 
School Street 
Sewell Road 
Shady Lane Drive 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Sheridan Road 
Silver Lake Avenue 
Sprucewood Road 
State Street 
Strout Avenue 
Suncrest Avenue 
Swain Road 



From 
Tewksbury Line 
Middlesex Avenue 
Hathaway Road 
Middlesex Avenue 
Main Street 
Hathaway Road 
Lake Street 
Shady Lane Drive 
Belmont Avenue 
Lowell Street 
West Street 
Forest Street 



To 

N. Reading Line 
High School Lot 

Lawrence Street 
Billerica Line 

Dexter Street 
Short Street 
Fairview Avenue 



Miles Feet 



2. 7 



2. 2 



616 
380 

2676 

487 
455 
600 
275 
686 
1246 



Burlington Ave. 



0. 4 



Date(s) Accepted 
11-06-94 3-05-0 

3-01-15 

3-12-55 

3-08-58 
1 1-06-94 

3-05-51 

3-13-54 

3-17-52 

3-03-33 

3-17-55 

3-13-54 

3-20-22 10-16-2 



Taft Road 
Taplin Avenue 
Temple Street 
Thurston Avenue 
Truman Road 



Burlington Ave. 
Hobson Avenue 
Church Street 
Church Street 
Hathaway Road 



Boutwell Street 
Lubbers Brook 



0. 2 



3237 
900 
274 

300 



6-21-38 
3-11-46 
6-06-11 
3-04-07 
3-10-53 



Upton Court 



Andover Street 



0. 1 



11-06-94 



Veranda Avenue 
Virginia Road 



Main Street 

N. Reading Line 



Lubbers Brook 



1076 3-06-16 
1200 3-13-54 



Walker Street 
Warren Road 
Washington Ave. 
West Street 



Main Street 
Lake St. , Tewksbury 
Clark Street Chase Street 

Woburn Street Reading Line 

64 



0. 3 

1. 7 



423 
100 



3-08-58 
3-13-54 
3-01-20 
1 1-06-94 



M. (C az e: w IT w, M sthrekts 



Street 
Westdale Avenue 
Wightman Road 
Wild Avenue 
Wildwood Street 
Williams Avenue 
Wilson Street 
ATinchell Road 
ffing Road 
Viser Street 
Voburn Street 
IVoodlawn Avenue 



From 
West Street 
Warren Road 
Grove Avenue 
Middlesex Avenue 
Main Street 
Federal Street 
Grove Avenue 
Woburn Street 
Mam Street 
Andover Street 
Border Avenue 



To 

B & M R. R . 
Albert Street 
B & M R. R. 
Woburn Street 

B & M R. R. 

Burnap Street 

Taplin Avenue 
Woburn Line 
Kensington Ave. 



Miles Feet 
1211 
230 

0. 2 

1. 1 

693 
760 
200 
746 
900 

4. Z 

250 



Date(s) Accepted 

6-22-42 

3-13-54 
12-29-10 
1 1-06-94 

6-10-40 

3-08-43 

3-12-45 

3-08-58 

10- 16-50 

11- 06-94 
3-17-52 



veterans" agent 



During I960 this department processed 108 applications for monetary aid, as follows: 
Chapter 115 as amended: 

24 applications were referred to other cities or towns 
10 applications were rejected 

74 applications were approved for aid totaling over $27, 000 

This represents an increase in the number of cases handled. This year again shows an increase 
tithe family budgets under the State program. Of a total of $27,000 spent, more than $6,000 was paid 
irectly to hospitals. Over $16, 000 was paid to veterans and their dependents who were unable to work 
ecause of illness or age limitations. In contrast, less than $5, 000 was spent on veterans who were 
Bmporarily out of work. 

Through the cooperation of the Welfare Agents, Mr. Ring and Mr. Coleman, and the Wilmington 
ommunity Fund, this department was able to care for a number of cases who might otherwise have gone 
ithout help due to being ineligible under the Veterans Benefits Law. 



65 



IB 
i. 

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E 



JURY LIST 
Revised - August 31, I960 



Name 

Ainsworth, Lillian 
Andersen, Dorothy R. 
Anderson, Robert E. 
Ardolino, Ernest E. 
Babine, Helen V. 
Baldwin, Gertrude E. 
Bates, Donald A. 
Blake, Arnold C. 
Blakeslee, William R. 
Braman, Marion V. 
Buck, Mildred H. 
Buckle, Thomas G. 
Bull, Jane A. 
Butt, Mabel 
Cantrell, Cecil W. Jr. 
Curtm, Pauline A. 
Cavanaugh, Robert L. 
Coursey, Charles H. 
Creelman, Alice M. 
Cyrus, George S. 
DiCampo, AlmericoT. 
DeVita, Francis L. 
Domenicis, Arthur A. 
Doo, Burton 
Doucette, Henry O. 
Dowling, Lawrence H. 
Downing, Ernest H. 
Drover, Dorothy E. 
Dyas, Marjorie L. 
Fay, Isabella R . 
Elliott, John E. 
Elwell, Russell T. 
Foley, Philip M. 
Foye, John E. 
Fritz, Ferdinand E. 
Fuller, Mary L. 
Gomes, Louis V. Jr. 
Graham, Ernest M. 
Gratcyk, Ruth M. 
Gustus, Walter J. 
Hall, Webster R. 
Hodgdon, Parker E. 
Ingram, Athlea E. 
Jepson, Mildred L. 
Johnson, Frank W. Jr . 
Keen, William J. 
Keller, Richard D. 
Kemp, John S. 
LaDow, Chester F. 
Lapper, John C. 
■'indicates married woman) 



Re sidence 

15 Shawsheen Road 
Park Street 

859 Main Street 

Broad Street 

56 High Street 

7 Jones Avenue 

7 Drury Lane 

90 Middlesex Avenue 

10 Hathaway Road 

4 Fairmeadow Road 

295 Woburn 

80 Church Street 

38 Burlington Avenue 

6 West Street 
60 High Street 
261 Glen Road 

9 Powder House Circle 
Wing Road 

571 Woburn Street 
McDonald Road 
719 Woburn Street 

10 Lockwood Road 
Seaford Street 

16 Lawrence Court 
31 Ballardvale Street 
4 Hawthorne Road 

9 Adams Street 
4 Hilltop Road 
41B Lake Street 
18 Brand Avenue 
102 Lake Street 
Shady Lane Drive 
Westdale Avenue 
73 West Street 
18 Fairmeadow Road 
147 Main Street 
14 Marion Street 
49 Lawrence Street 
34 Grove Avenue 
16 Brand Avenue 
Linda Road 

7 Harris Street 
9 Wing Road 

136 Fames Street 
47 West Street 
Westdale Avenue 
4 West Street 
150 West Street 
3 Ledgewood Road 
20 Glendale Circle 



Occupation 

Housewife 
Housewife 
Self employed 
Supervisor 
Assistant Cook 
Saleslady 
•Technical Writer 
Professional Engineer 
Foreman 

Accts. Rec. Clerk 

Assistant - Sales Dept. 

Clerk 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Fiscal Officer - Accountant 
Housewife 

Electronic Technician 
Assistant Section Head 
Housewife 
Chef 

Decennial Field Assistant 
Machini st 

Building Superintendent 

Supervisor 

Retired 

Supervi sor 

Shipwright 

Nur se ' s Aid 

Senior Clerk 

Assistant Bookkeeper 

Maintenance 

Yard Foreman 

Marine Pipefitter 

Shipwright 

Millman 

Meat Packer 

Cabinet Finisher 

Project Engineer 

Church Secretary 

Foreman 

Engineer 

Assistant Engineer 
Technician 
Sale swoman 
Repairman 

Insurance Underwriter 

Newspaper Web Pressman 

Chief Engineer 

Tumbler 

Draftsman 



66 



Name 



Re sidence 



Occupation 



LaRivee, Rene J. 

Lawler, Walter A. 

Lawrence, Robert H. 

Leonard, Thomas P. Jr. 

Lister, Gordon K. 

MacFeeley, Angus B. 

MacFeeley, Patricia A. 

McClure, Raymond G. 

McLellan, George H. Jr. 

McLellan, Lurlyne B. 

Melanson, Robert L. 

Metcalf, Paul T. 

Mills, Florence E. 

Moore, Arthur 

Moore, Thomas H. 

Moore s, Allan W. 

Moores, Mildred 

Mosey, Evelyn B. 

Murphy, Francis L. 

Nelson, Frank J. Jr. 

Oatley, Michelena R. 

Oberg, Carl H. 

Oberg, Carl H. Jr. 

O'Handley, Gertrude C. 

O'Neill, Ruth E. 

Page, Ruth M. 

Palmer, Douglas 

Palmer, James T. 

Pearson, Arthur W. 

Peterson, Catherine B. 
' Pike, Emma D. 

Pilla, Alexander T. 

Pipes, Ruby H. 

Piatt, Alan son E. 

Quinn, George F. 

Rees, John F. 

Reynolds, Helen M. 

Riccelli, Carmen J. 

Rice, Dorothy F. 

Richard, Lydia 
"Riley, Veronica A. 

Ring, John S. 

Robinson, Frank E. 

Russell, William H. 

Savko, John J. 

Seddon, Dorothy I. 

Seitz, Erne st R . 

Shanniak, Mabel M. 

Sharp, Norman R. 

Sharp, Walter E. 

Sidelinker, Eva 

Solow, Harry, Jr. 

Stowe, Ernest B. 

Sullivan, Edward J. 

indicates married woman) 



64 Concord Street 

I 5 Swain Road 

I I Linda R oad 

7 Fairfield Road 
27 Woburn Street 
77 Burnap Street 
77 Burnap Street 
99 Chestnut Street 
13 Ferguson Road 

13 Ferguson Road 
Fairview Avenue 

30 Brentwood Avenue 
Westdale Avenue 

5 Ledgewood Road 

14 Gunderson Road 
Westdale Avenue 
Westdale Avenue 

1 1 Lawrence Street 
7 Carson Avenue 
Christine Drive 
142 West Street 
Perry Ave. Extension 
Perry Ave. Extension 
742 Woburn Street 

4 Cypress Street 
1 6 Deming Way 
12'± West Street 
124 West Street 
22 Oakdale Road 
119 Grove Avenue 
Westdale Avenue 
310 Lowell Street 
300 Chestnut Street 

5 Sheridan Road 

34 Brentwood Avenue 
34 Andover Street 
833 Woburn Street 
95 Shawsheen Avenue 
380 Main Street 
Taft Road 

2 Cottage Street 

277 Middlesex Avenue 

Bates Avenue 

10 Wildwood Street 

31 Lawrence Street 
40 Oakdale Road 
711 Woburn Street 
109 West Street 
Larson Road 
Larson Road 

72 Main Street 
Salem Street 

3 Meadow Lane 
38 Grove Avenue 

67 



Test Mechanic 

Project Technician 

Clerk, Timekeeper 

Prod. Planning & Control Supr 

Supervisor 

Sheet Metal Assembly 

Legal Secretary 

Data Processing Analyst 

Project Engineer 

Housewife 

Brick Layer 

Sheet Metal Worker 

Housewife 

Instrument Maker 

Checker 

Accountant - Office Manager 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Building Custodian 

Supervisor 

Housewife 

Retired 

Lab. Technician 

Insurance Change Checker 

Housewife 

Unemployed 

Retired 

Lineman 

Senior Electronics Technician 

Cashier 

Housewife 

Supervisor 

Housewife 

Assistant Civil Engineer 
Sale sman 

I. B. M. Supervisor 

Payroll Clerk 

Post Office Clerk 

Payroll Clerk 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Welder 

Supervisor of Maintenance 
Clerk 

Inspector - Construction 
Practical Nurse 
Salesman 

Accts. Rec. Bookkeeper 
Bakery Receiver 
General Helper 
Shoe Packer 
General worker 
Campaign Organizer 
Newspaper Correspondent 



Name 



Residence 



Occupation 



Syvertson, Roy C. Jr. 
Tattersall, Elizabeth 
Trickett, David W. 
Tuttle, Frank H. 
Visconti, Anna M. 
Wagstaff, Anna 
Wagstaff, Bernard F. 
Walsh, Michael J. 
Webber, George J. 
Whalen, James J. 
Wicks, Lydia G. 
Witherspoon, William E. 
^indicates married woman) 



21 1 Wildwood Street 
19 Grove Avenue 

11 Suncrest Avenue 
Carson Avenue 

22 Nassau Avenue 
34 Hobson Avenue 
Pleasant Road 

5 Dorothy Avenue 

160 Shawsheen Avenue 

Birchwood Road 

27 Parker Street 

17 Swain Road 



Sheet Metal Mechanic 
At home 
Electrician 

Senior Design Checker 
Claim Clerk 
Housewife 
Sale smanger 
Electrician 

Equip. Planning Engineer 
Supervisor 
Transister Tester 
Retired 




Finance Connmittee - left to right, 
John G. Hayward, Ralph H. Biggar, 
Carl Gubellini, William P. Curtin, 
Robert Michelson, Cornelius Joyce, 
and William A. Stickney. 



68 



L 

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POLICE DEPARTMENT 




Police Chief Lynch 




Officer Markey Officer Mercier Officer Peterson Officer Ritchie 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 




Private Nee Private Plumer Private Wandell Private Webster 




school Committee 



School Committee - left to right, 
George Robertie, Robert Hastings, 
Ernest Crispo, Henry Sullivan, 
John Hartnett, Edward F. Page, 
and School Supt. Harold S. Shea. 



In accordance with Chapter 72, Section 4, of the General Laws Relating to Education of the State of 
Massachusetts, we hereby submit the annual report of the Wilnaington School Connmittee for the year I960. 



The membership of the Committee was as follows: 

Henry Sullivan, Chairman 

Ernest M. Crispo, Vice Chairman 

George G. Robertie, Secretary 

John F. Hartnett 

Robert F. Hastings 

Edward F. Page 

Arthur V. Lynch (resigned 1/21/60) 



Term Expires 
1961 
1963 
1961 
1963 
1962 
1962 



Of major significance this past year was the resignation of John J. Collins, Superintendent of 
Schools, to accept a similar position in Goshen, New York. School Committee members and townspeople 
alike agree that during his tenure of office, six years to be exact, the Wilmington Public Schools grew in 
stature and in excellence. 



c 



To replace Mr. Collins, your School Committee reviewed sixty applications, interviewed sixteen 
candidates, and finally elected Harold S. Shea, Director of Secondary Education, Fairfield, Connecticut. 



Other activities of educational significance which your committee was engaged in during the year 
were as follows: 



9 teachers were elected to tenure 



27 teachers were appointed to fill staff vacancies, 13 elementary 
and 14 secondary. Of the 27 appointments, 9 were for new 
positions because of growth and 18 were replacements due to 
resignations and leaves of absence. 

3 staff members were granted leaves of absence. 

The opening of the Boutwell Street School, a twelve room elementary school, in October of I960, 
although causing half sessions for six weeks for some 350 pupils, hag kept the town abreast of its long 



73 



range school building progrann. This was followed up by the appropriation of $1, 050, 000. 00 by the voters 
at a special town nneeting in November for the construction of an Intermediate School on Salem Street in 
North Wilmington to be ready for occupancy in September of 1962. The latter school will not only take car 
of the continued need for elementary classrooms in the next few years but also meet the first crush of an 
expanding grade 7-8 population now housed in the high school. The school is to be designed and construct 
for the eventual use as a grade 7-8 school only. To bring about these accomplishments, your Committee 
has worked in close cooperation with members of the Permanent Building Committee who, as you know, ' 
are responsible for the construction of all town buildings. 

Membership in the New England School Development Council continues to provide the school ad- 
ministration and staff with the latest research in curriculum planning, school financing, teachers salaries, 
student activities, and policy making; and its services are invaluable in helping the staff and the Committee 
to determine which direction the schools should move in planning long range educational goals for the town. , 

Participation in the evaluation of the Wilmington High School by a Visiting Committee assigned by | 
the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, and subsequent discussions with the high 
school principal and department heads at regular School Committee meetings, provided the committee with : 
first-hand knowledge on the status of our high school. A summary of the findings of the Visiting Committee! 
is reported elsewhere in this report. i 

Schools were in session 180 days beginning September 9, 1959 and ending June 2Z, I960. 

The Committee held 25 regular meetings and 5 special meetings during the year. 

The School Committee wishes to thank the various committees, town departments, and the many 
individual citizens who have been so cooperative and helpful to the school department during the past year. 



REQUIRED 



CLASSROOM NEEDS 



AVAILABLE 



PROVIDE 





1-6 


7-8 


9-12 


Total 


1-6 


7-12 


Total 


1-6 


7-8 


I960 


67 


18 


27 


112 


71 


46 


117 


12 




1961 


72 


19 


30 


121 


71 


46 


117 






1962 


78 


19 


31 


128 


71 


66 


137 




20 


1963 


84 


20 


34 


138 


71 


66 


137 






1964 


87 


22 


34 


143 


79 


66 


145 


8 




1965 


93 


23 


34 


150 


87 


66 


153 


8 




1966 


(99) 


24 


37 


( 160) 


102 


66 


168 


15 




1967 


aos) 


26 


37 


(168) 


102 


66 


168 






1968 


(III) 


29 


39 


(179) 


102 


86 


188 




20 


1969 




30 


42 














1970 




31 


48 














1971 




32 


53 














1972 






55 















9-12 



74 



i^pt of i«c*hool 




SUPT. OF SCHOOLS 
Harold S. Shea 



Teachers and school administrators must carry out the every day job of education; must determine 
the best ways of teaching; must determine how existing plant facilities can be utilized; must bring to the 
students their trained knowledge and experience. In this, my first annual report, I shall attempt to sum- 
marize for you how this job was carried out this past year in Wilmington, and how it might be carried out 
in the years ahead. Included also in this report is the usual data pertaining to school enrollments, class- 
room needs, and condition of school facilities. 

AT THE ELEMENTARY LEVEL 

School Organization: 

Due to the increase in the number of classrooms, and the consequent need for a more equitable 
distribution of supervisory responsibilities, the elementary districts were redefined as follows, effective 
September 1, I960: 

Glen Road District: (Comprising the Glen Road, Rogers and Buzzell Schools) 

Mr. Barrett as Supervising Principal. 

Swain District: (Comprising the Swain, Center and Boutwell Schools) 

Mr. DeLuca as Supervising Principal. 

Wildwood District: (Comprising the Wildwood, Whitefield and Walker Schools) 

Mr. Amborse as Supervising Principal. 



Curriculum: 

During the year, there was very much activity with reference to curriculum, text additions, and 
changes. The adoption of a new Arithmetic series was completed, covering grades one through six. The 
Language Committee, which undertook many studies in 1959, completed its detailed report covering grades 
three through six. As a result, a new text was adopted and first used in September. The entire elemen- 
tary system will be utilizing the text in 1961. A new Social Studies series was initiated into the sixth 
grades. The new text brings about an improved fusion of Geography and History, with greater emphasis on 
Geography. This new series makes it possible to effect a better correlation with the High School program. 



75 



The Educational TV programs have been used effectively to supplennent the basic curriculunn. The 
instruction for the elementary grades covers the following areas: 



Grade 6: 



Grade 5: 



Grade 4: 
Grade 3: 
Grade 2: 



Physical Science (all classes) 

Second-year Conversational French for those having had the first year 

in 1959-1960 
Natural Science (all classes) 

First-year Conversational French by those teachers who conducted 

experimental classes during 1959-1960 
First-year Conversational French (all classes) 
Literature (all classes) 
Music (optional) 



In addition to these, a program in Primary Science will be added for the first and second grades 
beginning in January, 1961. The Conversational French program is still in the experimental stage and, 
in an attempt to make the program more effective, a representative from the Modern Language Project 
will conduct a workshop for all teachers using the program. This workshop, commencing in December, 
will continue on a monthly basis for the latter part of the school year. 

With the opening of schools in September of this past year, the Remedial Reading program was 
extended to include children at fourth grade level. Recommendation for this revision had been favorably 
considered during the previous school year. However, because such a change, if carried out at that time, 
would have resulted in class numbers exceeding effective working groups, it was necessary to continue 
with the original program which was set up for grades five and six only. 

Reporting to Parents: 

In an effort to give the parents a better understanding of the pupil's scholastic development, the 
report card for grades four, five and six was revised. The new report card provides an explanation of the 
mark received, by affording the teacher an opportunity to show the strengths and weaknesses of the student 
in the most important areas of each subject. 

To give a more complete picture of the overall program at the end of the third and sixth grades, 
the standardized achievement test, formerly given during the fall to pupils in these grades, was scheduled 
to be given during the spring. The upward trend in the achievement of our pupils was again indicated with 
the median scores in all areas being well above grade level. 

In-service Training: 

Beginning in January, an in-service course for elementary teachers will be conducted by 
Miss Marion Gorham of Concord on new methodology of teaching elementary arithmetic. This course is 
expected to supplement the change in arithmetic teaching which was introduced a few years ago with the 
adoption of a new text. 

Student Health: 

Vision and hearing testing is an integral part of the school health program. These screening pro- 
cedures, including a school examination, are a means for reaching specific goals. These goals are: 
securing a better understanding of the pupil, helping him to attain greater physical effectiveness, and in- 
creasing his understanding of ways of living healthfully. 



76 



Vi sion Te sts: 
Enrollment 
Nunnber Tested 
Final Failures 



3, 081 
3, 074 
171 



Hearing Tests: 
Enrollment 
Number Tested 
Final Failures 



3, 081 
3, 061 
145 



These figures are for September, 1959, through June, I960. 

Mantoux Tests , February I960: 

(Conducted for the purpose of detection and control of 
tuberculosis). 

Grades Tested 1, 4 and 7 

Number Tested 841 
Number Positive 6 



Dental Health Program: 

The school dental health program aims to help children and youth appreciate the importance of a 
clean mouth, free from disease and abnormalities. It motivates them to assume responsibility for per- 
sonal care. The school's role in achieving these objectives involves instruction and counseling. 

Fluorine Program 1959-1960 : 

(Cleanings, examinations, and fluorine treatments) 
Grade 2 21Z 
Grade 5 22Z 
Grade 8 139 
Total 



573 pupils treated 
2, 292 fluorine treatments 



Restorative Program 1959-1960: 
(Cleanings and examinations) 
Grade 1 

Grade 1 (Restorative Visits) 



School Physical Examinations: 



Grades Examined 
N\imber Examined 



180 
476 



1, 4, 9, and 12 

758 



I Summer Opportunities: 

It is the consensus of opinion among the regiilar classroom teachers that students who attended 
the Summer School definitely have profited by the experience. It is also their opinion that the Summer 
Reading Course has been a very worthwhile project. The majority of the students responded to the indivi- 
dual attention, and the test results show their gains. The resvilts which do not show are the feelings within 
[the students themselves and the sense of satisfaction and security which the teachers have been able to give 
them. One hundred forty-four were enrolled this past summer for a period of six weeks. 




AT THE HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL 



This year the annual report will deal with evaluation of Wilmington High School conducted in May 
by a Visiting Connnnittee assigned by the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. The 
findings are lengthy, and it is the intent of the writer to condense them without being obscure. 

An evaluation covers seven major are as: 

The Program of Studies; Subject Fields; Pupil Activity Program; Library Services; Guidance 
Services; School Plant; and School Staff and Administration. The ratings are as follows: 



1- 2 Poor, Fair 

2- 3 Fair, Good 

3- 4 Good, Very Good 
5 Excellent 



The Program of Studies was rated 3. 3: 



The Committee commended the curriculum revisions; the four year sequence in foreign languages 
the offering of F rench, Home Economics, and Industrial Arts in Grades 7 and 8. They recommended that 
more pupils be permitted to pursue Art, Music. Home Economics, and Industrial Arts; establish remedial 
work in all departments and set up minimum standards for sequential subjects. 

In the Subject Fields the following ratings were established: 

Art 4. 1; Business Education 4. 1; English 4. 2; Foreign Language 4. 1; Home Economics 3. 3; 
Industrial Arts 3. 9; Mathematics 3. 6; Music 3. 3; Physical Education 3. 7; Science 3. 4; Social Studies 4 

The Committee commended the Business Education Department for their energy and drive in the 
classrooms, the number of boys following a business course, the high percentage of job placement. They 
recommended minimum standards for business courses and follow-up study of graduates and business re- 
quirements. The Committee commended the English Department for the excellent writing and reading pro 
grams and the thorough training in basic skills of English. They recommended recruiting experienced 
teachers for college preparatory divisions; establish development reading; consider establishing an accele 
rated course in English with a view to an Advanced Placement Class. This course would enable students 
to complete a course of college freshman caliber and to receive credit for this course. The Committee 
commended the Foreign Language Department in its teaching methods, the exclusive use of the language 
by teacher and pupil, and the broad coverage of the foreign language program. They recommended use 
of Prognostic Tests and expansion of the number of periods in seventh and eighth grade French. 



The Committee commended the Home Economics Department for its excellent laboratories and 
equipment, and the quality and quantity of textbooks. They recommended double periods for food classes 
and establishing homogeneous grouping. The Committee commended the Industrial Arts Department for 
the variety and scope of shop experiences offered in the program, a well kept shop area, and the excellent 
condition of its equipment. They recommended a review of the course of study, on each grade level, con- 
tinuity of one course after Grade 10 for specialization. 

The Committee commended the Mathematics Department for the direction and assistance given 
the new teachers, the realistic outlook of the faculty in the planning of future courses, the effectiveness ol 
the Math Club. They recommended a program for the mathematically talented student, the establishmer 
of minimum standards, and a review of the text books. The Committee commended the Science Departme 
for its extensive extra-curricular offerings, the efficient use of equipment, and the introduction of 
Biology II. They recommended purchase of additional equipment, establishment of minimum standards, 
addition of Advanced Science courses for interested students, and increased time in Grades 7 and 8 classe 



78 



The Committee commended the Social Studies Department for the excellence of classroom equip- 
ment, the extensive and knowledgeable use of social studies aides, and the excellent work done in Grades 7 
and 8. They recommended Modern European History be incorporated in Grade 12, more attention be paid 
to the Asian phase of World History, and all students be required to take one year of Problems of Democracy. 

In all phases of the Subject Fields, the Committee recommended that more time be given Depart- 
ment Heads for supervision, especially in view of the large number of new teachers. 

The Pupil Activity Program was rated 3. 4: 

The Committee commended the staff participation in available activities, the general organization 
of activities, the spirit of loyalty of student participants, and the excellent band. They recommended re- 
evaluation of the school newspaper, placing Glee Club and Orchestra as voluntary activities, increased 
speech and dramatic activities, and an increased number of sports with carry-over value. 

Library Services were rated 3. 4: 

The Committee commended the collection of books, the reference section, and the provision for 
basic space essential for a good library program. They recommended additional shelving space in the 
storeroom for periodical collection, and that additional funds be provided for periodicals, supplies, re- 
binding, and a pamphlet collection. 

Guidance Services were rated 3. 5: 



The Committee commended the communication, organization, and functioning between the school 
committee, superintendent, principal, and faculty. They recommended providing more administrative 
nfljiassistance to the principal and providing additional clerical help for the principal's office and guidance 
ml department. 

Wilmington High School is rated a good school, bordering on very good. The strengths and weak- 
is)|ne8ses have been pointed out in a fair and impartial manner. A report of progress will be required in 
1962 and another in 1965. The next evaluation will be in 1970. Meanwhile it behooves us to continue the 
progress that has been made and move the rating up to "Excellent. " 

79 



The Committee commended the extensive information services provided for the pupils, and the i 

efforts made by the staff to make guidance services meaningful and attractive to the students. They re- - i 

commended at least three full time counsellors for the present enrollment and with an increased staff, !- 0^ 

provision be made for: ' t 5 

t (1)2, 

a. More individual attention to all pupils, especially Grades 7, 8, and 9. | 

'0 5 

b. Expanded lollow-up studies of graduates and school leavers. 

C 

c. Increased placement activities by the Gmdance Department. 'f 

d. More detailed summaries of counseling sessions. ^ 
The School Plant was rated 4. 5 : 

The Committee commended the central location; the landscaping; grovinds and outdoor athletic 
areas; and the custodial care of the building. They recommended that the cafeteria, kitchen, auditorium, 
gviidance and other special facilities be studied to discover ways of increasing their utility, attractiveness 
and effectiveness. 

The School Staff and Administration was rated 4. 1: 



CONDITION OF FACILITIES 



The condition of the school plant can be best summarized in the resume below taken from the 
Report of School and Recreational Facilities Studies and Capital Budget prepared for the Wilmington 
Planning Board by Economic Development Associates, Inc. of Boston. 

"The facilities of the Wilmington School System in the fall of 1959 can be grouped under three 
qvialitative headings for disposition of existing structures (to which should be added under the permanent 
category: Boutwell, 12 classrooms, total 100). 



Permanent 


T emporary 


Emergency 


Use Only 




Clas s 




Class 




Class 


bchool 


room s 


School 


rooms 


School 


rooms 


Buzzell 


6 


Walker 


4 


Center 


4 


Swain 


10 


R oger s 


4 


West 


1 


Wildwood 


14 






Whitefield 


4 


High School 


46 










Olen Road 


12 










Boutwell 


12 










TOTALS 


100 


8 


9 



"To remain as permanent, the Buzzell and Swain Schools should have a comprehensive moderni- 
zation of buildings and sites. 

"The Walker and Rogers Schools require immediate reconstruction of playground facilities and 
continued -good maintenance. 

"The Center, West, and Whitefield Schools should be discontinued as soon as feasible with no 
major improvement expenditures to be made to the structures except for safety reasons. 

"It is understood that all buildings will be continued in use at the present time due to population 
and enrollment pressures. As the construction of new buildings takes place, in accordance with the schoo 
plan, the older, obsolete structures can be abandoned and the pupils transferred without disrupting the 
educational program. " 

Sincere appreciation is expressed to all who in any way helped in the success of the school progre 
during the past year. Without this cooperation much would go undone. 



80 



ACTUAL & PROJECTED ENROLLMENTS 

BIRTHS 



SCHOOL 
YEAR 


6 Yrs. 

EARLIER 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


TOTAL 
1-6 


7 


8 


TOTAL 
7-8 9 


10 


11 


12 


TOTAL 
9-12 


UN. 
CP . 


TOTAL 
1-12 


1959 


207 


352 


313 


314 


270 


295 


266 


1815 


275 


247 


522 


207 


182 


165 


142 


696 


48 


30S1 


1960 


230 


423 


3 32 


319 


313 


270 


301 


1958 


271 


286 


557 


251 


175 


159 


157 


742 


44 


3301 


1961 


302 


444 


396 


33C 


325 


303 


274 


2 080 


307 


273 


580 


292 


221 


154 


150 


817 


52 


3529 


1962 


325 


450 


419 


378 


344 


315 


310 


2216 


278 


309 


587 


279 


259 


197 


145 


880 


60 


3743 


1963 


341 


471 


422 


415 


335 


341 


346 


2380 


312 


280 


592 


315 


246 


229 


1G7 


977 


70 


4019 


1964 


337 


445 


446 


425 


422 


375 


383 


2496 


342 


314 




9 S3 A 


271 


219 


216 


992 


75 


4219 


1965 


"3 "7 "7 
3 1/ 


^ / u 






ATI 








"3 Q Q 




732 


32 


z Dy 


9 /. 1 


z u/ 


1 no 1 
iUz / 


ij U 


/. /, n/, 


1966 


375 




443 


416 


458 


421 


419 




375 


390 


765 


351 


284 


229 


228 


1092 






1967 








450 


42 3 


450 


42 6 




42 3 


377 


800 


397 


309 


25] 


217 


1174 






1968 










457 


413 


456 




432 


42 6 


858 


384 


352 


273 


236 


1245 






1969 












447 


421 




462 


435 


897 


433 


339 


310 


258 


1340 






1970 














452 




426 


465 


891 


442 


373 


300 


293 


1408 






1971 


















448 


429 


877 


472 


380 


331 


283 


1466 






1972 




















451 




436 


412 


335 


313 


1496 















MBffiERSHIP BY 


AGE 


AHD GRADE - OCTOBER 


1. I960 




















AGE - GRADE DISTRIBUTION 












Ages: 5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 11+ 


15 16 


17 


18 


19 




Grades 


























Totals 


1 76 


309 


36 


2 




















1+23 


2 


39 


239 


U7 


7 


















332 


3 




53 


211; 


1+2 


10 
















319 


h 






52 


200 


1+8 


13 














313 


5 








l;9 


171 


39 


9 


2 










270 


6 










1+9 


193 


1+8 


11 










301 


7 












1+7 


160 


1+7 15 


2 








271 


8 














50 


178 1+7 


10 1 








286 


9 
















55 11+6 


37 11 


2 






251 


10 
















39 


101 25 


9 


1 




175 


11 


















37 93 


25 


3 


1 


159 


12 


















36 


107 


12 


2 


157 


Ungraded 








1 


1 


8 


7 


10 10 


6 1 








1+!+ 


P.G. 






















1 


1 


2 


76 


3l*-8 


328 


315 


299 


279 


300 


271+ 


303 257 


193 167 


11+3 


17 


1+ 


3303 



81 



school maintenance department 



Boutwell School: 

All identification signs manufactured, sealed and 

installed 
Mail box painted and installed 

First aid cabinets built; soap and towel holders 
installed 

Boiler room and one janitor's closet floor treated wit? 

two coats of sealer 
One new table for kitchen built and refinished 
Three silver racks built 
Assembled twelve reading tables 

Buzzell School: 

Repaired and painted ceiling in hallway 
Repaired window frame in Mrs. Donahue's room 
Installed electric outlets in five rooms 
Installed automatic shut-off faucets in boys' and girls' 
toilets 

Chain assembly and fusible .-fuse installed in boiler 
room 

Center School: 

Repaired and touched up ceiling in front hall 
Built pin-up board and book shelves for Room 3 
Patched and painted ceiling and walls in rear hall 
Touched up paint where necessary 
Built bicycle rack 

Installed faucet under sink in boys' toilet 
Painted chalk boards green, second floor 
Replaced conductor pipe 
Painted toilet floors gray 
Built two new street signs 

Glen Road School: 

Built and installed bookcase for reading room 

Installed door-check arms on outside door 

Built and installed fence, front door 

Front door rubber bumpers installed 

Locks installed on toilet doors next to boiler room 

Repaired and gilded two metal bases for flags 

Book storage, chair storage, and one custodian's 

locker room floor treated and painted 
One key board made and stained with two coats of 

varnish 



Glen Road School (continued): 

Work bench built and stained with three coats of 
varnish 

One section of wood fence built and painted with 

two coats of paint 
Stained and varnished cabinets 
One coat of oil on ZO ft. ladder 
Four book cases built and refinished 
One table built and refinished 

Four pin-up boards built, refinished and hung 
Mail box painted and installed 
Three silver racks built for kitchen 

High School: 

Washed and oiled all unit ventilator filters 
Serviced boilers and burners 

Painted all stairway railings, lower part of dividing 
doors in gymnasium, all bulletin boards in 
wing 1-2. duct work in boys' and girls' locker 
room, auditorium foyer, and cafeteria and 
gymnasium corridor cinder blocks 
Vent shields in toilets, wings 1 and 2 
Frame in glass block window in stairway near 

Roman House 
Cleaned and repaired Venetian blinds 
Replaced ceiling blocks in Rooms 210, 206 
Replaced tiles in Home Economic Room and 
Cafeteria 

12x12 wire glass back door under gymnasium 
Cement bench repaired in boys' locker room 
Replaced ceiling in main hallway with acoustic 
blocks 

Anchored all seats in Auditorium 
Refinished forty desks in Wings 1 and 2 
Refinished one hundred tables, Wings 1 and 2 
Rechecked fire walls in all boilers 
Balanced Johnson controls throughout building 
Painted outside of Guidance office 
Touched up walls in Auditorium 
All exterior doors and most hand rails painted 
Built one desk and refinished 24 booths for 

Language Lab. 
Stripped and refinished counter in Room 210 
All cabinets washed, and all table tops polished 

and refinished in Room 209 
Kitchen floor done over 



82 



High School (continued): 



Walker School: 



The following rooms were done over including 

ceilings, washing all windows inside, dry cleaning 
all Venetian blinds; 101, 103, 104 and passageway, 
102 and stage, 206, 205, 203. 201, 202, 209, 207, 
207A, 210 and 209. (Ceilings were not done in 
Rooms 109 and 205. 

Men teacher's room and toilet completed 

Teachers' dining room completed 

Cafeteria completed, including ceiling 

Maintenance Shop: 

Toilet completed and painted, including floor 
Cabinets and interior of back door painted 

Mildred H. Rogers School: 

Installed modern lighting fixtures in two rooms 
Installed new school sign and cut out new letters 
Built cabinet doors with pin-up boards 
Touched up paint where it was necessary 

Roman House: 

Overhaul heating system: - new pipe shutoffs, valves 

and paint; new valves on all radiators 
i Observation tower removed and trap door installed 
All roof eaves pigeon proofed 
First floor radiators painted 
Three electric outlets installed 
Supervisor's room painted complete 
Removed panels and set glass in front door 

Swain School: 

Replaced window cords where needed 
Painted gymnasium floor gray 
Painted Room 103 

Room 205 completed except ceiling 

Built five book shelves, 42", in supervisor's room 

Touched up walls and woodwork where necessary, 

Rooms 201, 203 
Scraped and painted two walls in stairway, North side 
Built bicycle racks 
Replaced blackboard in Room 205 

Flooring in 5 rooms removed and replaced with ply- 
score and asphalt tile 
.Finished work recommended by Mr. Paul Fredette, 
I State Inspector, not completed in 1959 

Seven book cases manufactured and finished 

New light socket in teacher s' lounge 



Lunch room completed and painted 
Lower walls in classrooms touched up 
Put on storm windows - took off storm windows 
Installed drain for boiler 
Repaired water cooler 
Repaired hooks in coat room 
Checked window cords 
Repaired and painted cement floor 
Plywood on back cellar window where the water 
comes in 

Flag pole painted and rope installed 
Built new back steps 

West School: 

Repaired front fence 

Made and installed window screens for all windows 
Closed up school 

Drained all plumbing and winterized 
Whitefield School: 

Patched and touched up ceiling in hall, lower floor 
Installed movable desks and chairs in Grade 2 
Cafeteria floor painted gray 
Replaced sinks in boys' toilet 
Installed new window shades in Grade 3 
Refinished floor in Grade 2 

Wildwood School: 

Outside doors and trim repaired and painted 
Natural wood doors on interior of building were 
sealed 

Aluminum awnings installed on all-purpose room 

exit doors 
Air vents in roof installed 
Touched up corridor ceiling 
Painted boiler fronts with asphaltom 
Built and painted two 3x5 utility tables 
Built and sealed two portable coat racks 
Painted inserts in walls of all-purpose room 
Sealed woodwork at main entrance 
All furniture done over in teachers' lounge 
Cleaned drains on roof 
Tarred one-half of the roof 
Repaired fence 
Made screens for vents 



83 



Miscellaneous: 



Miscellaneous: 



All school warning signs painted 
Twelve TV roll-out tables built and refinished 
A general painting, patching and touch-up in all 
schools 

Window glass installed in all schools where necessary 
Cleaned and overhauled boilers on hot water systems 
All pin-up boards in all classrooms repainted 
All chalk boards cleaned and treated 
All wooden platforms and steps treated with a 
protective coat of preservative 



All windows washed 

All septic tanks checked and cleaned out when 
necessary 

All storage rooms inspected and cleaned 
All schools inspected for sand and rock salt 
All schools inspected for fire protection 
All fire extinguishers checked and refilled 
Snow stakes made, painted, and installed at all 
schools 

Built and installed six first aid cabinets 




Maintenance Supt. Anton Thiel 
at work in the shop 



84 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - March 5, I960 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: A. John Imbimbo, Constable of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By- 
laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in 
Town affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Cafeteria, Saturday, the 5th Day of March, A. D.1960 
at 9- 45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10. 00 a. m. and shall be closed at 8. 00 p. m. for 
the election of the Town Offices: 

Article 1: To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named Offices, to wit: Two 
Selectmen for the term of three years; Two members of the School Committee for the term of three years; 
One member of the School Committee for the term of one year (to fill an unexpired term); One member of 
the School Committee for the term of two years (to fill an unexpired term); One Moderator for the term of 
one year; One member of the Wilmington Housing Authority for the term of five years. 

|You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 

Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and meet 

in Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington on Saturday, the 

12th Day of March, A. D. I960 at 1. 30 p. m. , then and there to act on the remainder of the articles in said ^ 

Warrant. |g 

L 

a 

In accordance with the above, the meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 9. 45 a. m. The Warrant J 
IS above was read by the Moderator and on a motion by Mr. Joseph Ring it was voted to dispense with fur- - i 

her reading of said Warrant. '^5 

The ballot box was examined by the Moderator, Town Clerk and Police. It was found to be empty and to (I) 3 

•egister 00000. The checkers were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties and the ballots dis- ? 

ributed. 'c f 

'0 = 

The polls were declared open at 10. 00 a. m. The polls were declared closed at 8. 00 p. m. Following ^ 

s the vote as declared by the Moderator:- pig 

Selectmen - 3 years ^ 



Sleeted Charles H. Black, One Thousand Three Hundred Sixty-five 1365 

elected Donald C. PCidder, One Thousand Three Hundred 1300 

James P. Donahue, Four Hundred Fifty- seven 457 

Rene J. LaRivee, Six Hundred Seventy-one 671 

Blanks, Two Hundred Sixty-one 261 



4054 



)chool Committee - 1 year Unexpired Term 



M. Flora Kasabuski, Eight Hundred Sixty-three 863 
elected George G. Robertie, One Thousand Thirty 1030 
Blanks, One Hundred Thirty-three 133 

All others, One 1_ 

2027 

chool Committee - 2 years Unexpired Term 



::iected Robert F. Hastings, One Thousand Sixty-four 1064 
William K. Widger, Jr. , Eight Hundred Seventy-four 874 
Blanks, Eighty-nine 89 



2027 



85 



School Committee - 3 years 

Elected Ernest M. Crispo, One Thousand Five Hundred Twenty-eight 1528 
Elected John F. Hartnett, One Thousand Five Hundred Seventy-three 1573 
Blanks, Nine Hundred Forty-eight 948 
All others, Five 5 

4054 

Moderator - 1 year 

Elected Simon Cutter, One Thousand Seven Hundred Seventeen 1717 
Blanks, Three H\indred Seven 307 
All others. Three 3 

2027 

Wilmington Housing Authority - 5 years 

Elected Ernest B. Rice, Nine Hundred Forty-two 942 
John C. Holloway, Four Hundred Forty- six 446 
Charles M. Kelley, Four Hundred Eighty-two 482 
Blanks, One Hundred Fifty- six 156 
All others. One 1 

2027 

The Ballot Box read, Two Thousand Twenty-Six. One ballot caught in machine, when it was released the 
machine did not register it. Actual count of ballots was Two Thousand Twenty- seven. 

Mr. Simon Cutter, Moderator, read the total vote at 8. 45 p.m. All elected officials present were then 
sworn to the faithful performance of their duties. 

A true copy: (Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 

Attest: Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - March 12, I960 - High School Gymnasium 



The Annual Meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. Simon Cutter, at 1. 45 p. m. 
Reverend Robert E. Sanders led the meeting in prayer. 

Article 2. To hear the reports of Commitees and act thereon. 

Mr. Fred Corum read a report from the High School Addition Committee. 

Mr. Paul Niles reported briefly on the Permanent Building Committee's activities to date. 
No other reports were offered at this time. 

In order to save time, Mr. Cutter suggested that the Warrant need not be read any further at this time. 
Each article will be read prior to town meeting action. There being no objection, this procedure was 
followed. 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectm' 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year, beginning January 1' 

1960 and to issue notes therefor payable within one year, all in accordance with Sections 4 and 17, Chapter' 
of the General Laws. Mr. Donald C. Kidder moved the adoption of the above article. Voted unanimously. 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectm*' 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year, beginning' January 1 

1961 and to issue notes therefor payable within one year, all in accordance with Sections 4 and 17, Chapter 
of the General Laws. Mr. Nicholas L. DeFelice moved the adoption of the above article. Voted unanimoui 



86 



Article 5. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and salaries of 
the several Town Offices, and Departments, and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxa- 
tion, transfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. On a motion by 
Mr. Wm. Curtin it was voted that the several and respective sums as recommended by the Finance 
Committee be raised and appropriated for the purposes set forth in Article #5, each item to be taken up and 
voted on separately, subject to amendment. Accordingly the following amounts were voted: - 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 



Taxation 



Board of Selectmen 


2, 900. 


00 


Elections 


1, 800. 


00 


Registrars of Voters 


2,700. 


00 


Finance Committee 


900. 


00 


Town Manager 


14, 400. 


00 


Industrial Account 


1, 200. 


00 


Town Accountant 


6, 900. 


00 


Town Treasurer 


6, 000. 


00 


Town Collector 


6, 300. 


00 


Town Clerk 


4, 500. 


00 


Board of Assessors 


12, 700. 


00 


Town Counsel 


3, 500. 


00 


Town Hall 


16, 500. 


00 


Planning Board 


2, 000. 


00 



TOTAL: General Government 

PROTECTION - PERSONS & PROPERTY: 
Police Dept. Salaries 
Police Dept. Expenses 
Police Station 
Fire Dept. Salaries, 
Fire Dept. Expenses 
Ambulance Account 
Fire/Police Station 
Civil Defense 
Constable 
Dog Officer 
Building Inspector 
Board of Appeals 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Tree Warden 
Gypsy Moth Control 
Dutch Elm Control 

TOTAL: Protection - Persons & Property 



Voted, 122- Yes 113- No to AMEND to 
Voted to AMEND to 



$82, 300. 


00 


90, 000. 


00 


7, 370. 


00 


1, 530. 


00 


83, 270. 


00 


11, 041. 


00 


1, 760. 


00 


4, 250. 


00 


500. 


00 


100. 


00 


2, 000. 


00 


8, 900. 


00 


240. 


00 


915. 


00 


8, 900. 


00 


5, 300. 


00 


8, 600. 


00 


234, 676. 


00 



L 

a 
k. 

a 

(5 1 

\] 

5 SI 

' z 

z\ 

'0 = 

c 

i 



PUBLIC WORKS: 

Town Engineer 12, 400. 00 

Highway Dept. Salaries 43,213.00 

Highway Dept. Expenses 33,000.00 

Road Machinery Account 15,150.00 

Chapter 90 Construction 6, 000. 00 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 1, 500. 00 

Chapter 81 Maintenance 11,000.00 

Snow & Ice Control 26, 000. 00 

Public Street Lights 16, 000. 00 

Parks 4,900.00 

Cemeteries 20, 000. 00 

TOTAL: Public Works 189,163.00 



87 



HEALTH &r SANITATION- 


Taval"! r\T\ 

X d.A.dl,lUll 


Rnarr) nf Health 


20 "575 00 

Lj\J y ^ \ J . \J\J 


Oarhaap Cnllprtinn AMENDED to rpad 


Q noo 00 

7 I \J\J\J . \J\J 


Public Dump (AMENDMENT to reduce to $8, 000. 00 LOST) 


15, 500. 00 


TOTAL: Health & Sanitation 


44, 875. 00 


Vw* 11 Zi.r\ i J. IXLj O Oi V x_i ± i-j x\ JT. J. N O J_) X-J 1 N X-J i X o . 




.^^UI I IX 111 O L X cLLlUll} X^LlL^XxL, VV Clldl C 


7 1 R on 


O X £3 LCL 11 ^ \^ 1 X VJ. l-/XX\v *( V^XX CL X ^ 


90 000 00 


\f t^i" ^ T*anc AifH anH R ^> n ^ t t i" c 

V CtCX dllS .r^A Kl CL 1 lU J— ' CllC^llLo 


20 220 00 

tdW, L^\J , \J\J 


T OT AT • PVi^^fiti^^G Rr Vf»t(=» >- anc Rf»nf>fitQ 

X X XI. -1— ' . llcL xlLlCo Ot VCtCxClllS i-> CllClltS 


117 7 "^R nn 


O 1 1 V-V V_y X-/ kj> . 




Tl 1* J 1 I (~> t" 1* ("1 1 
VJCllCX cLi v-fUllLX \J 1. 




OCLXCLX XC^O 


70 740 nn 


XNUll~iJa.Xctiy Xtt^lIlS 


n7n nn 


XLj LJC 11 o t:^ \J L XlloUX LXV_tX*w'll 




iZ/dXclxxtr o 




XN (Jll~OcLXciiy XLcIIls 




lie dl L 11 


1 


LjdXdX IC; o 


7 , 1 J J . ^ 


iN(Jli~iJdXdxy XLClXlo 


1 1 "^n nn 

1 , 1 -» V/ . WW 


<j L XXX t X c a 


14 700 no 

XT, % \J\J . \J\J 


X xdilolJLJxLdLXUll x^XVl X_< X N J_V Hi Xv LtJ X C d U 


74. on 

\J L, L, . \J\J 


Auxiliary Agencies 




Salarie s 


3, 500. 00 


IN ^Jl I Od Xd 1 y XLCilla 


iA 47 nn 


1^ 3 f" 3 1 III 1 1" 1 3 
V_/d LIX LdX w IXLXd y 


^ 7n4 nn 


o u JD - 1 kJ 1 /\ J— ' . ocnooi -L-'c pa r Lrric nt 


R 1 "=> 7 74 nn 


Operation of School Plant 


148, 700. 00 


Vocational Training 


4, 000. 00 


1 \j 1 -ta.x-' . oc nooi s 




T TRPARV kr R FOR F ATTOM- 
j_jlIDr\/\rv 1 <x x\ i_< Vw- xx 1-1 /\ 1 i\_/lN. 




Public Library 


17 400 no 


R e c r e ati on C ommi s sion 


L. cno 00 

D , D\J\J . \J\J 


i kj 1 -TxX-j . j-JiDrary oc rvecrcciLiori 


1 ft Qon nn 


UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE: 




Reserve Fund 


20, 000. 00 


Insurance & Bonds 


/ a / K R no 
c-D , COD . Kjyj 


' 1 >™ O 1 T f /^T^ T ^ £i V, ^ Xr 111 T 1" r\ T ^ ^ 1 T» O X r Q 1 

J. xcillllXl^ v-* wl 11 C 1 C C CjC LlL L/l ~ kj Ld L C ± iexVCl 


1 700 00 


Tax Title & Legal Assistance 


c^oo on 

DKJKJ . \J\J : 


Town Clock 


100. 00 : 


Town Report 


3, 000. 00 


TOTAL: Unclassified & Reserve 


50,065.00 


MATURING DEBT & INTEREST: 




Principal 


269, 000. 00 


Interest & Fees 


98, 847. 50 


TOTAL: Maturing Debt & Interest 


367, 847. 50 


GRAND TOTAL: 


$2, 072, 988. 50 



88 



Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sunn of One Thousand Dollars ($1,000) 
for the observance of Memorial Day and that the Moderator appoint a Committee who shall arrange and have 
charge of such observance, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved $750. 00. 
Mrs. Drew moved the adoption of the above article. Voted, unanimously. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750. 00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suit- 
able headquarters for the Wilmington Post #136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Finance Committee approved. Mr. Black moved the adoption of the above article. Voted, unanimously. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750. 00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse, on Main Street for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Nee -Ellsworth Post #2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States 
or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved. Mr. Hagerty moved the adoption of the 
above article. Voted unanimously. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money under the authority of 
Section 9, of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, as amended, for the purpose of providing suitable quarters 
for the William F. Tattersall Chapter #106, Disabled American Veterans, located in Wilmington, Mass. , or 
do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved $750. 00. Mr. Kidder moved the adoption of 
the above article. Voted unanimously. 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred Dollars ($100. 00) 



the money to be expended under the direction of the 4-H Town Committee, serving in co-operation with the 
Middlesex County Extension Service, under provisions of Sections 40 to 45, Chapter 128, General Laws of 
Massachusetts, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved. Mr. DeFelice moved 
the adoption of the above article. Voted unanimously. 

Article 11. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate for the purchase of two vehicles for the use of the Police Department and authorize 
the sale or turn-in of the two present vehicles used by the Police Department, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved $3, 000. 00. On a motion by 
Mrs. Drew it was voted to raise by transfer from available funds the sum of $3, 000. 00 and appropriate for 
the above purpose. 

[ Article 12. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
|funds, and appropriate for the purchase of a truck for the use of the Highway Department and authorize the 
sale or turn-in of a truck presently used by the Highway Department, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved $4, 000. 00. On a motion by Mr. Black it was 
/oted to raise by transfer from available funds the sum of $4, 000. 00 and appropriate for the above purpose. 

^.rticle 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds a sum of 



noney not to exceed Three Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($3, 500. 00) and appropriate the sum for the pur- 
chase of a truck for the School Maintenance Department, or take any action in relation thereto. Request of 
Trancis E. Downs, Superintendent of Wild-v^ood Cemetery. Finance Committee approved $3, 500. 00. On a 
notion by Mr. Francis J. Hagerty it was voted to raise by transfer from available funds the sum of $3, 500 
md appropriate for the above purpose. 

M i 

5j ^rticle 14. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
51 junds and appropriate for the purchase of a truck for the use of the Fire Department and authorize the sale 
>T turn-in of a truck presently used by the Fire Department or to do anything in relation thereto. Request 
■f the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved $2, 500. 00. On a motion by Mr. Kidder it was voted 
raise by transfer from available funds the sum of $2, 500. 00 and appropriate for the above purpose. 



89 



Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of laying , 
water mains of not less than 6 inches, but less than 16 inches in diameter on specified streets in accordance 
with the recommendations of the Board of Water Commissioners acting under the provisions of Chapter 33Z, 
of the Acts of 1955, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board 
of Water Commissioners. Finance Committee approved the unexpended balance of 1957 Water Extension 
appropriation. 

Motion by Mr. Waldo Stevens: I move that the Town vote to appropriate and raise by transfer $7,222. 56 as 
follows: $7, 175. 29 from the 1957 Water Betterment Account, $38. 11 from the 1958 Water Betterment Acct. , 
$8. 35 from the West Street Extension Account, and $.81 from the Standpipe Construction Account, for the 
purpose of laying water mains of not less than six inches, but less than sixteen inches in diameter under the 
provisions of Chapter 332 of the Acts of 1955 for certain distances on the following streets: Lowell St. , Fair 
field Rd. and/or in such other streets as may be decided by the Bd. of Water Comm. Voted unanimously. 

Article 16. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate for the purchase of a vehicle for the use of the Welfare Department and authorize the 
sale or turn-in of the present vehicle used by the Welfare Department, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved $1, 500. 00. Mr. Andrew Ring moved the j 
adoption of the above article, and it was voted to raise by transfer from available funds the sum of $1, 500. 00 
and appropriate for the above purpose. 

Article 17. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purchase of a sidewalk snowplow for the use of the Highway Department, or do 
anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved $5, 400. 00. On a 
motion by Mr. DeFelice it was voted to raise by transfer from available funds the sum of $5, 400. 00 and 
appropriate for the purpose. 

Article 18. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available func , 
and appropriate for the purchase of a sidewalk roller for the use of the Highway Department, or do anything 
in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved $1, 700. 00. On a motion 
by Mrs. Drew it was voted to raise by transfer from available funds the sum of $ 1 , 700. 00 and appropriate 
for the above purpose. 

Article 19- To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate for the purchase of new street signs for the Planning Board, or do anything in relatio 
thereto. Request of the Planning Board. Finance Committee approved $2, 000. 00. On a motion by 
Mr. Fitzmaurice and amended by Mr. Lancaster it was voted to raise by transfer from available funds the 
sum of $2, 000. 00 and appropriate for the above purpose. 

Article 20. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate for the purchase of a new sprayer for the use of the Tree Department, or do anything 
in relation thereto. Request of the Tree Warden. Finance Committee approved $7, 330.00. On a motion b^ 
Mr. Black it was voted to raise by transfer from available funds the sum of $7, 330. 00 and appropriate for 
the above purpose. 

Article 21. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate for the purpose of installing a drainage system on Hobson Avenue, or do anything in 
relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee approved $8, 000. 00. On a 
motion by Mr. Francis J. Hagerty it was voted to raise by transfer from available funds the sum of 
$8, 000. 00 and appropriate for the above purpose. 

Article 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds, and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved $2,000. 00. On a motion by 
Mr. Donald C. Kidder it was voted to raise by transfer from available funds the sum of $1,971. 30 and appro 
priate for the above purpose. 

90 




Article 23. 



priate a sum of money for the purpose of installing . tr Jf V ^^^"s^^r trom available funds, and appro- 
Avenue. Marion Street and Deming Way or do an^hil. T"""' -tersection of Burlington 

Housing Authority. Finance Committer'ap^roved $3 000^^0^ ^a "^T" K^'tr Wilmington 
ra.se hy transfer from avaUahle funds the^^um of l] Z. ^ ^ 

^i^ani: :;:-^ii:r::^cr:s:°m::::^::.s:.::rr^^^ ^""-^ — ^ 

30se to appropriate a sum of money to be raTseTby taxatrn b -^^J-^diate school, and for sa.d pur- 

.r otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto Reouest tb'' T °" """^'"^'^ — ■ 

:ommittee approved $7. 500 00. On a mot on bv Mr pf I N' i ^"'''^"^ Committee. Finance 

mailable funds the sum of $7. 500. 00 and aCopHate'^for rhrab:tr pur^:;:""^ " ''''' 



"^rt~.Jri::: r:!;:'"'j^!:~ 'y}~ - -^nsfer from available fund 



lot to exc-eed Three Thousand Five Hundred D^nar"; (sTsio" Om and"'" ^--1-^1- ^-nds a sum of money 

.venues in Wildwood Cemetery as far as th. Z n ^ appropriate the sum for hot topping 

lequest of the Cemetery Commis ilners FirnceV T"^'' °' ^""^ ^^^^^-^ ^^-'^o.' 

.f cemetery lots. On a motion by mT DeFrreTwarv^t^^^^^ T'^T' I'' '^^^ " ^^""^^^ °f 
. cemetery .ots Account and a/propr.ate tle^ame^:: TstilUTn a We^rt'l!.^ ' " 

'^^of Pubii: wiifir?";;:: tr ^^fv'r' ^^^-^ 

;hairman of the Board of Park L^i^ ilersf t^^^^^^^^^ Recreation Commission (if any. otherwise the 
chools. or their respective represe'tat' es and lot f ^"^r" I °' Superintendent of 

ppointed by the Town Manager frorthe ^oterranrres d' 'f^-.^'^f^V^' ^^^^'^ additional members 

hall be designated from time to tiW bv The T ^"'^/"^^^^"^^ °' Town. The Chairman of the Council 
re designate'd. The Cou"a; appo'L 3 J^^^^^^ -til successors 

le duty of the council to co-ordinate or ca-v o ^ employees as it may require. It shall be 

.dination with programs of the ColcTl f tU^g^^g^eTblisi:^^^^^^^^^^ "^'r '1^''^ ^'^^ ^ 

Massachusetts General Laws, or do anything in VS^t ^"'f ^^"^^^ ^"^^^ ^^^tion 73. of Chapter 6 of the 
UionbyMrs. Drew it was ;o:ed to pas^^^^^^^^^ Request of the Board of Selectmen. On a 

'iticle^. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1Q5« . .v, ■ • u 
ilmington to construct and operate a svst^rr. of 00 ~, ^ authorizing the Town of 

oard of Selectmen Finance Com' in! 7''^ °" ° anything in relation thereto. Request of the 

iat there is a need for a redeveloDment a.loliT ' "''""''y ""e To^n voted to determine 

<«ion Z6 QQ. or do ..n^^^XlZ" 'J 'iZ^ro" Z B^^To'l"^ T ^ '"7."'^ ' 

finance Committee recommends ratification of s ««q«Mst ol the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. 

jr. Charles Black it was "ted to pals the article °" » "v 

i^a„:f°or.;:VpturT"o:"Meti:: ::;";:ti::tr,;^: ^r- r:: 

ir.T, ctpLr it! ^sTc-iL^zTxi'" 4 --f . 

id Town Manager Financ" Commm """^ / '''I""' ">« ^oard of Selectmen 

(/29/56. Committee recommends ratification of Special Town Meeting action held 

;."r.irh,rTow^n ^^tt";t!:;r« ^"th ' r '"^ - "'"^ 

'Ureby the Town voted trdeterm ^e 'ha there' "J ^"'"'^ "^^ O"""" 

-Programs, as authori.ed'^ ^Tn,'"" ,'0^^, mlTc.tnrxJ^ " 

91 




Article 29 (continued) : |i 
Action on nnotion as follows: 11 
Mr. Elfman moved to amend by inserting the word 'recind' in place of 'ratify'. This motion was withdrawn., 
Mr. Smith moved to lay the motion on the table. Standing vote taken. Yes - 90 No 187. This motion wast 
lost. The 'Previous Question' was called for and then withdrawn. Mr. Courtney moved to postpone in- [ 
definitely. Motion withdrawn. Mr. Coolidge moved to refer to a committee to be appointed by the Town : 
Manager and Moderator and report at a later meeting. LOST. The vote on the Main motion as read by 
Mr. Kidder was as follows: STANDING VOTE. YES 144 NO 111. Motion carried, not to ratify. 

Recessed here - 5. 30 p. m. Reconvened at 7. 30 p. m. on Mr. Black's motion. 

Article 30. To see if the Town will vote to ratify and confirm the action taken by the Town under Article 
of the warrant for the Special Town Meeting held October 29, 1956, whereby the Town voted to appropriate c| 
sum of money for the purpose of acquiring as a site for a school building a parcel of land containing approxij 
mately 12. 2 acres of land on the corner of Salem Street and Ballardvale Street, or do anything in relation ; 
thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. Finance Committee recommends ratifica 
tion of Special Town Meeting action held 10/29/56. On a motion by Mr. DeFelice the above article was 
voted unanimously. 

Article 31. To see if the Town will vote to ratify and confirm the action taken by the Town under Article #> 
of the warrant for the Special Town Meeting held October 29, 1956, whereby the Town voted to appropriate a| 
sum of money for the purchase of a dump truck equipped with a snow plow and spreader body, or do anything 
in relation thereto. Request of Selectmen and Town Manager. Finance Committee recommends ratificatioi 
of Special Town Meeting action held 10/29/56. On a motion by Mrs. Drew the above article was voted un- | 
animously. 

Article 32. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 4 of Article 4 of the Town By-laws by striking oul 
the same and substituting in place thereof the following: SECTION 4. The Committee shall seven days priCj 
to any town meeting at which Articles contained in the Warrant are to be acted upon, prepare, publish and 
distribute by leaving copies thereof in the office of the Town Clerk, their report and recommendations on ; 
such Articles. For each annual town meeting for the transaction of business, such reports and recommenda 
tions shall show in detail the anticipated income and expenditures of the Town for the then current year and 
copies thereof shall at least seven days prior to such meeting be mailed to the registered voters of the Town 
or made available to such registered voters as may desire to obtain the same in such other manner as the 
committee may in its discretion determine, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manage^ 
Finance Committee approved. On a motion by Mr. Charles H. Black the above article was so voted. i 
YES 150 NO 32. 

Article 33. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager to appoint a: 
Historical Committee, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance i 
Committee approved. On a motion by Mr. Hagerty the above article was voted unanimously. : 

Article 34. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Pineridge Road as approved 
by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the assessment of ■ 
Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned j 
is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by the. 
right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect 
the purpose of this article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said way and for;| 
the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements ther«;ft 
for, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee approved | 
$13, 000. 00. On a motion by Mr. Kidder it was voted to appropriate the sum of $13, 000. 00 as follows: i 
That the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow the sum of $13, 000. 00 j 
and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor payable within five years as stated in the above article, for'; 
which this money is raised. 

92 



I 



Article 35. To see if the Town will vote to accept and construct Carolyn Road as a public town way as laid 
out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to a plan filed with the office of 
the Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by the Right of Eminent Domain such land, 
slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of the Article and to see 
how much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and determine how such appropriation shall be 
raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds in the treasury, or otherwise, or do anything 
in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee approved $15, 000. 00. On a 
motion by Mr. DeFelice it was voted to raise by transfer from available funds the sum of $15, 000. 00 and 
appropriate same for the above purpose. 



Article 36. To see if the Town will vote to accept and construct the relocation of a portion of Boutwell Street 
as a public town way as laid out by the Board of SeleC'-inen and approved by che Planning Board according to 
a plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by Right of 
Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage and other easements as may be necessary to effect the pur- 
pose of the Article and to see how much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and determine how 
such appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds in the treasury, 
or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee 
approved $25, 000. 00. On a motion by Mrs. Drew it was voted to raise by transfer from available funds the 
sum of $25, 000. 00 and appropriate the same for the above purpose. 



Article 37. To see if the Town will vote to accept and construct the relocation of a portion of Middlesex 
Avenue as a public town way as laid out by the Board of Selscrnen and approved by the Planning Board accord- 
ing to a plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by Right 
of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage and other easements as may be necessary to effect the pur- 
pose of the Article and to see how much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and determine how 
such appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds in the treasury, or 
otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee 
approved $10, 000. 00. On a motion by Mr. Black it was voted to pass the article. 

Article 38. To see if the Town will vote to accept and construct the relocation of a portion of Glen Road as 
a public town way as laid ou. by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to a 
plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by Right of Eminent 
Domain such land, slope and drainage and other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of the 
Article and to see how much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and determine how such appro- 
priation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds in the treasury, or otherwise, 
or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee disapproved. 
On a motion by Mr. DeFelice it was voted to pass over the article. 



2 



c 



Article 39. To see if the Town will vote to accept Dorothy Avenue as a public town way as laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to a plan filed with the office of the Town 
Clerk, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee approved. 
On a motion by Mr. Donald C. Kidder it was voted to adopt the article as above. 

Article 40. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and the Town Manager to execute and 
deliver on behalf of the Town a deed of release running to John and Rose McSheffrey of said Wilmington to all 
rights in a certain portion of land lying on the northerly side of Boutwell Street in said Wilmington which was 
taken by the Board of Selectmen by eminent domain through inadvertence in excess of the area actually in- 
tended to be taken; the area to be released being that set forth in the following description: "Beginning at a 
'drill hole in a stone wall in the northerly corner of land belonging to John W. & Eva M. Parsons; thence N 
44° 57' 30" W 166. 66 feet to an iron pipe; thence N 39° 04' 10" E by land of Nicholas and Marion L. Solas 
^5. 03 feet; thence S 44° 57' 30" E by land of the Town of Wilmington 166. 66 feet to a stone wall; thence S 39° 
04' 10" W 5. 03 feet along said stone wall to the point of beginning. Containing 833. 30 square feet, or do any- 
thing in relation thereto. Request of the Permanent BuildiYig Committee. Finance Committee approved. 
lOn a motion by Mr. Hagerty it was voted to adopt the article as above. 



93 



ti 



Article 41 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town By-laws by inserting therein a new chapter 
numbered, entitled and reading as follows: or do anything in relation thereto. "Chapter 5a. RULES AND • 
REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE OPERATION OF MOTOR -DRIVEN BOATS IN THE TOWN OF WILMINGTCj 
SECTION 1. No person shall operate a motor-driven boat unless he shall have first registered the same I 
with the Chief of Police and obtained a certificate of registration together with a registration number for the ' 
boat which shall be displayed on both sides of the bow in numerals at least six inches high. Said numerals 
may be painted on removal boards. The Chief of Police may revoke •.he registration of any boat, the opera- ■ 
tor of which has been convicted of violating any of the rules or regulations contained in this chapter. j 
SECTION 2. No motor-driven boat shall be operated unless the motor has an underwater exhaust or is 
equipped with a muffler which complies with the standards set up by the Department of Public Safety. 
SECTION 3. No person shall operate a motor-driven boat on any lake, pond or river in the Town of Wil- \ 
mington at such a speed or in such a manner as to endanger the lives and safety of others or the property of 
others or in such a manner as to cause danger of collision with other watercraft or in such a manner as io ' 
create excessive wash or wake so as to interfere with the operation and safety of other watercraft, endanger 
bathers or damage property. 

SECTION 4. The operation of a motor -driven boat on any lake, pond or river in the Town of Wilmington 1 
under conditions and/or in places or areas as hereinafter indicated at speeds greater than as so indicated i 
shall be considered to be in violation of these rules and regulations. 

(a) When approaching or leaving the shore or a pier or when passing within one hundred feet of a bather or 

a bathing area or another boat or when passing within one hundred feet of the shore except in a location wherl 
the shore is entirely undeveloped and unimproved and where no dwellings exist, three miles per hour. 1 

(b) When passing within two hundred feet of but over one hundred feet distant from a bather or bathing area ' 
or another boat or when passing within two hundred feet of but over one hundred feet distant from the shore i 
except in a location where the shore is entirely undeveloped and unimproved and where no dwellings exist, ; 
seven miles per hour. ' 

(c) When passing within five hundred feet of but over two hundred feet distant from the shore except in a 
location where the shore is entirely undeveloped and unimproved and where no dwellings exist, ten miles per 
hour. 

(d) In any location during the hours from one-half hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise, seven 
miles per hour. 

MOTION TO AMEND - Voted to strike out Paragraph (d) of Section 4. 
MOTION TO AMEND - Voted that Section 5 be amended to read as follows: 

SECTION 5. That during the period commencing one-half hour after sunset and ending at 8. 00 a. m. the 
following day, no motor-driven boat be operated on any lake, pond, or river, in the Town of Wilmington, 
except for life saving purposes. 

SECTION 6. No person shall operate a motor-driven boat on any lake, pond or river in the Town of Wil- 
mington within fifty feet of a bather or bathing area at any time except for life saving purposes. 
SECTION 7. No person shall operate a motor -driven boat on any lake, pond or river in the Town of Wil- 
mington while under the influence of intoxicating liquor. 

SECTION 8. Row boats, canoes and sailing boats shall have the right of way at all times, 

SECTION 9. The above rules and regulations are to be enforced by authorized police officials of the Town 
of Wilmington, and the violation of the above rules and regulations shall for each offense be punished by a 
fine of not more than Twenty ($20. 00) Dollars. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee - 
no action. Motion as amended was moved by Mr. DeFelice. Voted to adopt the above article as amended, 
unanimously. 

Article 42. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law by striking out Paragraph 1 3 of 
Section III-3 A thereof and substituting therefor the following: "13. Commercial parking lot or parking 
garage, filling or service station, salesroom for new automobiles, open lot for parking or sale of new or 
used automobiles when operated in connection with, and on the same site as, such a salesroom, salesroom 
for boats, trailers, trucks, farm implements or farm machinery. " or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Planning Board. Finance Committee approve recommendation of the Planning Board. On a 
motion by Mr. Beers the above article was voted unanimously. 



94 



'Article 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law by adding a new paragraph to be 
numbered 3a following Paragraph 3 of Section III-3-b thereof reading as follows: "3a. Open lot for parking 
or sale of used automobiles not operated in connection with a salesroom for new automobiles. " or do any- 
thing in relation thereto. Request of the Planning Board. Finance Committee approve recommendation of 
the Planning Board. On a motion by Mr. Beers the above article was voted unanimously. 

(Mr. Rene LaRivee moved to reconsider Article #15. LOST. 

Article 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Industrial to 
General Business District the following described parcel of land: "Beginning at the center line intersections 
of Main Street and Bridge Lane thence 900 feet N 78° 15' 22" E; thence 550 feet S 6CP 44' 38" E; thence 
1, 394. 83 feet, S 29° 15' 22" W; thence 250 feet, S 11° 44' 38" E; thence 400 feet, 5 73° 1 5' 22 ' .V to the 
center line of Main Street; thence 1, 653. 52 feet along center line of Main Street N 1 1° 44' 38" W to the point 
,of beginning or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Planning Board. Finance Committee approved 
|the recommendation of the Planning Board. On a motion by Mr. Beers the above article was adopted un- 
animously. 

Article 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Single 
Resident A to Industrial the following parcel of land, being a part of a sab-divlsio i kaown as Ox Pasture, off 
Woburn Street in the southerly part of Wilmington: Beginning at a point in the center line of Woburn Street, 
240 feet from the extension of the southerly side of Morse Avenue; thence southerly 210 feet along Woburn 
Street; thence easterly 1300 feet along the existing zoning boundary; thence northerly 230 feet in a direction 
parallel with Woburn Street; thence westerly 1301 feet to the point of beginning, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee approved the recommendatio -i of the 
Planning Board. Mr. DeFelice moved the adoption of the above article. Motion was unanimously opposed. 

p.A.rticle 46. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law by inserting a new sub- section numbered, 

entitled and reading as follows, or do anything in relation thereto; Section III- 3 USES IN GENERAL BUSINESS 

DISTRICTS. A. In a general business district the following uses are hereby permitted: 

21. A direct consumer, and/or commercial service type dry-cleaning plant establishment. Request of 

Mary S. Pizzuti and others. Finance Committee approved the recommendation of the Planning Board. 

Mr. Roland I. Wood moved the adoption of the above article amended by Mr. Walker by adding after the word, 

non-flamable, "and non-toxic" Amendment so voted. Vote on main motion as amended Yes 203 No 4. 

Motion carried as amended. 

Article 47 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-laws and Zoning Map by changing from 
Single Resident A District to Neighborhood Business District, the following described parcel of land: 
A certain parcel of land in the easterly part of Wilmington, starting at the corner of Lowell Street and West 
jStreet; thence northerly along West Street to a point, two hundred twenty-five (225) feet south of Westdale 
jAvenue; thence westerly five hundred eighty (580) feet parallel with Westdale Avenue; thence southerly by 
jland now or formerly of Ruth and Howard Edwards to Lowell Street; thence southeasterly by Lowell Street to 
the point of beginning, or do anything else in relation thereto. Request of John J. Elia and others. Finance 
Committee approve recommendation of the Planning Board. On a motion by Mr. Beers it was voted to pass 
lOver the article. 

Article 48 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from SINGLE 
RESIDENCE A DISTRICT TO NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESS DISTRICT the following described parcel of land: 
j"The land in the Southern part of Wilmington and bounded, Northerly by Lot B on a plan hereinafter mentioned 
one hundred seventy-one and 40/100 feet; Easterly by Lot 19 seventy-five feet; Southerly by Burlington Avenue 
one hundred thirty-two feet; Westerly by Forest Street eighty- seven and 04/100 feet; said parcel being shown 
as Lot A on a plan recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry Deeds Book of Plans 63 Plan 87A, or do 
anything in relation thereto. Request of Theresa Bedell and others. Finance Committee approve recommen- 
dation of the Planning Board. On a motion by Mr. Bedell the above article was adopted unanimously. 



95 



Article 49. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 4 of Chapter 2 of the Town By-laws by striking c 
the same and substituting in place thereof the following: "Section 4. Notice of every town meeting shall be 
given by posting printed copies of the warrant for such meeting in five or more public pj.aces in the town, n 
less than seven days before the time named in the warrant for holding said meeting. ", or do anything in 
relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved. On a motion by Mrs. Dre i 
the above article was adopted unanimously. ? 

Article 50. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 11 of Chapter 2 of the Town By-laws by striking 
out the same and substituting in place thereof the following: "Section 11. Before any action is taken on an'"' 
motion carrying an expenditure or appropriation of money the Moderator shall call upon the Finance Com- 
mittee for its report and recommendation thereon, or do anything in relation thereto." Request of the Towi, 
Manager. Finance Committee approved. On a motion by Mr. Hagerty the above article was adopted unai ] 
mously. 

Article 51. To see if the Town will vote to amend Chapter 2 of the Town By-laws by adding at the end ther& 
the following new section: "Section 22. Failure to comply with any requirements contained in Section 5, 
Section 6, Section 7, Section 8, Section 10, Section 1 1 or Section 21 of this Chapter shall not invalidate any 
vote or action of the Town; or do anything in relation thereto. " Request of the Town Manager. Finance 
Committee approved. I 

Mr. Kidder moved the adoption of the above article. Action as follows: Each section taken up separately: 
Section 5 - Voted. Section 6 - Voted. Section 7 - Voted. Section 8 - Standing vote, Yes 106 No 42 
Voted. Section 10 - Voted. Section 11 - Standing vote - Yes 106 No 34, Voted. Section 21 - Voted. 

Motion in its entirety was voted by voice - LOST. Seven people rose to doubt the vote. Standing vote take; 
Yes - 107, No - 91. Main motion carried. 

Article 52. To see if the Town will vote to amend Chapter 4 of the Town By-laws by adding at the end ther 
of the following new section: "Section 5, Failure to comply with any requirement contained in either Section 
or Section 4 of this chapter shall not invalidate any vote or action of the Town; or do anything in relation i 
thereto." Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved. On a motion by Mr. DeFelice 
the above article was adopted unanimously. 

Article 53. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a certain sum of money to be used for the 
establishment of a Public Health Laboratory, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of 
Health. Finance Committee approved $1,900. 00. On a motion by Mr. Walker it was voted to raise by > 
transfer from available funds the sum of $1,900. 00 and appropriate the same to be used for the establishme 
of a Public Health Laboratory. 

Article 54. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Junior -Senior High School Building Committee wit( 
the approval of the School Committee to have prepared and made up a suitable bronze bust or bas-relief of , 
Dudley A. Buck, former School Committee Chairman as a memorial to be placed in the Junior-Senior High ; 
School. The cost to come from available funds of the unexpended balance of a bond issue previously author- 
zed by vote of the Town for constructing, equipping and furnishing the addition to the Junior -Senior High Sc; 
Building Committee and the School Committee. Finance Committee approved. On a motion by Mr. Colliii 
the above article was adopted unanimously, and the amount to be expended up to the sum of $500, 00- j 

Article 55. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds and appropria, 
the sum of three hundred dollars ($300. 00) or any other sum therefor, for the Wilmington Council for the 
Aging or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Frank H. McLean and others. Finance Committee d- 
approved. On a motion by Mr. McLean it was voted to pass over the article. 

Article 56. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Town Manager to appoint a committee of five mem 
bers said committee to investigate and report to the next annual town meeting or earlier on the possibility i 
the town constructing an outdoor skating rink having mechanical refrigeration, or do anything in relation 

96 i 



;reto. Request of Larz Neilson and others. Finance Committee approved. Motion by Mr. Neilson - 
nove that the Town vote to instruct the Town Manager to appoint a committee of five persons, that this 
mmittee study and investigate the possibility of the Town building and constructing and operating a muni- 
jal skating rink having mechanical refrigeration, under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 5, of the 
neral Laws, and that this committee report its findings and recommendations at a subsequent Town Meet- 
y not later than the next annual Town Meeting. Voted unanimously. 

Coolidge asked the meeting to stand and show their appreciation for Mr. Hagerty's faithful service to 
; Town as a Selectman and former member of the Board of Health. Mr. Hagerty has taken a position in 
; State of Connecticut, and this is his last Town meeting in Wilmington. 



)tion to adjourn - voted. Adjourned at 10. 05 p. m. 
evening session - 278. 

tal Voted as foil 



crue copy: 
;est: 



liddlesex County ss. 

3 either of the constables of the Town of Wilmington 



Total voters at afternoon session - 402, total voters 



L. Russell 
lerk 



By Taxation $2,076,338.50 

By Transfer 104,023.86 

By Borrowing 13, 000. 00 

Grand Total $2,193,362.36 



(Mrs. ) Esther 
Town C 



WARRANT - THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



(REETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants 

1 said town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in - 

High School Cafeteria - Church Street 
Tuesday, the Twenty-sixth day of April, I960 

E 2. 45 o'clock P. M. , for the following purposes: 

bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Election of Candidates of Political Parties for the 
fllowing offices: 

2 Delegates At Large to the National Convention of the Democratic Party. 

1 Alternate Delegates At Large to the National Convention of the Democratic Party. 
I Delegates At Large to the National Convention of the Republican Party. 

1 Alternate Delegates At Large to the National Convention of the Republican Party. 

District Delegates to the National Convention of the Democratic Party - 5th Congressional District. 
Alternate District Delegates to the National Convention of the Democratic Party - 5th Congressional Dist. 
District Delegates to the National Convention of the Republican Party - 5th Congressional District. 
Alternate District Delegates to the National Convention of the Republican Party - 5th Congressional Dist. 

' District Members of State Committee - (One Man and One Woman) for each political party for the 7th 
Senatorial District. 

2 Members of the Democratic Town Committee. 

3 Members of the Republican Town Committee. 



97 



WARRANT - THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS (Continued) 
Presidential Preference. 

The Polls will be open from 3. 00 p. m. to 8. 00 p. m. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 



Given under our hands this 28th day of March, A. D. , I960. 



Middlesex, SS 



Signed Nicholas L. DeFelice ) 

Wavie M. Drew ) Selectmen 

Donald C. Kidder ) of 

John Brooks ) Wilmington 



Wilmington - April 4, I960 



I this day posted attested copies (9) of the within notice in accordance with the By-Laws of the Town of 
Wilmington, at the following locations; Elia's Store, West Street; North Wilmington Post Office; Elia's Stoi 
Middlesex Avenue; Lucci's Market, Lowell Street; Post Office, Wilmington Square; Bedell's Market, 
Burlington Avenue; Tatersall's, Main Street; Stevens Market, Main Street; and the Police. Fire Station, 
Church Street. 

Signed A. John Imbimbo 

Constable of Wilmington 



RECORD OF PROCEEDINGS OF PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY - Tuesday, April 26, I960 

In accordance with the foregoing Warrant, the meeting was called to order by the presiding officer, j 
Mrs. Wavie M. Drew at 2. 50 p.m. The Warrant was read by Mrs. Drew. I 

I 

The ballot box was examined and found empty, the register indicating 00000. The ballot box was locked an 
the keys delivered to the police officer on duty. At 3. 00 p. m the polls were declared open. At 8. 00 p. m 
the polls were declared closed. 

Democratic ballots on hand at opening of polls - 3793, Democratic ballots cast - 171 = 3622. Two bundl( 
of ballots opened (100 per bundle). Thirty-one (31) ballots unused (2 extra ballots were found in one bundli 
No spoiled ballots. Balance on hand of unused Democratic ballots - 3653. 

Republican ballots on hand at opening of polls - 3979, Republican ballots cast - 124 = 3855. Two bundles 
of ballots opened (100 per biindle). Seventy- seven (77) ballots unused -(1 extra ballot found in a bundle). 
No spoiled ballots. Balance on hand of unused Republican ballots - 3932. 

Total votes cast - 295, per voting check list. Ballot box indicator read 295. 

Following is the vote as announced by the presiding officer. 



98 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



Delegates at Large and Alternate Delegates at 
Large to the National Convention: 

Vote 

Delegates: Cast 

Leverett Saltonstall 118 

rienry Cabot Lodge, Jr. 120 

Joseph W. Martin, Jr. 110 

rhomas A. Pappas 105 

ilalph H. Bonnell 108 

Vlary R. Wheeler • 106 

Daniel E. McLean 107 

Fred Lamson 110 

Frank S. Giles 108 

Robert F. Bradford 1 1 1 

Blanks 137 

Total 1240 

Mternate Delegates: 

Lloyd B. Waring 106 

John A. Volpe 109 

deorgia E. Ireland 101 

Geroge D. Hammond 103 

Bruce Crane 102 

[rene K. Thresher 101 

Richard F. Treadway 103 

Augustus G. Means 106 

Andrew A. Hunter 100 

jeorge L. Sargent 102 

31anks 207 

I 1240 

District Delegates and Alternate District Delegates 
o National Convention - 5th District: 



Delegates at Large and Alternate Delegates at 
Large to the National Convention: 



Delegate s: 
larrison Chadwick 
^aula K. Lewellen 
ilanks 
otal 

alternate Delegates: 
[arold W. Hartwell, Jr. 
i'orothea S. Dodge 
lanks 
otal 



101 
89 
58 

248 



96 
92 
60 
248 



Delegates: 

Foster Furcolo 

John W. McCormack 

John M. Lynch 

Robert F. Murphy 

Joseph D. Ward 

Edward J. McCormack, Jr. 

Thomas J. Buckley 

John F. Collins 

Joseph William Belanger 

John E. Powers 

John F. Thompson 

Endicott Peabody 

Robert Francis Kennedy 

Howard W. Fitzpatrick 

Garrett H. Byrne 

Balcom S. Taylor 

Mary L. Fonseca 

John L. Saltonstall, Jr. 

Betty Taymor 

Stephen T. Chumura 

Bernard Solomon 

Kenneth J. Kelley 

A. Frank Foster 

Thomas J. O'Connor, Jr. 

Blanks 

Alternate Delegates; 

William F. Donoghue 

Charles N. Collatos 

Mary DePasquale Murray 

Peter J. R zeznikiewicz 

Edward King 

Joseph A. DeGuglielmo 

Cornelius W. Phillips, Jr. 

Anthony M. Scibelli 

Richard Maguire 

Paul W. Glennon 

Dan H. Fenn, Jr. 

Thomas J. Noonan 

Blanks 

Total 



Vote 
Cast 
135 
130 
127 
124 
120 
128 
125 
132 
112 
123 
113 
125 
128 
127 
115 
113 
1 12 
124 
113 
113 
114 
116 
116 
119 
1200 
4104 

116 
106 
107 
104 
110 
107 
102 
102 
107 
103 
105 
110 
773 
2052 



elegate: 

oy Charles Papalia 

ilanks 

otal 



7 

117 
124 



99 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 

State Committee 7th District (Man): 

Alan G. Adams 

Blanks 

Total 

State Committee 7th District (Woman) : 

Paula K. Lewellen 

Blanks 

Total 

Town Committee: 
E. Hayward Bliss 
Wavie M. Drew 
John Robert Evans 
Paul G. Godzyk 
Donald C. Kidder 
Ruth M. Kitchener 
Mary E. Murphy 
Howard J. Murphy 
Ralph B. Odiorne 
Hazel W. Odiorne 
Elinor S. Poloian 
Maude W. Richardson 
Roland I. Wood 
James E. Poloian 
Henrietta C. Tuttle 
Charles H. Black 
John C. Lapper 
Helen M. Reynolds 
Melvin L. Cassidy 
Philip E. Nelson 
Mabel W. Ingalls 
M. Flora Kasabuski 
Augustus T. Norton, Jr. 
Ernest E. Ardolino 
Norbert L. Sell 
Betty Jane Evans 
Albert E. Kitchener 
Winthrop S. Polsey 
Florence B. Polsey 
Ernest J. Castonguay 
Norma J. Castonguay 
Madelon C. Slater 
Arnold F. Lanni 
John J. Savko 
Millard C. Pipes 
Blanks 
Total 

Presidential Preference: 
Richard Nixon 
Barry Goldwater 
Dwight Eisenhower 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Vote Vot( 

Cast District Delegates and Alternate District Cas 

107 Delegates to National Convention 5th District 
17 

124 Delegates: 

Cornelius F. Kiernan 114 

Edward P. Gilgun 121 

96 Richard K. Donahue 128 
28 Daniel D. O'Dea 111 

124 Blanks 210 

Total 684 

115 Alternate Delegates: 

115 Charles F. J. Harrington 108 

109 Helen G. Droney 109 

109 Blanks IZ5_ 

109 Total 342 
110 

102 Delegate: 

102 David Franklin 14 

106 Blanks 157 

105 Total 171 
98 

99 State Committee 7th District (Man): 

109 Stanley J. Bocko 40 

98 Firmo Correa 5 

99 Richard K. Donahue 85 
1 17 Harold J. Lee 10 

101 Blanks 3 1 
99 Total TtT 

97 

98 State Committee 7th District (Woman): 

100 Helen Gilbride Droney 80 

105 Margaret Nickles 47 

104 Blanks 44 
100 Total 171 
104 

102 Town Committee: 

110 James L. McLaughlin 120 

97 Edward J. Curtis 104 

98 James P. Donahue 109 
95 Edward F. McLaughlin 112 

95 Ralph D. Peterson 95 

105 Cecil W. Cantrell, Jr. 107 

96 Frank J. Nelson 94 

97 Rene J. LaRivee 108 
102 Mary L. Cunningham 108 
733 Alice T. Ryan 106 

4340 Henry J. Gregory 104 

Ernest M. Crispo 127 

Phyllis M. O'Leary 118 

98 Elizabeth Kelley 

1 Timothy J. Kane lOS 

1 Alfred E. Lynch 1 H 



100 



l1 • -< 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



residential Preference (Continued): 
kelson Rockefeller 
^enry Cabot Lodge 
Dirksen 
Blanks 
Total 



Vote 
Cast 

3 
1 
1 

19 
124 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



Town Committee (Continued): 

Franklin E. Britt 

Oliver A. Aruda 

Gerald A. Fagan 

Eleanor F. O'Keeffe 

Mary A. Grimes 

Francis J. Hagerty 

Edward J. Shelley 

Mary S. McLaughlin 

Anna M. Visconti 

Thomas J. Reidy, Jr. 

Francis X. Lewis 

William E. Donahue 

John J. Slattery 

Harlow A. Miller 

Louis Picanso 

Charles M. Kelley 

Maynard C. Eaton 

Fayette G. Cantrell 

John Rees 

Paul Ryan 

William V. Bovitz 

James A. Tildsley 

Simon Cutter 

Robert H. Barry 

Daniel E. O'Keeffe 

Edward F. McLaughlin, Jr. 

Francis A. Mulholland 

Fred F. Cain 

Jean M. Lewis 

William C. Hennessy 

Joseph Leo Berrett 

MaryT. Mulholland 

Paul H. Niles 

E. Harrison Rideout 

Howard R. Whitman 

James Leo Woods 

William Rogers 

William Smith 

P. Reese 

Richard McLaughlin 
Richard Harding 
Blanks 
Total 



Vote 
Cast 

104 
94 

122 

112 

117 

100 

114 

110 
45 
19 
25 
3 
23 
24 
19 
16 
18 
16 
9 

16 
5 
5 
18 
17 
17 
14 
14 
39 
23 
8 
14 
7 
25 
3 



p. 

'0 s 

c 



3 

291 1 
5985 



true copy: 
best: 



(Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



Presidential Preference: 

Kennedy 

Stevenson 

Johnson 

Humphrey 

Blanks 

Total 



135 
5 
1 
1 

29 
171 



101 



WARRANT FOR STATE PRIMARY - TUESDAY, SEPT. 13, I960 
TOWN OF WILMINGTON - COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Middlesex County SS. 

To: Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington 



GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of said town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in the 



High School Cafeteria, Church Street 
Tuesday, the Thirteenth Day of September, I960 



at 12. 45 o'clock P. M. for the following purposes: 



To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Nomination of Candidates of Political Parties for th 
following offices: 



Senator in Congress 
Governor 

Lieutenant Governor 

Secretary of the Commonwealth 

Attorney General 

Treasurer and Receiver-General 

Auditor of the Commonwealth 

Representative in Congress 

Councillor 

Senator 

2 - Representatives in General Court 

Register of Probate and Insolvency 

2 - County Commissioners 

County Treasurer 

District Attorney (to fill vacancy) 



For this Commonwealth 



5th Congressional District 
6th Councillor District 
7th Senatorial District 
18th Representative District 
Middlesex County 
Middlesex County 
Middlesex County 
Northern District 



The polls will be open from 1. 00 P. M. to 8. 00 P. M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 25th Day of August, A. D. I960 



Signed Nicholas L. DeFe 

Wavie M. Drew 
John Brooks 
Donald C. Kidder 



lice ) 

) Board of 
) Selectmen 
) 



Return of Service 

Middlesex, SS. Wilmington, Massachusetts August 26, I960 

I this day posted attested copies of the within notice at the following named places; Wilmington Post Office, 
Main Street; North Wilmington Post Office, Middlesex Avenue; Bedell's Market, Burlington Avenue; Elia's 
Store, Lowell Street; Elia's Country Store, Middlesex Avenue; Lucci's Market, Lowell Street; Police Stati 
Adelaide Street; Fire Station, Church Street; Tatersall's, Main Street. All are located in said Wilmingto 

A true copy: Signed A. John Imbimbo 

Attest: Constable of Wilmington 



A true copy: 
Attest: 



Signed 
102 



(Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



STATE PRIMARY ELECTION - September 13, I960 
High School Cafeteria, Church Street, Wilmington, Mass. 



In accordance with the foregoing warrant the meeting was called to order by the Deputy Warden, 
Mrs. Esther L. Russell, at 12. 45 P. M. The ballot box was examined by the Deputy Warden, Police Office 
and Ballot Box Clerk. The ballot box was found to be empty and registered 00000. The keys were delivere 
to the Police Officer in charge. 

The Deputy Warden read the Warrant. Upon a motion by Mr. Ring the Warrant was accepted as read. The 
election workers were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties. Two ballot clerks counted and dis- 
tributed the ballots to the other ballot clerks. The Polls were declared open at 1. 00 P. M. 

Following is the result of the Election as announced by the Warden: 

REPUBLICAN PARTY 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



Senator in Congress: 
Leverett Saltonstall 
Blanks 

Governor: 



John A. Volpe 
Blanks 

Lieutenant Governor: 



Augustus G. Means 

Blanks 

Others 

Secretary: 
Edward W. Brooke 
Blanks 

Attorney General: 
George Michaels 
Blanks 

Treasurer: 



Walter J. Trybulski 
Francis Andrew Walsh 
Blanks 
Others 

Auditor: 

Gardner B. Wardwell 
Blanks 

Congressman : 

F. Bradford Morse 

Samuel S. Pollard 

Others 

Blanks 



Vote s 
371 
17 
388 



370 

18 
388 

372 
15 

1_ 

388 

358 
30 
388 

360 
28 
388 

226 
139 
20 
3 

388 

367 
21 
388 

182 
15 
I 

190 

388 



Senator in Congress: 
Foster Furcolo 
Edmund C. Buckley 
Thomas J. O'Connor, Jr. 
Blanks 

Governor: 



Joseph D. Ward 
Francis E. Kelly 
John F. Kennedy 
Alfred Magaletta 
Robert F. Murphy 
Endicott Peabody 
Gabriel Francis Piemonte 
Blanks 

Lieutenant Governor: 
Edward F. McLaughlin, Jr. 
Pasquale Caggiano 
Blanks 

Secretary: 
Kevin H. White 
Francis X. Ahearn 
Margaret F. McGovern 
Blanks 

Attorney General: 

Edward J. McCormack, Jr. 

Blanks 

Treasurer: 



John Thomas Driscoll 
George F. Hurley 
John B. Kennedy 
John M. Kennedy 
Patrick F. McDonough 
Robert J. Sullivan 
Blanks 



103 



Votes 
260 
115 
352 
55 
782 

189 
152 
62 
13 
116 
203 
39 

8 

782 

628 
130 
24 
782 

315 
251 
169 
47 
782 

678 
104 
782 

261 
52 
92 
32 

200 
86 
59 

782 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 

Vote s 



Councillor: 

William A. Warren 355 
Blanks 33 

388 

Senator: 

Arthur J. Gorrasi 348 
Blanks 40 

388 

Representatives in General Court (vote for two): 
Frank D. Tanner 370 
Lester W. Bowen 315 
Others 1 
Blanks 90 

776 

Register of Probate and Insolvency: 

Hobart M. Burroughs 355 
Blanks 33 

388 

County Commissioners (vote for two): 
William G. Andrew 241 
Carleton R. Leavitt 132 
Frederick Lowe 121 
Edward C. Uehlein 79 
John J. White 125 
Blanks 78 

776 

County Treasurer: 

Edward James O'Donoghue 38 
Others 6 
Blanks 344 

388 

District Attorney: 

George P. Jeffreys 142 
James F. Mahan 130 
Richard S. Sanderson 82 
Blanks 34 

388 

TOTAL REPUBLICAN VOTERS 388 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Vote 

Auditor: 

Thomas J. Buckley 574 

John F. Hynes 147 

Blanks 61 

782 

Congre ssman: 

Thomas F. Duffy, Jr. 165 

David Franklin 20 

Michael J. MacDonald 137 

William C. Madden 308 

Ethel M. Simpson 79 

F. Bradford Morse 4 

Samuel S. Pollard 15 

Blanks 54 

782 

Councillor: 

Joseph Ray Crimmins 268 

James J. Buckley 57 

Robert E. Buckley 54 

William J. Deignan 34 

James J. Dougherty 64 

Francis J. Lane 40 

Raymond J. Raney 20 

Patrick J. Walsh 176 

Blanks 69 

782 

Senator: 

Lawrence F. Hurley 65 

James J. Long 142 

Harold W. McKelvey 334 

Raymond Stevenson 13 

William R. Sullivan 179 

Blanks 49 

782 

Representatives in General Court (vote for two): 

Thomas F. Donohue 634 

John R. McLaughlin 533 

Blanks 397 

1564 

Register of Probate and Insolvency: 

John V. Harvey 515 

Blanks 267 

782 

County Commissioners: (vote for two) 

Edward L. Buckley 224 

William P. Bowen 15 

Lawrence W. Brennan 33 

Patrick J. Brennan 19 

Brown J. Caldwell 9 

Theodore Campo 29 

Joseph J. Corcoran 18 

James A. Cullen 86 

James W. Donahue 127 



104 



The polls were declared closed at 8. 00 p. m. 

The ballot box read 1171 due to the fact that one ballot jammed and caused the bell to ring twice, 
total vote was - One Thousand One H\mdred and Seventy (1170). 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 




DEMOCRATIC PARTY 






Votes 




Vote s 


County Commissioners (vote for two) 


- continued 


County Treasurer: 




Raymond E. Ennis 


24 


Timothy J. Cronin 


296 


Donald F. Fenton 


74 


Thomas B. Brennan 


101 


Francis M. Fitzpatrick 


25 


John B. Brown 


14 


George A. Galgay 


5 


Christopher Carolina 


18 


Anthony Galluccio 


40 


Frank M. DeFino 


60 


Charles W. Gately 


18 


Francis R. King 


35 


Francis J. Harrington 


7 


Francis J. Murphy 


76 


Stephen F. Hartigan 


24 


Cornelius R. Sullivan 


102 


Daniel L. Hurley 


18 


Bl anks 


80 


Edward J. Kenney 


8 




782 


John Mahoney 


31 


District Attorney: 




James L. McLaughlin 


406 


John J. Droney 


423 


Paul M. McLaughlin 


8 


John F. Zamparelli 


318 


Frederick R. McMenimen 


18 


Blanks 


41 


John T. O'Brien 


17 




782 


John Joseph Ryan, Jr. 


13 






John Sarno 


9 


TOTAL DEMOCRATIC VOTERS 


782 


Charles M. Sullivan 


10 






William A. Sullivan 


22 






Albert W. Zarella 


28 






Blanks 


199 
1564 







The actual 



Ballots received from the State House 



Republican 
Democratic 



3822 
3724 



used - 388 
used - 782 



A true copy: 
Attest: 



+ 1 void Balance unused 3433 
Balance unused 2942 



(Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



E ■ 



3 

c 
E 



105 



WARRANT FOR THE SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - September 12, I960 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



To: Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

Greetings: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-laws 
of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the town qualified to vote in Town 
affairs to meet and assemble at the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium on Monday, the twelfth day of Septembe] 
next at 8. 00 P. M. , to consider and act on the following Articles: - 

Mr. Simon Cutter, moderator and Mr. Charles Black, Selectman met at the above auditori\im at 8. 00 P. M. 
on Monday, September 12, I960. Mr. Black moved that further reading of the warrant be dispensed with 
and that the meeting adjourn to the Barrows Auditorium, on Church Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts on 
September 19, I960 at 8. 00 P. M. This action was taken due to the fact that hurricane "Donna" was then 
blowing at gale force through the town. 



ADJOURNED SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - September 19. I960 



The moderator called the meeting to order at 8. 35 P. M. Mr. Cutter stated that he would not read the 
entire warrant at this time unless requested but each article would be read prior to action thereon. There 
being no objection this procedure was followed. 

Article 1: To see if the Town will vote to accept a sum of money as a gift from the East Wilmington Im- 
provement Association, said gift to be held and invested as a trust fund, the income thereof to be used for 
the purchase of juvenile books for the Wilmington Public Library. The name of this trust fund to be the Eas 
Wilmington Improvement Association Trust Fund. On request of the East Wilmington Improvement Associa 
tion. Finance Committee approved. 

Motion by Mrs. Drew: I move that the Town vote to accept the sum of Three Thousand Eight Hundred 
Twenty Dollars ($3,820. 00) as a gift from the East Wilmington Improvement Association, said gift to be hel 
and invested as a trust fund, the income thereof to be used for the purchase of juvenile books for the 
Wilmington Public Library. The name of this trust to be the East Wilmington Improvement Association 
Trust Fund. Motion approved unanimously. 

Article 2: To see if the Town will vote to transfer the following described parcel of land from the Wildwoc 
Cemetery to the Town of Wilmington for Highway purposes: Beginning at the point where the present right 
of-way line meets a stone wall on the boundary line between the land of Stevens and the Wildwood Cemetery, 
and approximately 400 feet from the intersection of Middlesex Avenue and Federal Street; thence southerly 
along Federal Street a distance of approximately 577 feet; thence westerly to the proposed right-of-way line 
then N 41o28' 21"W, 561 feet along said right-of-way line to the beginning of a curb; thence northerly along 
said curve with a radius of 430 feet, approximately 16 feet to the center of the stone wall thence easterly 
along said stone wall a distance of approximately 15 feet to the point of beginning, containing approximately 
7, 000 square feet or do anything in relation thereto. On request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance 
Committee approved. Motion: On a motion by Mr. Donald Kidder the above article was approved un- 

animously. 

Article 3: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Chief of the Fire Department or any appropriate 
officer or officers of the Town to execute an agreement between the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and 
the Town or its Fire Department relative to the relocation of the Town's Fire Alarm System from the poles 
of the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company on Salem Street to an underground duct installed by 
the Town made necessary by the construction in a new location of a portion of Interstate Highway Route #93, 
as a State Highway, or do anything in relation thereto. On request of the Chief of the Fire Department. 

106 



irticle 3: (continued) 



'inance Committee approved. Motion: On 
lously . 



a motion by Mr. Boudreau the above article was approved unani- 



.rticle 4: 



J° V^t "^'^^ authorize the Selectmen to execute, on behalf of the Town a 'Coooeration 

greemenf between the Town and the Wilmington Housing Authority orovidina for th. ^ ^ Cooperation 

ertain streets, crediting the Town for the cost of certain of the foregoing anrother formfof ^'"P^^"^'^^ 
opies of a draft of which proposed agreement are on file in the office of the Selectmen t^ wiT 
ousing Authority, and the Town Clerk, or will take any other action wTth resplct t'erltl ^''^'^^'^^^ , 
.e Wilmington Housing Authority. Finance Committee approved On a m tTon b^ Mr DoL^d^dderlt 
as voted unanimously to take up Article #5 first and dispose of that article before voting on art^cfe #4 

.T^Sllchl;;; IZl of^heTe^e^aXt^^T^ ^E^r^""^ V''^^. ''^^ °^ ^^'^^^'^ 

^lo f ^ r ^ne^enerai l.aws (Ter. Ed. ) as most recently amended, will appropriate from avail 

.le funds a sum of money for the purpose of defraying such part of the development acquis7t!on an^ 

aerating costs of the 'Wilmington Center' Urban Renewal Project in the Town of WnminTo. M t 

J will not be met by loans, contributions, or grants from the Vedera^GoveTL nT oro^^^^^^^ 

sar ^"^^^t" ' °' Emergency Finance Board to borrow the whole or Iny paT of 

ou sin^ Act ot 949 / T''^ ^ ''"^'^^ "^^^^"^ accordance with Title I of the 

'nera\Ty 'Wilmington Center' Urban Renewal Project Massachusetts R- IZ ild bo!^nded 

Commencing at a point formed by the projected curb lines of Main Street (State Route #38 and 
numbered Route 129) and Church Street (numbered Route 62) at the southeasterly corner of the 
intersection and proceeding clockwise around the Project Area, the boundary extends in a 
northerly direction for a distance of seventy-five feet (75'*) at which point the boundary then 
changes to a southwesterly direction for a distance of fifty'feet (50' +) to a point formed by the 

Rorr2^^°t t°h "r^"^' ^^^^^ °^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^ B^rUn^d AvenL (nuTb^red ' 

Koute 62) at the northwestern corner of this intersection. A 

f?el nOO^lVl"'' tr"'r.t'' '""^ '""^^ southwesterly direction for a distance of one hundred 
leet (100 +) along the abutting property line of the Boston & Maine Railroad. 

From this point the boundary then follows an arching curved line in a northeasterly direction to 

uZt T T"' "^''^ intersecting curb lines of Main Street and 

Middlesex Avenue at the northeasterly corner of this intersection. B 

L\Z '^t' boundary follows in an easterly direction for a distance of thirty-one feet 

\^rli T ^ 'northeasterly direction along the Boston and Maine property line coincident 
with the abutting lots #30. #31. and #33. At this point the boundary t'hen'foUows the no therlv 
sex Ivenue ^o-^dary line of lots #33 and #34 to a point at the northern curb line of Middle- 

toZ boundary crosses Middlesex Avenue in a curving line which is coincident 

Adetidri' '"'^ °' Adelaide Street thence, along the curb line of 

Strllt • """"^^ *° ^ ^"'^"^^^ the eastern curb line of Beacon 

Street joining the southern curb line of Church Street. 



ft 
1. 

O 

Eg 

u 

c 



107 



The boundary then extends in a southwesterly direction along the southern curb line of Church 
Street closing upon the point of origin which is at the southeasterly corner of Church Street. 

FOOTNOTES: 

A. Burlington Avenue terminates at the center line of Main Street. 

B. This boundary being just behind all the buildings that immediately abut upon the Boston & 
Maine roadbed so that these buildings are included within the project area. All trackage 
and necessary signalling devices are excluded. Although this is a generally described- 
line the intent is to prevent undue severance of trackage or signalling devices of railroad 
sidings not to be included. This elaboration is essential because the buildings in this 
section are so situated that no horizontal measurement can be established as a set distance 
from the buildings along this section of the railroad bed. 

Such project will include the acquisition of land in the Project Area; the demolition or removal of buildings 
and improvements; the installation, construction or reconstruction of street, utilities and other site impro 
ments; and making the land available for development or redevelopment by private enterprise or public 
agencies as authorized by law. The proposals of the Wilmington Housing Authority with respect to re- 
location of site residents will be open for discussion at this hearing. On request of the Wilmington Housin 
Authority. 

The Finance Committee approved the Article. 

Motion by Mr. William Smith, member of the Housing Authority: I move that the Town appropriate the su 
of Two Hundred Seventy-five Thousand Dollars ($275, 000) for the purpose of defraying such part of the 
development, acquisition, and operating costs of the 'Wilmington Center' Urban Renewal Project Mass. R- 
in the Town of Wilmington as will not be met by loans, contributions or grants from the Federal Governm 
or otherwise and that to meet such appropriations, the Treasurer, with approval of the Selectmen, be auth 
ized to borrow Two Hundred Seventy-five Thousand Dollars ($275, 000) \inder Section 26CC of Chapter 121 
the General Laws as amended. 

Mr. Michelson, member of the Finance Committee stated that his committee had approved this article but 
at that time they had not been informed that the Federal Agency had not committed itself to any specific 
amount of money. Mr. Buzzell, Town Counsel was asked for his opinion. Mr. Buzzell stated that unc 

the statute the Town cannot borrow money for this purpose, because the Federal Government had not agrei 
to render financial assistance as required in Chapter 121, Section 26 CC. A motion to table the article 
was lost - Yes - 19, No - 474. 

Mr. Arthur Lynch moved the 'Previous Question'. The vote was in favor of closing arguments. 
Yes - 411, No - 143. 

The moderator stated the Main Motion and called for a vote. The moderator declared the motion LOST. 

The moderator returned to Article #4. Mr. William Smith moved the adoption of the following motion - 
I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to execute, on behalf of the Town a "Cooperation 
Agreement" between the Town and the Wilmington Housing Authority, providing for the cooperation requir 
by the Urban Renewal Administration of the Housing and Home Finance Agency with respect to Land Asser 
and Redevelopment Plan for the "Wilmington Center" area in the Town of Wilmington; said agreement con 
taining provisions with respect to making cash grants-in-aid, constructing public improvements, conveyir 
Town owned land to the extent required, vacating certain streets, altering and widening certain streets, 
improving certain streets, crediting the Town for the cost of certain of the foregoing, and other forms of 
cooperation; copies of a draft of which proposed agreement are on file in the office of the Selectmen, the 
Wilmington Housing Authority, and the Town Clerk. The moderator called for a vote. The moderator 
declared the motion LOST. 



108 



Article 6: To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 418 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts authorizing the Wilmington Housing Authority to take by eminent domain certain land located 
in the Town of Wilmington. On request of the Wilmington Housing Authority. Finance Committee approved. 
On a motion by Mr. Smith it was voted unanimously to pass over the article. 



Article 7: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Single 
Resident A District to General Business District the following described parcel of land: Beginning at a 
point at the intersection of a line parallel with Main Street and at a distance of seven hundred and fifty feet 
(750') to the east of said street, and a line parallel with Middlesex Avenue and at a distance of one hundred 
and fifty feet (150') to the north of said avenue, and thence running N-140 15' 40" W a distance of twenty-eight 
feet (28. 00') on the extension of the line parallel with Main Street; thence S-50O- 43'E a distance of twenty 
feet (ZO. 00'); thence S- 18Q. 38' W a distance of seventeen feet (17') on a line parallel with Middlesex Avenue 
to the point of beginning, or do anything in relation thereto. On request of the Planning Board. Finance 
Committee approved Planning Board action. On a motion by Mr. William Beers it was voted unanimously 
to pass over the article. 



Article 8: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Single Resi- 
dence B District to General Business District the following described parcel of land: Beginning at the inter- 
section of the center lines of Church Street and Adelaide Street and thence running along the center line of 
Church Street S-42 - 16'W, five hundred and twenty-three and seven tenths (523. 7) feet; thence running on 
a line, parallel with Main Street at a distance of seven hundred and fifty feet (750') east of said Main Street 
on the bearing N-14 -15' -40" W a distance of nine hundred and seventy-eight (978) feet; thence on a line ^ 
N-18 -38' E a distance of seventeen feet (17'); thence S-50 -43' E, a distance of one hundred and sixteen i 
(116) feet; thence N-77 -4' - 45" E a distance of forty-six and forty-seven hundreds (46. 47) to the center ^ 
lines intersection of Middlesex Avenue and Adelaide Street; thence S- 41 -19' E a distance of six hundred j 
seventy-nine and nine tenths (679. 9) along the center line of relocated Adelaide Street to the point of beginn- „ i 

ing, or do anything in relation thereto. On request of the Planning Board. Finance Committee approved 
Planning Board action. On a motion by Mr. William Beers it was voted unanimously to pass over the article. 

Motion to adjourn - voted. Adjourned at 9- 50 P. M. Six Hundred and eleven (611) voters were checked 3 53 

on the voting list. L? 

A true copy: (Mrs. ) Esther L Russell 

.\ttest: Town Clerk ,|s 

STATE ELECTION - November 8, I960 



Varrant: To either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington. 

Greetings: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-laws 
if said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified by law to vote, 
o meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium on Tuesday, the eighth day of November next at 5. 45 
'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be open at 6. 00 A. M. and shall be closed at 8. 00 P. M. , for the election 
f the following: Presidential Electors, Senator in Congress, Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary, 
i-ttorney General, Treasurer, Auditor, Representative in Congress, Councillor, Senator, 2 Representatives 
n General Court, Register of Probate and Insolvency, 2 County Commissioners, County Treasurer, District 
ittorney and vote YES or NO on the following question: 



buestion # 1 : 

*l. Shall licenses be granted in the town for the sale therein of all alcoholic beverages (whisky, rum, gin, 
" lalt beverages, wines and all other alcoholic beverages)? YES NO 



109 



Que stion # 1 : 

B. Shall licenses be granted in this town for the sale therein of wines and malt beverages (wines and beer, 
ale and all other malt beverages)? YES NO 

C. Shall licenses be granted in this town for the sale therein of all alcoholic beverages in packages, so 
called, not to be drunk on the premises? YES NO 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant, or a certified copy thereof, with your doings thereon, 
to the Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

Given under our hands and seal of said Town this 25th day of October, A. D. , One Thousand Nine Hundred 
and Sixty. 

Signed Nicholas L. DeFelice ) 
Charles H. Black ) 
John D. Brooks ) Board 

Wavie M. Drew ) of 

Donald C. Kidder ) Selectmen 



RETURN OF SERVICE: 

Middlesex SS Wilmington, October 27, I960 

I this day posted attested copies of the within notice at the following locations: Post Office, Main Street; 
Post Office, Middlesex Avenue; Elia's Store, West Street; Lucci's Market, Lowell Street; Bedell's Market, 
Burlington Avenue; Tatter sail' s , Main Street; Police Station, Adelaide Street and the Fire Station, Church 
Street, all in said Wilmington. 

Signed A. John Imbimbo 

Constable of Wilmington 

In accordance with the foregoing Warrant the meeting was called to order by the Warden who read the 
Warrant at 5. 45 A. M. The two new ballot boxes were opened in the presence of the Warden, Deputy Warde: 
Town Clerk and the Police Officer on duty. Both boxes were found to be empty and the register on each 
indicated 00000. Each ballot box was then locked and the keys given to the Police Officer. 

The ballots were delivered to the Ballot Clerks; seven boxes of ballots properly sealed and said to contain 
five thousand nine hundred and twenty-one (5921) ballots. 

The Polls were declared open at 6. 00 A. M. The Polls were declared closed at 8. 00 P. M. There were 
Five Thousand Three Hundred Six (5306) ballots cast. 

At 8. 00 P. M. the Warden called the roll of sixty (60) tellers who were then sworn to the faithful performanci 
of their dutie s . 

All of the ballots cast were sorted, counted, recorded and declaration thereof made, as by law is directed, 
and were for the following, namely: 

Votes 

Electors of President and Vice President 

Decker and Munn, One 1 
Hass and Cozzini, Three 3 
Kennedy and Johnson, Two thousand eight hundred four 2804 
Nixon and Lodge, Two thousand four hundred sixty-two 2462 
Blanks , Thirty-two 32 

Others, Four 4 

5306 



110 



Senator in Congress: 

Leverett Saltonstall, Three thousand two hvmdred fifty-two 
Thomas J. O'Connor, Jr. , One thousand nine hundred ninety-seven 
Lawrence Gilfedder, Five 
MarkR. Shaw, Seven 
Blanks, Forty-five 

Governor: 



John A. Volpe, Two thousand nine hundred eighty-five 
Joseph D. Ward, Two thousand two hundred seven 
Henning A. Blomen, Nineteen 
Guy S. Williams, Sixteen 
Blanks, Seventy-nine 

Lieutenant Governor: 

Edward F. McLaughlin, Jr. , Two thousand five hundred seventy- seven 
Augustus G. Means, Two thousand five h\indred ninety- six 
Thomas Maratea, Ten 
Francis A. Votano, Twelve 
Blanks, One hundred eleven 

Secretary: 

Edward W. Brooke, Two thousand six hundred eighty-one 
Kevin H. White, Two thousand four hundred fifty-two 
Fred M. Ingersoll, Sixteen 
Julia B. Kohler, Eleven 
Blanks, One hundred forty- six 

Attorney General: 

Edward J. McCormack, Jr. , Two thousand eight hundred sixty-seven 
George Michaels, Two thousand two hundred eighty-three 
August O. Johnson, Twenty-one 
William D. Ross, Twelve 
Blanks, One hundred twenty-three 

Treasurer: 



John Thomas Driscol], Two thousand eight hundred sixty-four 
Walter J. Trybulski, Two thousand two hundred twenty-eight 
Warren C. Carberg, Seventeen 
Domenico A. DiGirolamo, Sixteen 
Blanks, One hundred eighty-one 

Auditor: 



Thomas J. Buckley, Three thousand three hundred fifteen 

Gardner B. Wardwell, One thousand eight hundred thirty-five 

John B. Lauder, Four 

Arne A. Sortell, Nine 

Blanks, One hundred forty-three 

Congre s sman: 

William C. Madden, Two thousand three hundred sixty-one 
F. Bradford Morse, Two thousand eight hundred fifty-eight 
Blanks, Eighty-seven 



Votes 

3252 
1997 
5 
7 

45 

5306 

2985 
2207 
19 
16 

79 

5306 

2577 
2596 
10 
12 
1 1 1 
5306 

2681 
2452 

16 

1 1 
146 
5306 

2867 
2283 
21 
12 
123 
5306 

2864 
2228 
17 
16 
181 
5306 



3315 
1835 
4 
9 

143 
5306 

2361 
2858 

87 

5306 



L 

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U 

c 



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111 



Councillor: 

Joseph Ray Crimmins, Two thousand eight hundred five 
William A. Warren, Two thousand two hundred sixty-five 
Blanks, Two hundred thirty- six 

Senator: 

Arthur J. Gorrasi, Two thousand two hundred sixty-seven 
James J. Long, Two thousand eight hundred forty-four 
Blanks, One hundred ninety -five 

Representatives in General Court: 

Thomas F. Donohue , Two thousand eight hundred eighty-two 
Frank D. Tanner, Two thousand six hundred eighty- six 
Lester W. Bowen, One thousand seven hundred fifteen 
John R. McLaughlin, One thousand nine hundred eighty-one 
Blanks, One thousand three hundred forty-five 
Others, Three 

Register of Probate and Insolvency: 

John V. Harvey, Two thousand eight hundred twenty-four 
Hobart M. Burroughs, Two thousand two hundred ten 
Blanks, Two hundred seventy-two 

County Commissioners: 

William G. Andrew, Two thousand six hundred seventy-eight 
Edward L. Buckley, Two thousand eight hundred fifty-nine 
Anthony Galluccio, One Thousand eight hundred fifty-three 
Carleton R. Leavitt, One thousand nine hundred seventy-nine 
Blanks, One thousand two hundred forty-three 

County Treasurer: 

Timothy J. Cronin, Two thousand eight hundred seventy-three 
Edward James O'Donoghue, Two thousand two hundred sixteen 
Blanks, Two hundred seventeen 

District Attorney: 

John J. Droney, Two thousand eight hundred forty-four 
James F. Mahan, Two thousand two hundred seventy-five 
Blanks, One hundred eighty-seven 

Que stion No. 1 : 



Votes 

2805 
2265 
236 
5306 

2267 
2844 
195 
5306 

2882 
2686 
1715 
1981 
1345 

3 

10612 

2824 
2210 
272 
5306 

2678 
2859 
1853 
1979 
1243 
10612 

2873 
2216 
217 
5306 

2844 
2275 
187 



5306 



A. Shall licenses be granted in this city (or town) for the sale therein of all alcoholic beverages (whisky, 
rum, gin, malt beverages, wines and all other alcoholic beverages)? 



B. Shall licenses be granted in this city (or town) for the sale therein of wines and malt 
beverages (wines and beer, ale and all other malt beverages)? 



Yes 


1232 


No 


3608 


Blanks 


466 




5306 


Yes 


1262 


No 


3490 


Blanks 


554 




5306 



112 



Question No. l; 

C. Shall licenses be granted in this city (or town) for the sale therein of all alcoholic beverages in packages, 
so called, not to be drunk on the premises? 

Yes 4073 
No 978 
Blanks 255 
5306 



Within one hour after the closing of the polls, and after the ballots cast were removed from the ballot boxes, 
the Warden and Deputy Warden examined all postmarks and affidavits on the Absentee ballots which were 
delivered to them by the Town Clerk. After making a public announcement of the names of the absent voters 
ballots which were properly executed, their names were checked on the voting list and the ballot deposited 
in the ballot box. One hundred and six absent ballots (106) were cast. 



Total on "A - K" Ballot box as shown on indicator 2628 
Total on "L - Zi' Ballot box as shown on indicator 2572 

5200 

Absent voters ballots cast 106 
Total votes cast 5306 

There were eight (8) spoiled ballots. Seven hundred and eighteen (718) unused ballots returned to the Town 
Clerk. After the declaration of the vote, the meeting was adjourned at 7. 00 A. M. , 1 1 /9/60. 

A true copy: (Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell ^ 

Attest: Town Clerk -. 

A 

IJ 

WARRANT FOR THE SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - Nov. 28, I960 | Sl 

WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 1 ^ 

\U 

To: Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington. £ 

'c 

Greetings: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-laws ^ 
of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified by law to vote 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium on Monday, November 28, I960, 
at 8. 00 P. M. to consider and act on the following Articles - 



The meeting was called to order at 8. 25 P. M. Mr. Black moved that further reading of the Warrant be 
dispensed with and this was so voted. 

Mr. Cutter stated that he would not read the entire article as it came up for action but only refer to it by 
nvimber since each motion contained the same text. There being no objection, this procedure was followed. 

Article 1 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds, and appropriate a sum of money 
for the purchase of radio equipment for the Fire Department, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of 
the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved. On a motion by Mr. DeFelice it was voted to transfer 
from available funds, and appropriate the sum of $2, 561. 75 for the purchase of radio equipment for the Fire 
Department. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds, and appropriate a sum of money 
for the purpose of relocating the railroad automatic gates and Western Union equipment on Concord Street, 
or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved. On a 
motion by Mr. DeFelice it was voted to transfer from available funds and appropriate the sum of $6,923. 12. 

113 



i 



Article 3: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acquir- 
ing a site for an additional pumping station and well field for the Water Department and constructing and 
equipping a pumping station on such site and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise; and further to see if the Town will vote to auth- 
orize the Selectmen or Board of Water Commissioners to purchase or take by eminent domain for such pur- 
poses certain parcels of land on Chestnut Street as shown on a plan dated November 14, I960 made by the 
Town Engineer, and on file in the office of the Town Clerk, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the 
Board of Water Commissioners. The Finance Committee approved the article providing there was no 

money involved at this time. Mr. Waldo A. Stevens moved the adoption of the above article. After a 
lengthy discussion a standing vote was taken. Yes - 38, No - 353. Motion was lost. 

Article 4: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to acquire additional land 
for constructing, originally equipping and furnishing an intermediate school on land owned or to be acquired 
by the Town in North Wilmington, determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, and to authorize and instruct the Permanent 
Building Committee to enter into contracts and to do all things necessary for constructing, equipping and 
furnishing said intermediate school or take any action in relation thereto. Request of the Permanent Build- 
ing Committee. 

Finance Committee: It is recommended that a total of $1,050,000 be appropriated. 

Motion by Mr. Paul H. Niles: I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the s\im of $1, 100, 000. 00 
to acquire additional land to construct and originally equip and furnish an intermediate school on land owned 
or to be acquired by the Town in North Wilmington and to meet said appropriation that the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, be and is hereby authorized to borrow a sum or sums not to exceed 
$1, 100,000.00 under authority of Chapter 645, Acts of 1948, as amended, and to issue bonds or notes there- 
for payable in not more than 20 years and that the Permanent Building Committee be and hereby is authorize( 
to enter into contracts and to do all things that are necessary for constructing, originally equipping and 
furnishing said intermediate school. 

Motion to amend by Mr. Michelson: To reduce the amount to be appropriated from $1, 100, 000. 00 to 
$1, 050, 000. 00 was voted by a standing vote. Yes - 270, No - 198. After a lengthy discussion during which 
Mr. Shea, the new Superintendent of Schools was permitted to speak the question was called for. By standing 
vote on the main motion as amended Yes - 523, No - 0. Motion adopted by unanimous approval. | 

Article 5: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to enter into and fully perform on behalf 
of the Town an agreement with Robert G. and Bernice A. Cowie providing as follows: 

1. That Robert G. and Bernice A. Cowie will convey to the Town a parcel of land owned by 
them on Ballardvale Street described as follows: 

A parcel of land bounded easterly by Ballardvale Street - 75 ft. , southerly by land of the Town 
of Wilmington - 150 ft. , westerly by land now or formerly of Signore - 75 ft. , and northerly 
by said last mentioned land - 150 ft. Being the same premises conveyed to Robert G. and 
Bernice A. Cowie by Samuel S. Thorpe and wife by deed recorded with Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds, Book 1317, Page 395. There shall be excluded however from 
said conveyance all buildings now on said property. 

2. That as the sole and full consideration for such conveyance, the Town will convey to said 

Robert G. and Bernice A. Cowie a parcel of land on said Ballardvale Street owned by it and k 
described as follows: I 

Beginning at an iron pipe inside the stone wall at the northwest corner of lot near land of I 
Frank J. Melanson, thence running along Ballardvale Street S 15°- 35' E, 125. 00 feet; thence I 
S 67° 05' W 181. 50 feet by land of the Town of Wilmington; thence N 15° 35' W, 125. 00 feet I 

114 

I 




by land of Frank J. Melanson to the point of beginning, containing 2Z, 500 square feet and further will 
pay all expenses required to move the buildings now located on said first mentioned parcel to said 
second parcel, to provide a proper foundation for said buildings on said location, and also to provide 
such plumbing, heating and other service connections as may reasonably be required to render said 
buildings available for use as at present, other details of such agreement to be at the discretion of the 
Selectmen. 

The object of such agreement being to provide further land for the location of the school provided for 
under the previous article, any funds necessary for its performance to be supplied from the funds 
appropriated under said previous article. 

or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee approved. 
Upon a motion by Mr. DeFelice the above article was voted by voice unanimously and so declared by the 
Moderator . 

Article 6: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-laws and Zoning Map by changing from 
Single Residence A to General Business District the following described parcel of land: 



A certain parcel of land in the easterly part of Wilmington at the corner of Lowell and West Streets and 
bordering Route 93. This parcel is more specifically described as starting at a point on the easterly side of 
West Street; thence running northerly along West Street five hundred sixty-five (565) feet; thence turning and 
rvmning in an easterly direction one thousand one hundred eighty (1, 180) feet; thence turning southerly by two 
courses eight hundred (800) feet; thence turning and running westerly by three courses one thousand one 
hundred fifty-two (1, 152) feet to a point of beginning, containing approximately seventeen (17) acres; said 
parcel being so much of the second and third parcels described in the deed of David H. Boyce to Hannah M. 
Hull, dated March 5, 1867 and recorded with the Middlesex North Registry District Book 55, Page 47, and 
of the parcel described in the deed of Arthur G. Bancroft to Mary E. Carter dated July 18, 1907 and recorded 
with said deeds Book 407, Page 224, as was not conveyed by said Mary E. Carter or taken from her or her 
heirs by deed or instruments recorded in said deeds in Book 407, Page 225, Book 540, Page 575, Book 663 
Page 56, Book 710 Page 504, Book 723 Page 220, Book 773 Page 42, and Book 1374 Page 43. 

or do anything in relation thereto. Request of John Elia and others. Finance Committee - Planning Board 
action approved. Mr. Michael J. Elia moved the adoption of the above article. 

Mr. Beers read a report from the Planning Board outlining the reasons the board approved the proposal and 
urging the Town to vote in favor of this article. Report filed with Town Clerk. After a lengthy discussion 
the question was called for. Voted to close debate - Yes, 471, No - 20. Mr. Cutter read the Main motion 
and the motion was lost - Yes 279, No 274. A two-thirds vote was required. 

Article 7 : To see if the Town will vote to repeal the present building by-laws of the Town and adopt instead 
thereof the proposed new building by-laws as set forth in the report of the building by-law committee, a 
copy of which report is annexed to this warrant, and copies of which are also on file and available for in- 
spection in the office of the Town Clerk, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Building By-law 
iCommittee. 



Mr. DeFelice moved that the meeting adjourn to one week from tonight at 8. 00 P. M. in this hall at which 
time Article #7 would be taken up for action thereon. Mr. Belbin moved that the motion be amended to 
read that the meeting adjourn to the 3rd Monday in January. Voice vote was taken and the moderator 
ieclared it a vote. Seven people rose to question the vote. Standing vote then taken on the amendment. 
fes - 106, No - 128. Motion to amend Lost. Vote on the Main motion declared unanimous. 

Vleeting declared adjourned at 11. 00 P. M. Six hundred and twenty-seven (627) voters were checked on the 
noting list. 



^ true copy: 
\ttest: 



(Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



115 



ADJOURNED SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - December 5, I960 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



Called in accordance with the motion to adjourn in the Special Town Meeting of November 28, I960. 

At 8.25 P.M. there were one hundred thirteen ( 11 3) voters present. Mr. Cutter, moderator, informed 
those present that they could wait for a quorum (one hundred fifty voters) or move to adjourn. 

Motion: To postpone until next Annual Town Meeting. 

Mr. Cutter explained that this meant that this article would have to be the first article in the Warrant. 
Mr. DeFelice said that this probably would carry the meeting into three days. 
Motion was withdrawn. 

Several other motions were made but the moderator said they were not in order; only a motion to adjourn 
could be voted on without a quorum. 

Motion to adjourn indefinitely was offered. Motion to amend by striking out the word indefinitely LOST 

by a voice vote. Main motion to adjourn indefinitely was voted by voice. 



Meeting adjourned at 8, 40 P. M. 

A true copy: (Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 

Attest: Town Clerk 



116 



WARRANT 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
TO: Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By- 
laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the 

HIGH SCHOOL CAFETERIA 
Saturday, the 4th Day of March, A. D. 1961 

at 9- 45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10. 00 A. M. and shall be closed at 8. 00 P. M. , for 
the election of Town Offices: 

ARTICLE 1: One Selectmen for the term of three years; One Selectman for the term of one year (to fill 
an unexpired term); Two Members of the School Committee for the term of three years; One Mederator 
for the term of one year; One Member of the Wilmington Housing Authority for the term of five years; One 
Member of the Wilmington Housing Authority for the term of two years (to fill an unexpired term). 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and meet 
in Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasivim, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington 

on 

Saturday, the Uth Day of March, A. D. 1961 
at 1. 30 P. M. , then and there to act on the Following Articles: 
ARTICLE Z: To hear the reports of Committees and act thereon. 

ARTICLE 3: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year, beginning 
January 1, 1962 and to issue notes therefor payable within one year, all in accordance with Sections 4 and 
17, Chapter 44, of the General Laws. 

ARTICLE 4: To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and salaries 
of the several Town Offices, and Departments, and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by 
taxation, transfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 5: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the svim of One Thousand Dollars ($1000) 
for the observ^ance of Memorial Day and that the Moderator appoint a Committee who shall arrange and have 
charge of such observance, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 6: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750. 00) for the purpose of renewing \inder authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. , in Wilmington for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 7: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750. 00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing 



117 



ARTICLE 7 (continued): 

suitable headquarters for the Nee -Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 8: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money under the authority of 
Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, as amended, for the purpose of providing suitable quarters for 
the William F. Tattersall Chapter No. 106, Disabled American Veterans, located in Wilmington, Mass. , or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 9: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred Dollars ($100. 00) 
the money to be expended under the direction of the 4-H Town Committee, serving in cooperation with the 
Middlesex County Extension Service, under the provisions of Sections 40 to 45, Chapter 128, General Laws 
of Massachusetts, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 10: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purchase of two vehicles for the use of the Police Department, and authorize 
the sale or turn-in of the two present vehicles used by the Police Department, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 11: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purchase of a truck for the use of the Highway Department and authorize the 
sale or turn-in of a truck presently used by the Highway Department, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 12: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of laying, 
water mains of not less than 6 inches, but less than 16 inches in diameter on specified streets in accordance 
with the recommendations of the Board of Water Commissioners acting under the provisions of Chapter 332, • 
Acts of 1955, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of | 
Water Commissioners. i. 

ARTICLE 13: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds, and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in relatic; 
thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 14: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds a sum of 
money not to exceed Three Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($3, 500. 00) and appropriate the s\im for hot 
topping Avenues in Wildwood Cemetery as far as the money will permit, or take any action in relation theret( 
Request of the Cemetery Commissioners. 

ARTICLE 15: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available 
funds for the purchase of a lawn mower for the use of the Cemetery Department, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of the Cemetery Commissioners. 

ARTICLE 16: To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Marcia Road as approved ' 
by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the assessment of 
Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned 
is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by the 
right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the 
purpose of this article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said way and for 
the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements 
therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 



118 



ARTICLE 17: To see if the Town will vote to accept the Extension of Carson Avenue as a public town way as 
laid out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to a plan filed with the 
office of the Town Clerk, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 18: To see if the Town will vote to accept Marie Drive as a public town way as laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to a plan filed with the office of the Town 
Clerk, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 19: To see if the Town will vote to accept Thrush Road as a public town way as laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to a plan filed with the office of the Town 
Clerk, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 20: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purpose of laying a sewer main from the Woburn Street Sewer to the M. D. C. 
trunk line or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

; ARTICLE 21: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purchase of a front-end loader and back-hoe for the use of the Water Depart- 
ment, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 22: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds a sum of 
money not to exceed Three Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($3, 500. 00) and appropriate the sum for hot 
topping around the Police Station or take any action in relation thereto. Request of the Police Chief. 

'.\ ARTICLE 23: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
I funds and appropriate for the purpose of installing a drainage system on Powder House Circle, or do any- 
! thing in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. 

j ARTICLE 24: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the improvement, 
] development and maintenance of the Ipswich River (Chapter 91 Project) or take any action in relation there- 
to. Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 25: To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington by adding a 
; section as follows: "Chapter Ill-Section 22 - Whenever any Board, Commission, Committee or Town Officer 
shall officially advertise in any publication, a copy of said advertisement shall appear in a newspaper pub- 
lished and sold in the Town of Wilmington, if any, otherwise in a newspaper published and sold in the County 
of Middlesex. " Request of Larz Neilson and others. 

ARTICLE 26: To see if the Town will vote to establish an additional voting precinct within the Town of 
Wilmington, bounded and described as follows: Beginning at the junction of the Wilmington, Tewksbury and 
I Billerica Town lines, southerly by the Billerica line to Aldrich Road; easterly from the Billerica line, 
including both sides of Aldrich Road, to Shawsheen Avenue; thence southeasterly on Shawsheen Avenue, in- 
cluding both sides of the avenue, to Bridge Lane; thence easterly on Bridge Lane, including both sides of 
the lane, across Main Street to the junction of Glen Road and the so-called "Wildcat" railroad tracks; north- 
easterly and parallel with the railroad tracks to the junction of the Town lines of Andover, Wilmington and 
Tewksbury, and then southwesterly along the Tweksbury line to the point of beginning, or do anything in 
relation thereto, " Request of Edward J. Sullivan and others. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant, or a certified copy thereof, with your doings thereon, 
to the Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

GIVEN UNDER OUR HANDS AND SEAL OF SAID TOWN this DAY OF FEBRUARY, A. D. ONE THOUSAND 
NINE HUNDRED AND SIXTY -ONE. 

Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington 

119 



T(D)WMI A (C (C O mi M T A miTT 
ANALYSIS OF THE CASH ACCOUNT - for the year ending December 31, I960 



RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR I960 



Balance as at January 1, I960 

Add: Cash Receipts January 1 through Decennber 31, I960 

Deduct: Cash Expenditures during year I960 
Balance On Hand as at December 31, I960 = Carried forward to 1961 



443, 778. 80 
4, 227, 954. 81 
4, 671, 733. 61 
4, 332, 992. 49 

338, 741. 12 



ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIVED 



TAXES 



Tax Collections: 

Prior years' levy: 



Current year's levy: 



Poll 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 
Poll 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 
Farm Excise 

Tax Titles Redeemed 

Payments in Lieu of Taxes 

Water Liens Added to Taxes 

Street Assessment Added to Tax Bills 

Water Assessments Added to Tax Bills 

Apportioned Street Betterments Paid in Advance 

Apportioned Water Betterments Paid in Advance 

Committed Interest - Paid in Advance 

Refund Checks Returned/Taxpayers 



144. 00 

4, 510. 57 
70, 294. 23 

5, 576. 00 
62, 894. 80 

422, 731. 15 
195. 78 



74, 948. 80 



1, 491, 397. 73 



566, 346. 53 
12, 365. 42 
66. 96 
5,710. 57 
1,968. 82 
6, 173. 88 
1, 654. 41 
2, 430. 76 
113. 66 
8. 04 



GRANTS AND GIFTS 



Federal Grants: 
Charitie s 



Aid to Dependent Children, Aid 
Aid to Dependent Children, Adm. 
Old Age Assistance, Assist. 
Old Age Assistance, Admin. 
Disability Assistance, Assist. 
Disability Assistance , Admin. 
Schools 

Smith-Hughes & Geo. Barden Account 
Public Law 874 

National Defense Education Act 85/864 
Public Grants 

Construction Grants -in-Aid (Highways) 
Comm. of Mass. Chap. 81 & 90 
Middlesex County Treas. Chap. 90 



18, 193. 63 
2, 976. 91 



45, 603. 


38 


4, 645. 


57 


3, 446. 


00 


422. 


99 



21, 170. 


54 






50, 248. 


95 






3, 868. 


99 


75, 288. 


48 


137. 


00 






20, 263. 


75 






1, 301. 


37 


21, 702. 


12 


26, 666. 


07 






3, 425. 


61 


30, 091. 


68 



127, 082. 28 



120 



RECEIPTS AVAILABLE FOR APPROPRIATION 



- BUT NOT APPROPRIATED 



Repayments, Middlesex County Dog Officer 


1, 997. 


47 


Accrued Interest - Sale of Bonds 


1, 142. 


75 


Prennium Sale of Bonds 


3, 008. 


00 


Water Guaranteed Deposits 


24, 552. 


20 


Refunds from Appropriation 


1,933. 


10 


Recoveries O. A. A. Lien Law 


1, 661. 


46 


Water Department: 






Water Rates 


107, 664. 


54 


Water Services 


10, 201. 


60 


Water Betterments 


2, 585. 


80 



AMOUNTS BORROWED 



Short Term: 

To pay expenditures of Town Depts. until taxes 

are collected 
To carry on Chap. 81 & 90 work until State & 

County reimbursements are received 
Temporary Loans in Anticipation of Serial Issue 
Long Term: 

Proceeds from sale of bonds - 

Boutwell Street School Bonds 

Street Betterment Bonds 



780, 000. 00 

38, 700. 00 
200, 000. 00 



AGENCY AND TRUST FUNDS 



Federal Withholding Taxes Deducted 
State Withholding Taxes Deducted 
Retirement System Deductions 
Blue Cross/Shield Deductions 
Group Life Insurance Deductions 
U. S. Savings Bonds Deducted 

Dog Licenses, Collected for Middlesex Cty. Dog Officer 
Fish & Game Licenses, Collected for Dept. of Conservation 
Cemetery Trust Funds 



1, 018, 700. 00 



400, 000. 00 
13, 000. 00 



158, 440. 81 
11, 804. 71 
26, 299. 27 
10, 682. 85 
3, 762. 04 
337. 50 
2, 437. 25 
2, 342. 50 
400. 00 



1, 431, 700. 00 



'f. 

,11 

\u 

•I 



216, 506. 93 



RECEIPTS RESERVED FOR APPROPRIATION - RESTRICTED USES 



Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 

Refunds from Previous Years' Appropriations 



REVOLVING FUNDS 



School Lunch Program 

High School Athletic Association 

East Wilmington Improvement Association/Library Fund 



3, 115. 00 
278. 61 



94, 371. 43 
5, 781. 50 



3, 393. 61 



100, 152. 93 
3, 820. 00 



121 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



Income Taxes: 

Schools G/L Chap. 70 

Income State Allocation 
Corporation Taxes 
Motor Vehicle Excise Collections: 

Prior Years' Levy 

Current Year's Levy 
Licenses, Liquor 
Interest and Costs: 

Tax Titles Redeemed 

Tax Collections 

Accrued Interest/Street Loans 
General Government: 

Selectmen's Receipts 

Town Collector's Receipts, Miscellaneous 

Town Clerk's Receipts 

Planning Board 
Protection of Persons and Property: 

Building Inspector: 

Building Permits 
Plumbing Permits 
Wire Permits 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Police Department 
Public Works: 

Town Engineer 

Snow & Ice Removal/State 

Highway Miscellaneous 

Cemetery Department 
Board of Health: 

Sanitarian's Licenses & Permits 

Public Health Nurse's Receipts 

Clinic s 

Charities & Soldiers Benefits: 

General Relief 

Disability Assistance 

Old Age Assistance 

Aid to Dependent Children 

Veterans Benefits 

Welfare Dept. /Office Space Rent 

Disability Assist. Admin. /State Treas. Reimb. 
Schools & Libraries: 

School Construction Reimbursements 

School Transportation Reimbursements 

Vocational Training Reimbursements/State 

Miscellaneous High School Receipts 

Adult Evening School Tuition 

Division of Child Guardianship 

Public Library Receipts 
Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Meal Tax/State Treasurer 

4th District Court Fines 

Insurance Dividends & Reimbursements 

Various Miscellaneous Receipts 

State Withholding Tax Earnings, Employer 

Legal Settlements 

Sewer Mains Reimbursements 



1,118. 00 
956. 00 
1, 830. 85 



2, 053. 52 
6, 687. 58 
37, 877. 71 
9, 441. 26 



43, 769. 10 
1 15, 758. 26 



1,410. 28 
5, 371. 33 
18. 33 

743. 61 
1, 357. 25 
3, 006. 67 
27. 50 



3,904. 85 
123. 25 
268. 00 



56, 060. 07 
8,713. 26 
369. 66 
1, 676. 44 

52, 191. 34 
26, 782. 50 

3, 814. 60 
867. 42 

2, 612. 80 
29, 334. 13 



2, 734. 03 
90. 00 
2, 695. 80 
7, 408. 90 
89. 17 
632. 97 
27, 504. 00 



145, 392. 63 
18, 824. 09 
22, 005. 95 



159, 527. 36 
4, 000. 00 



6, 799. 94 



5, 135. 03 



4, 296. 10 



39. 


00 




1 


126. 


25 






305. 


00 






3, 709. 


50 


4, 179. 


75 


816. 


00 






420. 


00 






1, 825. 


25 


3, 061. 


25 



66, 819. 43 



115. 602. 79 
913. 90 



41, 154. 87 
4,227,954. 81 



122 




ANALYSIS OF THE MATURING DEBT 



INSIDE DEBT LIMIT: 

High School Loan Act 321/47 

$265, 000. 00 
Elementary School Loan, Wildwood 

School, G. L. Sec. 10 Chap. 44 

$512, 000. 00 
Fire /Police Station Loan 

G. L. Sec. 10 Chap. 44 

$60, 000. 00 
Public Sewer Mains, G. L. Sec. 10 

Chap. 44, $106, 000. 00 
Street Const. Bonds (1956) G. L. 

Sec. 10 Chap. 44, $30,000.00 
Street Const. Bonds (1958) G. L. 

Sec. 10 Chap. 44, ($60,000 
Street Const. Loan (I960) G. L. 

Sec. 10 Chap. 44, $13, 000 
Public Works Bldg. & Police Sta. 

Bonds, G. L. Sec. 10 Chap. 44 

$140, 000. 00 



OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT: 



High School Loan, Acts 321/47 

$200, 000 
Addition & Alteration Jr. /Sr. 

High School Acts 645/48 

$1, 375, 000 
Addition & Alteration Jr. /Sr. 

High School Acts 645/48 

$400, 000.00 
Glen Road School Bonds 

Acts 645/48 - $450,000.00 
Boutwell St. School Acts 645/48 

$400, 000. 00 
First Water Main Extension 

Sec. 8 Chap. 44, $75,000.00 
Water Bonds, New Well Field 

Sec. 8 Chap. 44, $60,000.00 
Water Meters, Improving Existing 

System & Betterments, Sec. 8 

Chap. 44, $145, 000 
Water Standpipe Bonds Sec. 8 

Chap. 44, $152, 000. 00 
Water Main Bonds (1957) Sec. 8 

Chap. 44, $35, 000. 00 
Water Main Bonds (1958) Sec. 8 

Chap. 44, $50,000.00 



COMBINED TOTALS 



Balance s 
as at 
1/1/60 

$ 130,000 



350, 000 



30, 000 



91, 000 



14, 000 



54, 000 



140, 000 
809, 000 



110, 000 



1,115, 000 



380, 000 



425, 000 



10, 000 
35, 000 

107, 000 

140, 000 

30, 000 

46, 000 
2, 398, 000 

$3, 207, 000 



Added 
during 
I960 



13, 000 



13, 000 



400, 000 



400. 000 



$413, 000 



Paid off 
during 
1960 

$15, 000 



25, 000 

5, 000 
15, 000 

7, 000 

6, 000 

14, 000 
87, 000 

10, 000 

80, 000 

20, 000 
■ 25,000 

5, 000 
5, 000 

18, 000 

10, 000 

5, 000 

4, OOP 
182, 000 

$269, 000 



Balance s 

as at 
12/31/60 

$ 115,000 



325, 000 

25, 000 
76, 000 
7, 000 
48, 000 
13, 000 

126, 000 
735, 000 

100, 000 

1, 035, 000 

360, 000 
400, 000 
400, 000 
5, 000 
30, 000 

89, 000 

130, 000 

25, 000 

42, 000 
2, 616, 000 

$3, 351, 000 



>> 
u 

(9 
k. 

n 

'■'» 

(1) 

is! 

■i 



123 



SCHEDULE OF SHORT TERM LOANS 



Temporary Loans in Anticipation 
of Tax Collections 



Balance 
as at 
1/1/60 



Added 
during 
1960 

780, 000. 00 



Paid off 
during 
I960 

780, 000. 00 



Balances 

as at 
12/31/60 



Temporary Loans in Anticipation 
of Reimbursement (Highways) 



25, 525. 00 



38, 000. 00 



25,525.00 38,000.00 



Temporary Loans in Anticipation 
of Serial Issues/Bonds 



200, 000. 00 



200, 000. 00 



TOTALS 



25, 525. 00 



1,018,000.00 1,005,525.00 38,000.00 



COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
USED BY THE ASSESSORS IN SETTING THE I960 TAX RATE 
WITH THE ACTUAL RECEIPTS OF THE YEAR - 12/31/60 





Used by the 


Actual 


Receipts 




Assessors on 


I960 




more than 




the I960 Rate 


Receipts 


Estimated 


Income Tax 


155, 531. 


48 


164, 216. 


72 


8, 685. 24 


Corporation Tax 


18, 655. 


95 


22, 005. 


95 


3, 350. 00 


Reimbursements Publicly Owned Land 


66. 


96 


66. 


96 




Old Age Tax (Meals) 


2. 726. 


58 


2, 734. 


03 


7. 45 


Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 


136, 342. 


87 


152, 637. 


06 


16, 294. 19 


Licenses 


4, 000. 


00 


4, 000. 


00 




Special Assessments 


3. 300. 


00 


3, 638. 


18 


338. 18 


General Government 


5, 090. 


00 


5, 135. 


03 


45. 03 


Protection of Persons & Property 


5,217. 


00 


4,296. 


10 




Health & Sanitation 


2, 070. 


00 


3, 061. 


25 


991. 25 


Charities (Other than Grants) 


16, 878. 


00 


19, 858. 


80 


2, 980. 80 


Old Age Assistance (Other than 












Federal Grants) 


39. 509. 


00 


37, 877. 


71 




Veterans Services 


8, 460. 


00 


8, 713. 


26 


253. 26 


Schools (Income Tax not to be included) 


45, 185. 


00 


63, 411. 


45 


18, 226. 45 


Libraries 


653. 


00 


913. 


90 


260. 90 


Cemeteries 


3,219. 


00 


3,709. 


50 


490. 50 


Interests 


5, 632. 


00 


6, 799. 


94 


1, 167. 94 


State Assistance/School Construction Proj 


77, 176. 


49 


52, 191. 


34 




Farm Animal Excise Tax 


240. 


00 


195. 


78 




Unclassified 


2, 282. 


00 


7, 625. 


90 


5, 343. 90 


Sewer Bonds & Interest Reimb. 


27, 504. 


00 


27, 504. 


00 




TOTALS 


559, 739. 


33 


592.595. 


52 


58,435. 09 



Receipts 
less than 
Estimated 



920. 90 



1, 631. 29 



24, 985. 151 
44. 221 



27, 581. 56 



124 



ANALYSIS OF FEDERAL GRANTS 



Charities: 

Aid to Dependent Children, Aid 
Aid to Dependent Children, Admin. 



Balances 
as at 
1/1/60 

3, 141. 21 
244. 50 
3, 385. 71 



Grants 
Received 
in I960 

18, 193. 63 
2, 976. 91 
21, 170. 54 



Expenditures 
during 
1960 

10, 523. 37 
2, 939. 36 
13, 462. 73 



Balances 

as at 
12/31/60 

10, 811. 47 
282. 05 
11, 093. 52 



Old Age Assistance, Aid 


4, 696. 


42 


50, 052. 75 


53, 043. 


27 


1, 705. 


90 


Old Age Assistance, Admin. 


6, 004. 


81 


4, 645. 57 


5, 456. 


05 


5, 194. 


33 




10, 701. 


23 


54, 698. 32 


58, 499. 


32 


6, 900. 


23 


Disability Assistance, Aid 


-1, 880. 


13 


3, 446. 00 


2, 090. 


55 


- 524. 


68 


Disability Assistance, Admin. 


136. 


36 


422. 99 






559. 


35 




-1, 743. 


77 


3, 868. 99 


2, 090. 


55 


34. 


67 




12, 343. 


17 


79, 737. 85 


74, 052. 


60 


18, 028. 


42 



Schools: 



Smith-Hughes, George Bar den Fund 

Special School Acct. P/L #874 

National Defense Education P/L #85/864 



356. 09 
11, 431. 25 
3, 920. 90 
15, 708. 24 



137. 00 
20, 263. 75 
1, 301. 37 
21, 702. 12 



356. 09 
26, 856. 62 
4, 748. 46 
31,961. 17 



ANALYSIS OF THE BORROWING CAPACITY 
Town of Wilmington, Mass. - Year I960 

(BORROWING CAPACITY (Chapter 44, Sec. 10 G/L) 



137. 00 
4, 838. 38 

473. 81 
5, 449. 19 









Net 




Valuations 


Abatements 


Valuations 


:1960 Property Valuations 


25, 377, 090 


968, 263 


24, 408, 827 


i960 Motor Vehicle Excise 


2, 565, 620 


149, 460 


2, 416, 160 


1959 Property Valuations 


23, 871, 152 


759, 409 


23, 111, 743 


1959 Motor Vehicle Excise 


2, 188, 550 


108, 450 


2, 080, 100 


1958 Property Valuations 


19, 246, 445 


777, 347 


18, 469. 098 


1958 Motor Vehicle Excise 


2, 450, 391 


250, 064 


2, 200, 327 




75, 699. 248 


3, 012,993 


72, 686, 255 


Average Valuations (3 years) 




24, 228, 753 




5% Legal Borrowing Capacity 




1,211,438 





,11 
I 



FUNDED DEBT 



General, Inside Debt Limit 735,000 
General, Outside Debt Limit 2,295,000 
Enterprise, Water, G/L 321, 000 

3, 351, 000 



AVAILABLE BORROWING CAPACITY 1/1/61 $476,438 
Requirement Chapter 44, Sec. 7 (25^ - $1,000 Valuation) $6,344.27 



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nj HI 



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m H H 



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01 4) U 

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DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES OTHER THAN THAT RAISED FROM 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE YEAR ENDING 12/31/60 



REFUNDS: 
Taxes 

Prior Years 
Current Levy 
Poll Tax 
Real Estate 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 
Prior Years 
Current Levy 
Water Liens I960 
Street Assessments Added to Taxes 
Water Assessments Added to Taxes 
Water Assessments Paid in Advance 
Street Assessments Paid in Advance 
Water Rates 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 

Interest & Costs - Tax Collection & Tax Titles 

Redeemed 
Building Inspector Fees 
Sanitary Inspector Fees 
Town Clerk 
Tax Title 

Cemetery Dept. Receipts 
Total Refunds Paid: 



867. 01 

12. 00 
8, 290. 57 



1,992 
4, 898 



28 
02 



00 
40 



9, 169. 58 



6, 890. 30 
18. 50 
. 54 
26. 55 

4. 40 



16. 109. 87 
139. 15 
5,859. 30 

14. 82 
5. 00 
5. 00 
1. 00 

38. 51 
50. 00 
22, 222. 65 



Petty Cash Advances 

Legal Settlements Paid 

State & County Assessments. 
County Hospital Assessment 2, 921. 26 

County Tax Assessment 18,950.18 
County Retirement Assessment 19, 485. 30 

State Parks Assessment 3,972. 69 

State Audit Assessment 120. 16 

Agency &t Trust Funds : 
Carter Lecture Fund 
BlueCross /Shield 
Withholding Deductions, Federal 
Withholding Deductions, State 
Retirement System Deductions 
Group Insurance Deductions 
Dog Licenses Collected for County 
Fish & Game Licenses Due Dept. Conservation 
Cemetery Trust Funds 
U. S. Savings Bonds 

Trust Fund/East Wilmington Improvement Assoc. 
Town F\mctions (Not Appropriated) 
Premium Sale of Bonds 
School Lunch Program 
High School Athletic Association 
Water Department Maintenance & Operation 
Water Betterments - I960 
Water Improvements 



115. 21 
9, 440. 38 



41, 356. 74 

4, 092. 85 

400. 00 
10, 682. 85 
158, 440. 81 
11, 804. 71 
26. 299. 27 
3, 824. 84 
2. 421. 50 
2, 277. 50 
400. 00 
337. 50 
3, 820. 00 

1. 250. 00 
92. 294. 57 
3, 188. 72 
105, 296. 43 
5,463. 83 
38, 527. II 



45, 449. 59 



220. 708. 98 



130 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS (Continued) 



Town Functions (Not appropriated) 
Street Betterments - I960 

Additions & Alterations Jr. /Sr. High School 
Construction Glen Road School 
Construction Boutwell St. School 
Plans & Preparation Intermediate School 
Municipal Garage 
Police Station Construction 
Federal Grants & Aid 
George Barden Fiand 
P. L. 85/864 

P. L. 874 - Federal Aid to Schools 

Aid to Dependent Child. Aid 

Aid to Dependent Child, Admin. 

Old Age Assist. Assistance 

Old Age Assist. Administration 

Disability Assistance, Aid 
Temporary Loans 

Anticipation of Revenue /Taxe s 

Anticipation of Serial Issue Loans 

Anticipation of Reimbursement /Highway 
Land Court Entry Fee - Tax Title Takings 



TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL LEDGER ACCOUNTS 



356. 09 
4, 748. 46 
26, 856. 62 
10, 523. 37 
2. 939. 36 
53, 043. 27 
5, 329. 78 



10, 272. 04 
9, 036. 20 

61, 71 1. 17 
348, 820. 23 
7, 500. 00 

39, 499. 96 

57, 362. 88 



31, 961. 17 

13, 462. 73 

58,373. 05 
2, 090. 55 

780, 000. 00 
200, 000. 00 
25, 525. 00 



780, 223. 12 



105, 887. 50 



1, 005, 525. 00 
3. 50 

2, 189, 575. 95 



TRUST FUND ACCOUNTS - Year Ending 12/31/60 



Cemetery Trust Funds: 

Woburn Five Cent Savings Bank 
Andover Savings Bank 
Mechanics Savings Bank 



On Hand 
1/1/60 

516. 92 
2, 537. 81 
18. 714. 43 



Trusts 
Added 
1960 



400. 00 



Interest 
Received 
I960 

17. 51 
89. 30 
459. 80 



Balance 
on Hand 
12/31/60 

534. 43 
2, 627. 11 
19, 574. 23 



S. D. A. Carter Lecture Fvmd: 
Woburn Five Cent Savings Bank 
Mechanics Savings Bank 



2, 676. 06 
5, 109. 75 



91. 07 
125.21 



2, 767. 13 
5. 234. 96 



Burnap Library Fund: 
Andover Savings Bank 



268. 54 



9. 47 



278. 01 



Benjamin Buck Library Fund : 
Andover Savings Bank 



669. 55 



23. 63 



693. 18 



Charlotte C. Smith Library Fund: 
Mechanics Savings Bank 



750. 93 



18. 39 



769. 32 



Sears, Cook, Walker-Walker School 

Library Fund: 

Mechanics Savings Bank 



296. 68 



7. 27 



303. 95 



Chester M. Clark Library Fund 
Mechanics Savings Bank 



1, 004. 32 



24. 61 



1, 028. 93 



Sabra Carter Common Fund 
Andover Savings Bank 



282. 87 



9. 96 



292. 83 



East Wilmington Improvement 

Association Library Fund 

Mechanics Savings Bank 



32, 827. 86 



3, 820. 00 
4, 220. 00 



876. 22 



3, 820. 00 
37, 924. 08 



131 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, I960 

ASSETS 



Cash 

Petty Cash Advances 
Taxes: 

Prior Levies: 
Poll Taxes 1957 
1958 
1959 

Personal Property Tax 
Real Estate Taxes 



338, 741. 12 
305. 00 



1958 
1959 
1955 
1956 
1959 



Current Levy: 
Poll Taxes 

Personal Property Taxes 
Real Estate Taxes 

Farm Animal Excise I960 

Motor Vehicle Excise: Prior Levy 

Motor Vehicle Excise: Current 
Special Assessments: Prior Levy 

Water Assess, added to taxes, 1959 

St. Assess, added to taxes, 1959 

Comm. Water Interest, 1959 

Comm. Street Interest, 1959 
Special Assessments: Current Levy 

Water Assess, added to taxes, I960 

St. Assess, added to taxes, 1960 

Comm. Water Interest, I960 

Comm. Street Interest, I960 
Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions 
Water Liens 1959 
Water Liens I960 

Unapportioned Water Assessments 
Water Rates 
Water Services 

Charities & Soldiers Benefits A/R 
General Relief 
Aid to Dependent Children 
Old Age Assistance 
Aid to Highways /State & County A/R 
County Aid to Highways 
State Aid to Highways 
Unprovided/Overdrawn Accounts: 
Overlay 1956 
1958 
1959 
I960 

Legal Settlements Paid 

Overdrafts I960 Appropriations: 

Elections Account 

Fire Dept. Salaries 

Snow & Ice Removal 

Garbage Collections 

Veteran's Benefits 

Bonds & Insurance 

Interest Account 
County Tax Assess. 1960/Under Estimate 
State Parks & Reserv. Assess. 1960/Unde 
Due from Carter Lecture Fund Account 
Disability Assistance/Aid - Federal 

TOTAL ASSETS 



8. 


00 






42. 


00 






64. 


00 


114. 


00 


74. 


25 






678. 


40 


752. 


65 


2. 


80 






102. 


95 






17, 076. 


88 


17, 182. 


63 


234. 


00 






5, 126. 


00 






70, 661. 


30 


76, 021. 


30 






57 


01 


6, 344. 


65 






44, 782. 


38 


51, 127 


03 


151. 


41 






31 


64 






200 


68 






24. 08 


407 


81 


1, 078 


61 






136. 06 






786 


36 






97 


93 


2, 098 


96 



Est. 



14. 50 
495. 35 
2, 423. 62 
19, 917. 79 



598. 75 

1, 727. 96 

2, 100. 63 
116. 72 

8, 797. 82 
290. 91 
1,136. 68 



36, 682. 31 
20, 353. 33 
228. 04 
821. 27 

20, 983. 00 
2, 377. 71 



147, 761. 39 

57, 035. 64 

1, 049. 31 
3, 500. 41 

23, 360. 71 



132 



2, 681. 


05 




3, 266. 


79 




2, 142. 


90 


8, 080. 74 


7, 250. 


00 




30, 860. 


35 


38, 110. 35 






22, 851. 26 


9, 440. 


38 




14, 769. 


47 




1, 234. 


20 




855. 


72 




746. 


00 




524. 


68 


27. 570.45 






668, 376. 38 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31. I960 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Temporary Loans /Anticipation of Reimbursement 

Sale of Real Estate Fund 

Premium Sale of Bonds 

Accrued Interest Sale of Bonds 

Water Available Surplus 

Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 

Road Machinery Fund 

School Lunch Program 

High School Athletic Association 

Federal Grants/Schools: 

Smith Hughes-George Harden Fund 137. 00 

Public Law #874 4,838.38 

Public Law #85-864 473. 81 

Federal Grants/Chairities: 

Aid to Dependent Children - Aid 10, 81 1. 47 

Admin. 282. 05 

Old Age Assistance - Assistance 1, 705. 90 

Administration 5, 194. 33 

Disability Assistance - Administration 
Tax Possessions - Duplicate Sales 
Redemption of Assigned Tax Titles 
Tailings /Unclaimed Checks 
Recoveries - Aid to Dependent Children and 

Old Age Assistance 
Agency Accounts: 

Group Life Insurance Account 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 

Dog License Due County 

Fish & Game Licenses Due Dept. Conservation 
Reserve Fund-Overlay Surplus 
Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 
Reserved Until Collected, Revenue: 

Motor Vehicle Excise Revenue 

Tax Title Revenue 

Departmental Revenue (Charities & Vet. Benefits) 
Water Revenue 

Farm Animal Excise Revenue 
Special Assessments Revenue 
Appropriation Accounts - Revenue General: 
Encumberance s carried to 1961 
Planning Board 
Fire Alarm Extension 
Fire Station Maintenance 
Civil Defense 

Chapter 90 Construction, I960 
Construct Carolyn Road 
Relocate Boutwell Street 
Hobson Avenue Drainage 
Install Traffic Control Light 
Inventory Town Owned Equipment 
Construct Dog Pound 
Appropriation Accounts - Non Revenue: 
Street Betterments, 1960 
Water Betterments, I960 
Water Development 

Water Improvements/Barrows Well Field 
Boutwell Street School 

Additions & Alterations Jr. /Sr. High School 
Construct Athletic Field 
Construct Glen Road School 
Construct Wildwood St. School 
Construct Municipal Garage 
Construct Fire/Police Building 
Construct New Police Building 
Surplus Revenue 



5, 449. 19 



1 1, 093. 52 

6, 900. 23 
559. 35 



1, 288. 90 
770. 62 
54. 50 
65. 00 



51, 127. 03 
57, 035. 64 

8, 090. 74 
24, 410. 02 
57. 01 

6, 007. 18 



7, 629. 


92 


1, 600. 


00 


352 


12 


240 


00 


1, 545 


48 


2, 965 


76 


3, 803 


69 


25, 000 


00 


8, 000 


00 


2, 882 


00 


387 


00 


3, 000 


00 


2, 727. 


96 


1, 758. 


73 


13, 054. 


89 


3, 326. 


82 


51, 154. 


77 


14, 897. 


51 


4, 036. 


61 


5, 165. 


05 


5,299. 


55 


318. 


73 


300. 


18 


129. 


83 



38, 700. 00 
8, 620. 00 
1, 758. 00 

1, 136. 68 
65, 264. 55 

3. 775. 00 
180. 25 

2, 297. 39 

3, 450. 84 



24, 002. 29 
201. 74 
51.81 
514. 94 

2, 242. 64 



179. 02 
32. 02 
305. 00 



146, 727. 62 



57, 405. 97 



102, 152. 63 
207, 377. 99 



TOTAL LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



668, 376. 38 



133 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING I960 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 



Selectmen, Board of: 






Town Accountant (continued) 




Salary, Clerk 


600. 


00 


Due s 


7. 00 


Rent & Town Mtg. Expenses 


443. 


85 


Travel Allowances 


25. 00 


Dues & Subscriptions 


50. 


00 


Repairs, Office Equipment 


62. 65 


Printing & Advertising 


215. 


15 


Supplies, Office 


51. 11 


Binding 


7. 


00 


Supplies, Library 


7. 50 


Legal Fees 


726. 


01 




7, 097. 01 


Travel Allowances 


447. 


16 


Town Treasurer: 




Supplies, Office 


55. 


04 


Salary, Administrative 


4, 689. 88 




2, 544. 


21 


Salary, Clerical 


99. 25 


Elections: 






Due s 


8. 00 


Wages, Workers 


2, 084. 


15 


Legal Fees 


59. 29 


Printing 


107. 


00 


Recording Fees 


54. 00 


Meals, Workers 


105. 


21 


Repairs, Office Equipment 


25. 50 


Supplies, Department 


542. 


95 


Supplies, Office 


447. 07 




2, 839. 


31 




5. 382. 99 


Registrar of Voters: 






Town Collector: 




Salaries, Registrars 


600. 


00 


Salary, Administrative 


4, 888. 00 


Salaries, Clerk 


200. 


00 


Services, Deputy Collector 


100. 00 


Salaries, Clerical 


34. 


00 


Due s 


8. 00 


Printing 


690. 


55 


Binding 


38. 00 


Services, Census 


1, 430. 


45 


Advertising 


246. 50 


Supplies, Office 


7. 


25 


Recording Fees 


438. 60 




2, 962. 


25 


Supplies, Office 


699. 02 


Finance Committee: 








6, 418. 42 


Services, Clerical 


25. 


00 


Town Clerk: 




Printing 


304. 


25 


Salary, Administrative 


4, 212. GO 


Advertising 


11. 


75 


Due s 


7. 50 


Postage 


52. 


00 


Binding 


23. 26 




392. 


75 


Postage 


3. 80 


Town Manager: 






Suppli e s , Of f i c e 


104. 24 


Salary, Administrative 


9, 240. 


00 


Outlay, Vaxolt 


202. 95 


Salary, Secretary 


4, 160. 


00 




4, 553.75 


Dues & Subscriptions 


110. 


60 


Assessors: 




Printing & Advertising 


68. 


21 


Salary, Administrative 


5, 304. 00 


Travel Allowances 


300. 


00 


Salary, Office 


4, 623. 00 


Supplies, Office 


233. 


53 


Dues & Subscriptions 


57. 00 


Supplies, Library 


52. 


50 


Binding 


66. 00 




14, 164. 84 


Recording Fees 


16. 8C 


Industrial Account: 






Travel Allowances 


658. 56 


Due s 


7. 


50 


Repairs, Office Equipment 


18. 45 


Printing 


198. 


82 


Supplies, Office 


365. 37 


Advertising 


34. 


83 




11, 109. 18 


Travel Allowances 


300. 


00 


Town Counsel: 




Contractual Services 


26. 


50 


Retainer 


2, 000. OC 


Supplies, Office 


1. 


34 


Legal Fees 


2, 328. 75 




568. 


99 


Recording Fees & Costs 


875. 91 


Town Accountant: 






Supplies, Office 


50. OC 


Salary, Administrative 


5, 980. 


00 




5, 254. 66 


Salary, Clerical 


963. 


75 







134 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING I960 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



Town Hall: 






Salaries, Office 


6, 168 


84 


Salaries, Janitor 


1, 842. 


00 


Postage 


1, 661. 


56 


Electricity 


702. 


84 


T elephone 


1 , 839. 


70 


Water 


2 1 


00 


Repairs, Office Equipment 


619, 


89 




101. 


80 


Supplies, Office 


683. 


99 


Supplies, Fuel 


342. 


72 


Supplies, Plant 


200. 


82 


Outlay, Equipment 


473. 


35 


Outlay, Major Repairs 


240. 


00 




14, 898. 


51 


Planning Board: 






Salary, Clerical 


219. 


00 


Dues 


30. 


00 


Printing 


261. 


50 


Advertising 


210. 


00 


Recording Fees 


49. 


02 


Experts & Consultants 


1, 035. 


00 


Supplies, Office 


82. 


18 




1, 886. 


70 


PROTECTION OF PERSONS & 


PROPERTY: 





Police Department: 



Salary, 
Salary, 
Salary, 
Salary, 
Salary, 
Salary, 



Admini str ative 
Sergeants 
Patrolmen 
Vacation Help 
Traffic Supervisors 
Extra Detail 
Salary, Matrons 
Salary, Clerk 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Postage 
1 jTelephone 
('iTravel Allowance 
[irPrisoner Feeding & Meals 
(iRepairs, Radio 

Crui ser s 
Office 
Library 
Uniforms 
Rubberwear 
Department 
Gas & Oil 
Tires & Tubes 
Batterie s 
Supplies, Accessories 



Repairs, 
: -Supplie s , 
■ Supplies, 
\ (Supplies , 

iSupplies, 
11 [Supplies, 
« [Supplies, 
11 [Supplies, 
)( Supplies, 



Supplies, Medical & First Aid 



6, 500. 00 
15, 132. 00 
51, 300. 00 
4, 749. 56 
4, 980. 00 
3, 137. 82 
5. 00 
1, 590. 00 
14. 00 
53. 05 
1, 028. 75 
600. 00 
14. 55 
423. 93 
1, 417. 05 
335. 04 
42. 50 
031. 47 
50. 00 
406. 80 
868. 89 
486. 06 
7. 50 
1. 25 
16. 00 



1, 



1, 



Police Department (Continued): 
Supplies, Flashlights & Batteries 
Radio Base Station 
Outlay, New Cruisers 

Police Station Maintenance: 

Electricity 

Water 

Building Repair 
Supplies, Janitor 
Fuel, Heating 

Fire Department: 



5. 00 
388. 35 
2, 505. 25 
98, 089. 82 

154. 80 
13. 25 
363. 70 
290. 73 
163. 75 



986. 23 



Salary, Administrative 


6, 500 


00 


Salary, Lieutenants 


15, 086 


90 


Salary, Firemen 


48, 145 


00 


Salary, Vacation Help & Pd. Holidays 


5, 895 


38 


Salary, Call Firemen 


7,310 


88 


Salary, Sick Leave 


2, 059 


80 


Dues & Subscriptions 


8 


00 


Po stage 


5 


82 


Travel Allowances 


600 


00 


Meal s 


90 


05 


Repairs, Radios 


175 


87 


X\ ^ LJCi XI. O , i—/ ^ X . J — ' ^JtXX X/lll^XlX 


.259 


25 


X XX XxX CX X XIX XVX A X 1 1 X ci: X ICL 1 c 


427 


41 


X\ ^ XICLX XO, VC^ilX^^XCO 


1, 936. 


36 


tw* iXL-/L^XX^ V^^X X X \_ ^ 


34 


78 


Supplies, Uniforms 


498 


50 


Supplies, Rubberwear 


290. 


50 


Supplies, Small Tools & Equip. 


371. 


14 


Supplies, Firefighting 


282. 


47 


Supplies, Gas & Oil 


711. 


48 


Supplies, Vehicle 


180. 


04 


Care of Grounds 


5. 


99 


Supplies, Medical & First Aid 


78. 


95 


Flashlights & Batteries 


89. 


75 


Outlay, New Pickup Truck 


2, 500. 


00 


Outlay, Firefighting Equip. 


2, 463. 


72 


Fire Alarm Extension 


1, 647. 


88 




97, 655. 


92 


Ambulance: 






Wages, Drivers 


1, 186. 


77 


Laundry & Cleaning 


40. 


54 


Repairs, Vehicle 


216. 33 


Supplies, Bedding 


13. 


50 


Gas & Oil 


182. 


00 


Medical & First Aid Supplies 


15. 


00 




1, 654. 


14 


Constable: 






Service s 


100. 


00 



,0 

« I 

1!- 

l\ 



135 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING I960 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



Police/Fire Station: 






Tree Warden (Continued) 






Electricity 


754. 


50 


Repairs, Equipment 


339. 


55 


Telephone 


523. 


05 


Repairs, Vehicles 


82. 


44 


Water 


35. 


90 


Supplies, Dept. 


420. 


00 


Bottled Gas 


36. 


40 


Supplies, Trees & Shrubs 


5. 


40 


Repairs, Radio Base Station 


142. 


44 


Outlays 


7, 828. 


79 


Supplies, Janitor 


191. 


69 




14, 978. 


25 


Supplies, Fuel 


1, 494. 


41 


Dutch Elm: 






Supplies, Building 


413. 


62 


Salaries, Tree Workers 


7, 410. 


30 


Outlay, Equipment Building 


683. 


45 


Supplies, Dept. 


17. 


74 


Outlay, Major Repairs 


706. 


54 


Supplies, Chemicals 


902. 


32 




4, 982. 


00 




8, 330. 


36 


Civil Defense: 






Gypsy Moth: 






Telephone 


205. 


35 


Salaries, Tree Workers 


4, 988. 


05 


Communications 


25. 


00 


Dues & Subscriptions 


6. 


00 


Travel Allowances 


73. 


52 


Electricity 


19. 


66 


Repairs, Equipment 


16. 


40 


Supplies, Chemicals 


162. 


55 


Repairs, Vehicles 


64. 50 




5, 176. 


26 


Supplies, Department 


317. 


09 


Town Forest: 






Supplies, Dept. Training 


104. 


60 


Wage s 


244. 


20 




806. 


46 


Mosquito Control 


1, 000. 


00 


Dog Officer: 








1, 244.20 


Service s 


400. 


00 


Town Engineer: 






Travel Allowance 


360. 


00 


Salary, Administrative 


6, 999. 


72 


Housing for Animals 


360. 


00 


Wages, Engineer's Asst. 


4, 330. 


00 


Disposal of Dogs 


296. 


00 


Dues 


8. 


00 




1,416. 


00 


Blueprints 


18. 


93 


Building Inspector: 






Recording Fees 


3. 


20 


Salary, Administrative 


5, 876. 


00 


Repairs, Equipment 


29. 


35 


Services, Clerical 


72. 


00 


Supplies, Office 


306. 


38 


Electrical Fees 


1. 399. 


80 


Small Tools & Equipment 


91. 


17 


Plumbing Fees 


778. 


00 




1 1, 786. 


75 


Due s 


35. 


00 


PUBLIC WORKS: 






Printing 


24. 


00 








Travel Allowance 


489. 


50 


Street Betterments: 






Supplies, Office 


80. 


44 


Salarie s 


2, 276. 


20 




8, 754. 


74 


Eqmpment Rental 


5, 408. 


75 


Board of Appeals: 






Recordings & Contractual Services 


58. 


62 


Salary, Clerical 


64. 75 


Supplies, Construction 


2, 528. 


47 


Postage 


10. 


00 




10, 272. 


04 


Supplies, Office 


53. 


91 


Highway Department: 








128. 


66 


Salaries & Wages 


41, 790. 


29 


Sealer Weights & Measures: 






Rent, Buildings 


10. 


00 


Salary, Administrative 


460. 


24 


Rent, Trucks 


132. 


00 


Supplies, Office 


73. 


89 


Rent, Equipment 


8, 657. 


00 


Supplies, Dept. 


226. 


05 


Electricity 


125. 


50 




760. 


18 


Telephone 


180. 


05 


Tree Warden: 






Water 


20. 


49 


Salary, Administrative 


5, 616. 


00 


Supplies, Office 


185. 


00 


Due s 


8. 


00 


Weed & Brush Killer 


495. 


00 


Electricity 


14. 


12 


Rubberwear 


151. 


90 


Telephone 


106. 


35 


Fuel, Heat 


920. 


63 


Travel Allowances 


557. 


60 


Small Tools & Equipment 


2, 214. 


4< 



136 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING I960 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



Highway Department (Continued) 

Lumber 

Paints, etc. 

Hardware 

Sand, Gravel & Stone 
Patch 

Tar & Road Oils 
Culverts & Catch Basins 
Fences & Signs 
Granite Curbing 
Flashlights & Batteries 
Outlay, Mech. Equipment 

Road Machinery: 
Wages 

Repairs, Equipment 
Gas & Oil 
Tires & Tubes 
Winterizing 
Diesel Oil 

Outlay, Road Machinery 

Chapter 90 Const. 1959 : 
Salary & Wages 
Rent, Equipment 
jSupplies, Construction 

' Chapter 90 Const. I960 : 
Salary & Wages 

I Rent, Equipment 
Chapter 90 Maint. I960 : 
(Patch 

| Chapter 81 Maintenance: 

■Salaries & Wages 
^ Rent, Equipment 
' Band, Gravel & Stone 
■iPatch 
' Road Oils 

Signs & Fences 

i 

J ponstruction of Carolyn Road: 
Salaries & Wages 

1 1 

J Equipment Rental 
.•rlecording Fees 
j Sand, Gravel & Stone 
Culverts & Catch Basins 



J Public Street Lights : 

Ci. 

j mstall Traffic Control Light: 



33. 


41 


326. 


5 1 


23. 


72 


1, 555. 


05 


1, 021. 


55 


1, 653. 


69 


7, 554. 


55 


499. 


48 


3, 984. 


14 


12. 


68 


f O J U , 


? 1 


74, 383. 


29 


43. 


80 


7,977. 


96 


6, 372. 


42 


923. 


42 


54. 


50 


36. 


52 


11 048. 


90 


26, 457. 


52 


4, 906. 


89 


10, 964. 


00 


7, 125. 


46 


22, 996. 


35 


468. 


74 


2, 565. 


50 


3, 034. 


24 


4,497. 


70 


15,269. 


06 


39. 


00 


5, 476. 


29 


886. 


47 


8, 434. 


08 


1 60. 


00 


30, 264. 


90 


3.329. 


59 


4,405. 


00 


22. 


25 


425. 


80 


3,013. 


67 


11, 196 


31 


16, 082 


84 


118 


00 



Snow & Ice Removal: 
Salaries & Wages 
Rent, Equipment 
Meals, Workers 
Repairs, Equipment 
Services, Weather Control 
Small Tools & Equipment 
Salt & Sand 
Gas & Oil 
Tires & Tubes 

Parks: 



Wages, Maintenance of Grounds 
Wages, Police Duty 
Electricity 
Water 

Equipment Maintenance 
Supplies, Equipment 
Sand 

Maintenance of Grounds & Fences 
Outlay, Improvements 



Public Sewer Mains: 



Cemetery Department: 

Wage s 

Postage 

Electricity 

Telephone 

Water 

Mileage Allowance 
Repairs, Equipment 
Repairs, Vehicles 
Fuel, Heat 
Supplies, Dept. 
Construction, Supplies 
Flowers, Shrubs & Bulbs 
Fertilizers 
Gas & Oil 
Supplies, Liners 
Hot Top Avenues 



WATER DEPARTMENT: 



Water Betterments I960: 



Develop Additional Well Fields: 



11, 106. 


43 


10, 582. 


75 


178. 


95 


989. 


65 


240. 


00 


55. 


46 


4, 174. 


52 


484. 


76 


288. 


1 1 


28, 100. 


63 


888. 


80 


867. 


90 


15. 


82 


14. 


00 


50. 


38 


117. 


52 


337. 


47 


462. 


50 


1, 890. 


76 


4, 645. 


15 


7,831. 


03 


16, 072. 


90 


8. 


00 


20. 


46 


195. 


08 


74. 


61 


72. 


64 


186. 


97 


"^84 

JOT. 


■=>8 


446. 


42 


144. 


60 




1 

1 \J 


40. 


00 


375. 


00 


281. 


70 


680 


12 


3, 500 


00 


23, 396. 


24 


5, 463 


83 


38, 527 


11 



to5 
c 



137 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING I960 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



Water Maintenance: 
Tools & Equipment 
Utilities 

Pipes & Fittings 
Brass Goods 
Maintenance 
Equipnnent & Supplies 
Development 

Office Supplies &; Equipment 
Meters & Meter Parts 
Superintendent's Expenses 
System Maintenance 



HEALTH k SANITATION: 

Health &: Sanitation: 

Salary, Administration 

Salary, Clerical 

Services, Constable 

Salary, Nurse 

Salary, Substitute Nurse 

Salary, Medical Agent 

Salary, Animal Inspector 

Dues 

Printing 

Advertising 

Postage 

Recording Fees 
Mileage Allowances 
Legal Fees 
Disposal of Animals 
Expenses, Animal Inspector 
Supplies, Office 
Supplies, Chemicals 
Supplies, First Aid 
Supplies, Medical 
Health Laboratory 
Hospitalization 
Immunization Clinics 
Anti-Rabies Clinic 
Polio Clinic 



Garbage Collection: 
Town Dump: 

CHARITIES SOLDIERS BENEFITS: 
Welfare Aid: 



6, 434. 26 
4, 278. 65 
11, 487. 54 
3, 438. 89 
6, 340. 39 
3, 706. 11 
767. 86 
1, 786. 98 
5, 279. 44 
612. 31 
61, 144. 10 
105, 276. 53 



Aid to Dependent Children: 



6, 500. 


00 


683. 


25 


3. 


00 


4, 160. 


00 


140. 


00 


500. 


00 


250. 


00 


32. 


19 


69. 


00 


93. 


00 


2. 


29 


13. 


08 


1, 264. 


75 


800. 


93 


150. 


00 


50. 


00 


132. 


1 1 


5. 


78 


30. 


95 


152. 


86 


3, 948. 


90 


2, 160. 


31 


171. 


05 


387. 


75 


945. 


19 


22, 646. 


39 


9,116. 


72 


15, 500. 


00 


13, 137. 


66 


19, 972. 


60 



Old Age Assistance: 

Disability Assistance: 

Welfare Administration: 

Salar ie s 

Rent, Quarters 

Due s 

Postage 

T elephone 

Insurance, Vehicle 

Legal Fees 

Meals 

Supplies, Vehicles 
Repairs, Vehicles 
Contractual Services 
Supplies, Office 
Supplies, Department 
Outlay, Vehicle 

Veterans Benefits: 
Salary, Administrative 
Due s 
Postage 
T elephone 
Travel Allowance 
Supplies, Office 
Veterans Aid 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 
EDUCATIONAL & LIBRARY: 



45, 610. 71 
10, 785. 23 



5, 233. 


00 


270. 


15 


38. 


00 


67. 


80 


215. 


25 




72 


9. 


00 


13. 


75 


130 


80 


120 


20 


10 


00 


183 


95 


4 


34 


1, 500 


00 


7, 796 


96 



1, 040. 00 
25. 00 
20. 00 
56. 24 
178. 38 
154. 50 
27, 618. 85 
29, 092. 97 



Schools, Educational: 








Salary, Clerk 




300. 


00 


Non-salary Items 




877. 


18 


Salaries, Supt. Office 


18, 


607. 


71 


Non-salary Items, Supt. 


1, 


955. 


30 


Salaries, Child Accounting 


1, 


620. 


00 


Salaries, Direct. & Super. 


35, 


966. 


64 


Salaries, High School 


282, 


087. 


25 


H. S. Texts & Inst. Aids 


7, 


546. 


79 


H. S. Math. Supplies h. Texts 


1, 


333. 


46 


H. S. Science Supplies & Texts 




117. 


87 


H. S. Language Supplies & Texts 




415. 


44 


H. S. Stationery &; Supplies 


10. 


818. 


25 


H. S. Math. Supplies 




178. 


28 


H. S. Science Supplies 


1, 


127. 


33 


H. S. Language Supplies 


2, 


320. 


98 


H. S. Guidance Supplies 


1, 


394. 


09 


Salaries, Elementary Schools 


334, 


751. 


03 


Elem. Texts & Instruction Aids 


6, 


787. 


30 


Elem. Math. Texts 


1, 


048. 


60 



138 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING I960 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



Schools, Educational: (continued) 

Elem. Science Texts 328. 05 

Elem. Language Texts 967. 96 

Elem. Stationery & Supplies 8,794.96 

Salaries, Substitutes 9,138.50 

Salaries, Evening School 6,456.44 

Salaries, Physicians 1,500.00 

Salaries, School Nurses 7, 566. 56 

Health Supplies 410. 47 

Mental Health Clinic 750. 00 

Utilities, H. S. 6, 927. 34 

Utilities, Elementary 8,264.49 

Bus Transportation 22, 600. 00 

Taxi 1,500.50 

Athletic Transportation 1, 195. 50 

Out of State Travel 268. 00 

iUibraries 4,006.44 

Physical Education & Athletics 4, 184.97 

iSalary, Cafeteria Su pervisor 3, 500. 00 

[Cafeteria, Non Salary Items 1, 373. 61 

Special Education Tuition 1, 046. 60 

Educational T. V. 770.25 

H. S. Evaluation 572. 98 
Outlay, New Equipment 4,908.65 
■ 806, 285. 77 

Construction Boutwell Street 

School 348,845.23 

Additions & Alterations Jr. /Sr. 

riigh School Building 9,036.20 

Construction Glen Road School 61,716.17 
Preliminary Plan Prep. 

'ntermediate School 7, 500. 00 
jchool Operating Plants: 

-I. S. Janitors Salaries 24,768.50 

^.S. Wages, Extra Help 740.00 

^.S. Repairs, Building 2,362.78 

i.S. Window Cleaning 1,200.00 

^. S. Fuel 7, 480. 35 

I. S. Plant Supplies 3,006.44 
^.S. Major Repairs 5,009.08 

'Clem. Salaries, Janitors 36,509.65 

Clem. Wages, Extra Help 190.80 

Clem. Repairs, Building 2,770.63 

Clem. Window Cleaning 1,161.24 

Clem. Fuel 10, 663. 49 

' Clem. Plant Supplies 6, 340. 82 

jClem. Major Repairs 9,853.80 

fialary. Administrative 5,980.00 



School Operating Plants (continued): 
Salaries, Maintenance Help 
Telephone, Shop 
Water, Shop 

Repairs, Shop Equipment 
Repairs, Vehicle 
Small Tools & Equipment 
Supplies, Repairs 
Gas & Oil 

Outlay, Shop Machinery 
Wages, School Grounds Maint. 
Care of School Grounds 
Outlay, New Vehicle 

Vocational Training: 
Travel Reimbursements 
Tuition Fee s 

Public Library: 

Salary, Librarian 

Wages, Asst. Librarian 

Wages, Vacation Substitutes 

Wages, Janitor 

Services, Clerical 

Binding 

Electricity 

Telephone 

Water 

Repairs, Building 
Office Supplies 
Supplies, Books 
Supplies, Fuel Oil 

Recreation: 



Salary, Director 

Wages, Supervisors 

Utilities 

Office Supplies 

First Aid Supplies 

Playground & Beach Supplies 

Bonds & Insurance: 



Bonds 

Workmen's Comp. & P/L 
Public Liability Vehicles 
Fire, Theft Vehicles 
Engineer's Equipment 
Voliinteer Fire Department 
Boiler Insurance 
Fire & Ext. Coverage Building 
Tree Dept. Equip. Fire, etc. 



11, 516. 


00 




110. 


33 




2. 


00 




199. 


20 




228. 


43 




319. 


74 




547. 


04 




10. 


39 




674. 


00 


6, 


921. 


55 


2, 


395. 


46 


3, 


498. 


49 



144, 460. 21 

397. 50 
3, 335. 17 
3, 732. 67 

3, 692. 30 
1, 505. 70 
102. 50 
420. 00 
_38L_90__ 
45. 40 
191. 241 ° 
95, 12^ 
21. 00 
238. 59 
180. 28 
4, 853. 18 
108. 89 
1 1, 836. 10 

850. 00 
5, 513. 00 
50. 32 
25. 25 
48. 53 

244. 52 



6, 731. 


62 


1, 486. 


56 


12, 034. 


45 


6, 452. 


45 


492. 


06 


39. 


73 


175. 


50 


466. 


60 


5, 337. 


71 


25. 


00 


26, 510. 


06 



139 



Intere st: 






Uncla s sified; 






Water JDonds 


9, 129. 


Id 








Anticipation Notes 


14, 958. 


L L 
DO 


Training & Conferences and 






Anticipation of Serial Issue 


2, 927. 


65 


Out of State Travel 


1 1 C7 

1 , \.0L . 




iire/Police Building 


n C L 

(bo. 


25 


Town Report 


L, c. I J. 


"7 A 


0«T 1 T 

bcnool l^oans 


DO, 047. 


DO 


Tax Title &c Legal Assistance 


o Dy . 


1 u 


Street Construction Bonds 


2 , 022. 


00 


Town Clock Repairs 




U U 


Public Sewer Bonds 


2,912. 


00 


Unpaid Bills of previous years 






Police Building & Highway Garage 


4, 480. 


00 


He serve r und 


1 f , O ( D. 


Li 

D ( 




103, 233. 


8 1 


Memorial Day 


1 , lUU. 


UU 


Maturing Debt: 






Lease of Quarters 


2, 250. 


00 


Water Bonds 


47, 000. 


00 


4-H Town Committee 


100. 


00 


Fire/Police Bonds 


5, 000. 


00 


Construct Municipal Garage 


39. 499. 


96 


School Bonds 


175, 000. 


00 


Inventory Town Owned Equipment 


513. 


00 


Street Construction Bonds 


13, 000. 


00 


Construct and Equip New Police 






Public Sewer Mains 


15, 000. 


00 


Building 


57, 362. 


88 


Police Building & Highway Garage 


14, 000. 


00 










269, 000. 


00 









140 



FIRE ALARM SIGNALS 



Main and Church Sts. 
Main St. and Middlesex 
Ave. 

Main and Clark Sts. 
Washington Ave. 
Clark St. and Railroad 
Ave. 

Ma.in St. and Bridge 
Lane 

Brand Ave. and Wiser St. 
Baker St. and Taplin 
Ave. 

Philips Ave. and Wild 
St. 

Main St. and 
Massachusetts Ave. 
Main and Harnden Sts. 
Harnden St. and Glen Rd. 
Glen and Miller Rds. 
Glen Rd. and Jones Ave. 
Main St. and Grove Ave. 
Grove Ave. and 
Cottage St. 

Mildred Rogers School 
Grove Ave. and Winchell 
Rd. 

Grove Ave. and Lake St. 

Main and Lake Sts. 

Fitz Terr. 

Warren Rd. 

Main St. and Fairfield 

Rd. 

Fairfield and Faulkner 
Rds. 

Main St. Tewksbury 
Line 

Shawsheen Ave. and 
Shawsheen Rd. 
Shawfsheen Ave. and 
Grand St. 

Grand and Birch Sts. 
S}\awsheen and Nassau 
Aves. 

Nassau Ave. and Dutton 
Rd. 

Shawsheen Ave. and 
Carter Lane 
Shawsheen Ave. and 
Aldrich Rd. 

Aldrich Rd. and Hardin 
St. 

Aldrich Rd. and Boutwell 
St. 

Aldrich Rd. and Forest 
St. 

Aldrich Rd. and Winston 
St 

Aidrich Rd. Billerica 
Line 

Shawsheen Ave. 
Cranberry Bog. 
Shawsheen Ave. and 
Bond St. 

Shawsheen Ave. and 
Hopkins St. 
Hopkins St. Billerica 
Line 

Shawsheen Ave. and 
Nichols St. 



1385 

139 
14 
211 

2112 
2114 
212 

2122 

2124 
2125 
2127 

2128 

2129 

213 
2133 
2136 



214 

2141 
2142 

215 

2151 
216 

217 

2171 
2173 
231 
311 
312 

3121 



313 
314 
315 
3151 
3152 
316 
317 
32 
3212 

321 
322 
3231 
3232 

3233 

3234 
3235 

324 
3241 

3242 



Nichols St. Billerica 

Si:::vsheen Ave. 
Unit Packet Corp. 
Burlington Ave. and 
Harris St. 

Cedar St. and Burt Rd. 
Ceder St. and Oak Ct. 
Burlington Ave. and 
Chestnut St. 

Chestnut St. and Butters 
Row 

Chestnut St. and Mill Rd. 
Mill Rd. Burlington Line 
Chestnut St. and Hillside 
Way 

Hillside Way Burlington 
Line 

Chestnut St. Woburn Line 

Old Age Housing 
Marion and Clifton Sts. 
Marion St. (Between 
Clifton and Chestnut 
Sts.) 

Burlington Ave. and 
Boutwell St. 

Boutwell St. and Taft Rd. 
Boutwell St. and 
Roosevelt Rd. 
Burlington Ave. and 
Swain Rd. 

Swain and Taft Rds. 
Burlington Ave. and 
Beach St. 

Burlington Ave. and 
Forest St. 

Forest St. and Swain Rd. 
Forest St. and Pershing 
Boutwell St. School 
Main and Lowell Sts. 
Main St. and Butters 
Row. 

Butters Row (Between 
Chestnut St. and Main 
St.) 

Memorial Park 
Greer Company 
Main and Eames Sts. 
Eames St. R.R. Crossing 
Raffi & Swanson Co. 
Main St. and Cook Ave. 
Main St. Woburn Line 
Lowell and Parker Sts. 
Parker and Blackstone 
Sts. 

Lowell and Cross Sts. 
Lowell and Bay Sts. 
Woburn and Elm Sts. 
Woburn St. and 
Brentwood Ave. 
Woburn St. and Morse 
Ave. 

Woburn and Eames Sts. 
Woburn St. Woburn 
Line 

Lowell and West Sts. 
West St. and Westdale 
Ave. 

West and Grove Sts. 



3243 
3244 

3245 
325 
41 
42 

43 
431 

432 

433 

44 
441 

45 

46 

461 

462 

47 
48 

481 

482 
483 
51 

511 

512 

513 

521 

522 
525 
5253 
526 

53 

54 

541 

5412 

5413 

5414 

542 
544 
546 
547 

548 
55 

56 
57 
571 



Grove St. Reading Line 
West St. and Suncrest 
Ave. 

West St. Reading Line 
Lowell St. Reading Line 
Church St. Fire House 
Church and Columbia 
Sts. 

Church and Beacon Sts. 

Walker School 

Beacon St. and Fairview 

Ave. 

Fairview Ave. and 
Adams St. Ext. 
Church and Clark Sts. 
Clark St. and Middlesex 

A.e. 

Church St. and Thurston 
Ave. 

Church and Adams Sts. 

St. Thonnas Aux. 

Adams St. and Adams 
St. Ext. 

Senior High School 
Church St. and 
Middlesex Ave. 
School St. and Junior 
High School 
Buzzell School 
Center School 
Middlesex Ave. and 
Wildwood St 
Wildwood St (Near 
A. S. Hudson) 
Wildwood St School 

Wildwood and Woburn 
Sts. 

Glendale Circle 
Glen Rd. R. R. Crossing 
Glen Rd. and King St. 
King and Bartlett Sts. 
Glen Rd. and St. Paul St. 
Middlesex Ave. Town 
Hall 

Middlesex Ave. euid 
Federal St 
Federal and Concord 
Sts. 

Concord and Woburn 
Sts. 

Woburn St. (Near 

A. S. Eames) 

Concord St No. Reading 

Line 

Federal and Grant Sts. 
Federal and Lincoln Sts. 
Federal and Liberty Sts. 
Woburn and Federal 
Sts. 

Woburn and West Su. 
Middlesex and Mystic 
Aves. 

C. S. Harriman Tannery 
Whitefleld School 
Shady Lane Drive and 
Oakdale Rd. 



Rd. 

Tewksbury 
Ballardvale 
St (Near 
(Near 
(Near 



572 Shady Lane Drive and 
Lawrence St. 

58 Middlesex Ave. and 
North St 

581 North St (Between 
Middlesex Ave. and 
Dadant Drive) 

59 Middlesex Ave. and 
High St 

591 High and Woburn Sts. 

592 Woburn and Park Sts. 

593 Parlt and Gowing Sts. 

594 Park St. No. Reading 
Line 

61 Middlesex Ave. and 
Salem St. 

62 Salem St. R. R. 
Crossin-j (Portland) 

63 Salem St R. R. 
Crossing (Lawrence) 

64 Salem and Cunningham 
Sts. 

65 Salem St. and Silver 
Lake Rd. 

651 McDonald 

67 Salem St. 
Line 

68 Salem and 
Sts. 

681 Ballardvale 
R. R. Bridge) 

682 Ballardvale St 
Friends Farm) 

683 Ballardvale St. 
Thomas Morely) 

684 Ballardvale St. Andover 
Line 

69 Salem and Andover Sts. 

691 Andover and Woburn 
St.. 

692 Andover St. and Upton 
Ct 

693 Andover St (Near 
T. C. Daley) 

694 Andover St Andover 
Line 

71 Salem and Woburn Sts. 
711 Woburn St and 

Hathaway Rd. 
714 Hathaway and Sheridan 
Rd». 

72 Salem St. Town Dump 

73 Salem St. No. Reading 
Line 



2 All Out 

22 No School (7:00 & 7:15 
A.M.) 

3 Special Call 

4 Special Call 

7 Police Call 

8 Boy Scouts 
10 Out of Town 

666 Civil Defense 



-J 





E 
2 



u 

c 

IE 



POLICE 

Numbers 
8-3331 or 8-3332 



AMBULANCE 

Numbers 
8-3200 or 8-3346 



FIRE 

Numbers 
8-3200 or 8-3346 



FOR INFORMATION ON: 


CALL 


DEPARTMENT 


Aid to Dependent Children 


8-221 1 


Welfare Department 


Asses sm e nt s 


8-3314 


Board of Assessors 


Bills and Accounts 


8-3313 


Town Accountant 


Birth Ce rtificcite s 


8-3312 


Town Clerk 


Board of Selectmen 


8-3314 


Clerk of Board 


By-law s 


8-3312 


Town Clerk 


Cennete r y 


8-3901 


Cemetery Department 


Civilian Defense 


8-3556 


Director of Civil Defense 


Civilian Defense 


8-8071 


Headquarter s 


Complaints (general) 


8-3311 


Town Manager 


Con struct ion 


8-3313 


Building Inspector 


Contagious Diseases 


8-3313 


Board of Health 


Dead Animal Removal 


8-3770 


Dog Officer 


Death Certificates 


8-3312 


Town Clerk 


Disability Assistance 


8-221 1 


Welfare Department 


Engine e ring 


8-3311 


Engineer 


Elections 


8-3312 


Town Clerk 


Employment, Town 


8-3311 


Town Manager 


Entertainment Permits 


8-3314 


Board of Selectmen 


Fire 


8-3200 


Fire Department 


Food Inspection 


8-3313 


Board of Health 


Fuel Oil Storage 


8-3346 


Fire Department 


Garbage Collection 


8-3313 


Board of Health 


Health (general) 


8-3313 


Board of Health 


Immunization Clinics 


8-3313 


Board of Health 


Legal ^Matters 


8-2026 


Town Counsel 


J-i ib r ar y 


8-2967 


Public Library 


Tvippncip^ and Pe t m i f <^ 


8-3312 


T n CI p T" k 


Maps (official) 


8-3312 


T ow n Clerk 


N/fillc Tn ci'ne p 1 1 oTi 


8-3313 


T-Tp altVi F)pna T*tm p nt 


Old Age Assistance 


8-221 1 


W^elf 3.r e Dep3.rtment 


Parks and Playgrounds 


8-390 1 


Cemete ry Department 


Pl^nnincy Ro;^rd 


8-3311 


A or P n t 1 T r~>\x/ t\ ^.t\ cr i ti ^ t* I 

Xx. H C 1 X L ^ J. KJ W 1 1 lllj^XXlCCi. / 


Polic e 


8-3331 


"Pol 1 1*^3 T" trY^ f> n t 


Property (Town Owned) 


8-3314 


Ro^^Trl of .Splppt m p n 

■1 — ' \J CL i. \A W X ^ A. w LllXV^ll 


Property (Tax Title) 


8-3313 


T own T reasurer 


Purchasing 


8-3313 


Purchasing Clerk 


Recreation Program 


8-2052 


IDi rector of Recreati on 


School s 


8-2052 


fiiiT^p T"intpTiHpnt of ScHools 


Sewage Permits 


8-3313 


Board of Health 


Street Lights 


8-3311 


Town Manager 


Street Maintenance 


8-4481 


Highway Department 


Taxe s 


8-3314 


Board of Assessors 


Tax Collection 


8-3312 


Tax Collector 


Trees 


8-2809 


Tree Warden 


Veterans Benefits 


8-2514 


Veterans Agent 


Veterans Housing 


8-8531 


Housing Authority 


Veterans Services 


8-2514 


Veterans Agent 


Vital Statistics 


8-3312 


Town Clerk 


Voting, Registration, etc. 


8-3312 


Registrars of Voters 


Water 


8-4711 


Water Department 


Welfare, Public 


8-221 1 


Welfare Department 


Wi re Inspection 


8-3313 


Building Inspector 


Zoning 


8-3313 


Building Inspector 



1961 

NNUAL Report 




TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
MASSACHUSETTS 



WILMINGTON'S PRESENTATION 



Exactly eight years ago on a bleak, wind-tortured December day, I became a resident of Wilmington, 
Massachusetts. It was not an auspicious introduction to the community, and I mention this because it 
qualifies me as an impartial observer to many of the dramatic changes worked in a decade of progress 
by the citizens of Wilmington, themselves. I say "worked" because these changes did not just happen. 
They were conceived, planned, and carried to execution by the residents of the town in a demonstration 
of citizen responsibility and resourcefulness experienced in few communities. 

The house, which has become my home, was constructed in 1720, ten years before the incorporation of 
the town. One of its most charming features was a huge and historic elm, planted more than three hun- 
dred years ago to mark a grant of land from the King of England, known as "Land of Nod". 

After more than two and a quarter centuries, the house retains its classic, colonial lines, and its rugged 
stability. The tree was attacked by rot. Its trunk was patched with tons of cement. Finally heavy steel 
cables no longer could hold its massive boughs together. Reluctantly I recently had to have it cut down. 

In a way, the house and tree were symbolic of the community. The town, like the house, retained in 
essence its rugged Colonial character; but like the tree, time was eating away at it. History, which 
Wilmington had helped to create, was passing it by. 

In fact, the town was living so completely in the spirit of the "Land of Nod", it was asleep to the fact that 
its wooded lakeside had become a hideout for known criminals, among them a member of the infamous 
Brinks bandits; that it was infested by bootlegging, illegal liquor, after-hour joints, and professional 
gambling. 

Then in the past decade, or so, Wilmington, like so many other small communities, was struck by the 
postwar flight from the city to suburbia. From the late 40's into the 1960's, the population nearly 
doubled twice, from 4, 645 to its present thirteen thousand (13, 000). The community was ill prepared 
for its sudden growth. The very richness of its increased numbers was enough to bankrupt it. But not 
for long I Thousandsl of eager new home owners became a civic-blood transfusion for the old residents. 
Together, old residents and new, found a new and driving stimulation toward enlightened citizenship. 
What was good enough for their ancestors and the centuries past was no longer sufficient for their 
children and the future. 

Wilmington faced its community problems and resorted to some drastic surgery, also. It got rid of 
the gamblers, the bars, the hideouts. It saw the necessity for improved police and fire protection, 
school and recreation facilities. Most of all, Wilmington's citizens recognized the need for modern 
government. That's where reform made its start. Citizen groups organized. They generated a momen 
turn which a decade later has not yet run down. 

In 1949 the state legislature approved a change in Wilmington's charter. The following year, at the 
urging of the Baldwin Civic Association and several other enthusiastic citizen groups, the voters of 
Wilmington adopted the Town Manager plan over unrelenting opposition. 

Yet, the citizens retained in their own hands the final and ultimate authority for the appropriating and 
expenditure of all funds through the retention of the Town Meeting. Thus, Wilmington emerged with a 
December-May marriage of the oldest and newest forms of government in the United States. It has 
been a happy and productive union. Today more citizens than ever participate actively in government, 
even though they have turned the administration over to trained professionals. 

In addition to its full time administrative staff, Wilmington has approximately one hundred twenty-five 
employees, exclusive of the school system. They represent the paid clerical and labor force. 

(Continued - inside back cover) 



INDEX 



Page 



Accepted Streets 76 

Animal Inspector 83 

Board of Appeals 28 

Board of Assessors 24 

Board of Health 55 

Board of Public Welfare 51 

Board of Registrars 15 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Boards, Committees, and Commissions 13 

Building Inspector 38 

Carter (Sarah D. J. ) Lecture Fund 73 

Cemetery Department 44 

Constable 19 

Directory of Officials 12 

Dog Officer 3 3 

Fire Department 36 

Highway Department 60 

Housing Authority 84 

In Memoriam - Gaius E. Harmon, M. D 4 

Herbert Barrows 5 

George H. Fuller 6 

Harry J. Ainsworth 7 

Jury List 48 

Permanent Building Committee 86 

Planning Board 26 

Plans for the Future 9 

Police Department 34 

Progress - 1961 8 

Public Library 46 

Recreation Commission 37 

School Committee 66 

School Maintenance Department 74 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 85 

Superintendent of Schools 68 

Tax Charts 10 

Town Accountant 107 

Town Clerk ., 16 

Town Collector 18 

Town Counsel 20 

Town Engineer 27 

Town Manager 11 

Town Meetings: Special Town Meeting - Feb. 11, 1961 88 

Annual Town Meeting - Mar. 4, 1961 91 

Special Town Meeting - June 5, 1961 99 

Warrant Annual Town Meeting - March 3, 1962 101 

Town Treasurer 17 

Tree Department 40 

Veterans' Agent 39 

Water & Sewer Department 42 

Wilmington Welcomes New Industries 64 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN - 1961 




Town of Wilmington 

Massachusetts 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

The past year has produced tangible evidence that Wilmington is an alert and progressive community, fully 
deserving of its nomination for an All-America award due to the outstanding participation of its citizens in 
public affairs. 

New industries dot the town's map, and established enterprises have been expanded - all broadening the 
base of the municipal tax.. More industries are already under construction or planned for 1962. 

New schools have been constructed to provide better education for your children, and plans already are 
being formulated for the location and acquisition c£ new school sites and the construction of further educa- 
tional facilities. Recreation facilities have been improved. New homes have been built, and roads ex- 
tended and improved. 

But this is not enough. Wilmington, like the rest of the nation, is entering a new era of expansion and 
development. We must be prepared to play a proportionate role in it. Unrestrained spending, however, 
is not the way. That could lead only to disaster. 

So, this is an invitation to all residents of the community without exception, to take a more active interest 
and part in the conduct of municipal affairs. Wilmington is going to be faced with serious financial pro- 
blems in the near future. We already have a substantial burden of debt. This could become overwhelming. 
The public debt is going to be increased constantly as the town requires more schools, other public build- 
ings, and services. The rate of that increase must be determined by careful planning and wise decision. 

You, the taxpayers, must make the ultimate decision. You, and only you, are invested with the legal 
authority to appropriate the money needed to finance these projects. Obviously, it is imperative that the 
financing be planned and executed with care. Priorities must be established according to the immediate - 
ness of the need of each project. Those needed most must be provided first. All others must be postponed. 

This will require inspired and unselfish leadership. But, more, it will demand the inspired and wise under 
standing support of the citizenry of the town. Wilmington did not earn its All-America nomination by 
accident. In the past, its citizens demonstrated wisdom and energy in their striving for good government. 
There is no reason to believe they will not in the future. 

It is with reliance on this past performance and present hope that the Board of Selectmen look forward with 
confidence to further growth - spiritually and morally, as well as materially - in the life of the community 
in 1962. 

Respectfully submitted. 
Board of Selectmen 



IN MEMORIAM 





Graduate of Thayer Academy 1905 
Graduate of Boston University School of Medicine - first in his class 6/02/09 
Harvard and M. 1. T. School for Health Officers - Certificate of Public Health 6/11/14 
Harvard University - M. P. H. in lieu of certificate given in 1914 and for 

accomplishments in the field of Public Health in the interim 
Chairman, Vital Statistics Section of the American Public 

Health Association 9/10/33 - 9/23/36 



Town of Wilmington: 

Member, Water Main Extension Advisory Committee 8/01/49 - 1/08/52 

Chairman, Board of Health 3/12/51 - 7/01/52 

Member, Board of Health 6/16/54- 5/12/56 

Chairman, Union Health Dept. Committee of the Town 11/10/52 - 3/12/55 

Member, Water Extension Committee 3/10/55 - 3/10/56 

Member, Town Manager Advisory Capital Outlay Committee 12/15/54 - 12/15/56 



To each of these appointments he brought a wealth of knowledge and a lifetime of 
experience. Under his able leadership the Board of Health was reorganized, a full-time 
Sanitarian employed, making the Board of Health an up-to-date and effectively function- 
ing unit. 



His keen interest in the welfare of the town, his quiet devotion to the task at hand, and 
his careful attention to details, were attributes which endeared him to his fellow workers 
and for which he will be long remembered. 



4 



IN MEMORIAM 




Herbert C. Barrows viewing scale model is 

of the AVCO buildings ~ | 

When Herbert C. Barrows died October 2, 1961, he left the Town of Wilmington a legend 2 i 

and a priceless heritage. o 

He had been a resident of the community for sixty-seven years. During that time he served C £ 

his fellow citizens in many official capacities. He had been a member of the Board of Fire £ 2 

Engineers and a Deputy Fire Warden. He had been a Library Trustee. Also he had served ^ 

as a member of the Board of Selectmen. g 

But it was as longtime member and chairman of the Finance Committee that he left his 5 
mark indelibly on the community. It was in this office that Herbert C. Barrows taught 
his fellow officials and fellow citizens the meaning of fiscal responsibility. 

His unrelenting fight against unnecessary expenditures of municipal funds has become 
legendary. His was not always a popular stand. Sometimes he fought alone. But even 
his opponents recognized his position. 

His fellow townspeople partially recognized his great contribution to their community life 
by dedicating to him, in his lifetime, the municipal auditorium. And in 1959, although 
inactive due to illness, he was made an honorary member for life of the Finance Committee. 

But the greatest tribute the Town of Wilmington pays Herbert C. Barrows is the acceptance 
by its officials of the priceless heritage he left - that fiscal responsibility must be defended 
constantly; and the lessons they learned from association with him - that even in this era 
of inflated values, there is still substance in such old majcims as "a dollar saved is a 
dollar earned". 



5 



IN MEMORIAM 




Officer George H. Fuller was appointed a Special Police Officer in 1939, and appointed 
a Permanent Officer in 1942 serving in that capacity until his death in October, 1961. 

George performed his duties with great enthusiasm and endeared himself to all who served 

with him. If trouble came our way, he was always in the thick of it and once received 

a call from the F. B. I. that they were looking for a fugitive who was considered armed and 
dangerous, and a tip was received by them that this subject might be found in Wilmington. 
During his tour of duty, George came across this subject in a local dine and dance, and 
captured him in a real rough and tumble knock 'em down and drag 'em out scuffle. But 
this was George - feared nothing! 

George received a congratulatory letter for this outstanding bit of police work from 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. This became one of 

George's cherished possessions. 

The finest tribute that could be paid George would be to say, "George was truly a Good 
Cop". In so doing, I am certain that all those who served with him give testimony to 
that. His untimely death was a tragic loss to the department. 

It was with a deep and profound sympathy that we recorded the death of our beloved 
brother officer in the year 1961. 



6 



IN MEMORIAM 




Harry J. Ainsworth came to Wilmington in 1929 from North Andover, Massachusetts. 
In 1930 he was appointed Chief of Police and served in that capacity until 1947, at which 
time he resigned the chief's job to take over his new duties of Chief Probation Officer 
of the Woburn District Court - retiring from that position in 1959. 

When the "Chief" relinquished his job to take over his new office, he left it with a heavy 
heart. Sad to leave all that he had worked so hard to realize, yet overjoyed to move up 
the ladder of success. 

He was not tired of being Chief of Police for the Town of Wilmington - for he loved the 
work and devoted his every conscious minute to it. It was because of a kindly gentleman 
the Honorable William E. Henchey, Justice of the Woburn District Court, who needed a 
chief probation officer. He wanted Chief Ainsworth for the job and wouldn't take "No" 
for an answer. 

During his time as Chief he distinguished himself in many ways and had the admiration 
of all his fellow law enforcement agents throughout the State. On one occasion, the so- 
called, "Spot Murder Case" on Kelly Hill, received national coverage in a Crime Story 
Magazine . 

To try to cover all the fine accomplishments of Chief Ainsworth from 1930 to 1947 would 
be paramount. I would not dare to try! But to say that, "He served long, and that 

he served well'.' I'll testify to that ! I'm most certain that all who knew Chief 

Ainsv/orth will subscribe to that testimonial. 

It was with a deep and profound sympathy that we recorded the death of our former 
beloved Chief of Police in the year 1961. 



PROGRESS 



WHAT WE DID IN 1961 

. T. . . . special Town Meeting in February - rezoning industrial land for Guild Plastics, Inc. and Insul-Tab Co. 

new vehicles - two police cruisers, highway truck. 

new equipnaent - lawn nnower, front-end loader and back-hoe. 

connected to M. D. C. sewerage system. 

drainage - Powder House Circle. 

paved avenues in Cemetery. 

made formal application for Chapter 91 project to clean, dredge, and widen Ipswich River. 

March 1961 - started construction Waltham Door & Window. 

appointed two police sergeants - Charles Ellsworth and Arthur Kelley. 

accident insurance obtained on policemen and firemen. 

new policemen appointed - John Harvey, James Palmer, Patrick Leonard. 

Boutwell Street widened. 

after extensive survey by Water Commissioners, money was appropriated to develop the Chestnut Street 

well field. 

May 1961 - started construction Guild Plastics, Inc. and Webster Cement Co. 

June 1961 - started construction North Intermediate School. 

August 1961 - started construction Insul-Tab Co. 

sold bonds for well field and Intermediate School at 3. 2% interest for twenty years. 

industrial permits - 11, school permit - 1, commercial garages - 3, gas stations - 3. 

finalist in nationwide All-America contest that is sponsored by the National Municipal League and 

Look Magazine. 

two more of our police officers graduated from the State Police Academy. 

constructed new sidewalks on Boutwell Street and Middlesex Avenue. 

completed Pineridge Road and Carolyn Road. 

over $1, 500, 000 - new assessed valuation. 

increased facilities at Silver Lake. 

8 



THE JOB AHEAD 



WHAT WE PLAN FOR THE FUTURE 

continue efforts to attract new industry, 
continue tree planting program, 
provide new Town Hall facilities, 
provide new Library facilities, 
adopt revised building code, 
mechanize town bookkeeping system. 

continue procedure to correct street drainage program. 

continue our program for proper street lighting. ^ 
continue our sidewalk program. _ '4 

~ i 

dredge, widen, and relocate the Ipswich River and its tributaries. ^ 

(1) 2 

erect street signs for renamed streets. |2 Dfl 

C B 

initiate and develop a municipal -owned and operated sanitary landfill operation for disposal of s 



rubbish. 

acquire new school sites. 

continue formal training at State Police Academy for police officers, 
have complete survey for future well fields, 
continue sewerage for entire town. 



c 

i 



9 



HOW WILMINGTO 


N'S TAX RATE COMPARES WITH OTHER TOWNS 


TOWN 




iQ(=;i 


IMPRPACp |M TAV RATFQ IQRn-IQf^l 
IIMV-'rvCMoL. MN IMA rxMI Co \^D\J Ic^Ol 


WILMINGTON 


56.00 


67.00 


^ 11.00 ^ 


BURLINGTON 


53.00 


66.00 




NORTH ANDOVER 


43.00 


60.00 


^^Al7 OO IH 


NATICK 


45.60 


66.00 


^■■A 2 40 ^^fl 


DAN VERS 


49.00 


69.60 


|[^BBA ?o fio 


READING 


43.00 


65.00 


^■HH^ ?2.oo^M 


NEEDHAM 


38.00 


61.70 


^^■^^^23.70 


STONEHAM 


50.00 


79.00 




LEXINGTON 


43.00 


73.00 


^^^^^^■^^^ nn ^i^B 


BRAINTREE 


44.00 


74.00 




SAUGUS 


41.00 


76.40 




WAYLAND 


49.00 


86.00 


^^^■■■■^■■k ^7 OO 


CHELMSFORD 


53.00 


92.00 




CONCORD 

BILLERICA 

TEWKSBURY 


53.00 
34.00 
40.00 


98.60 
93.00 
1 00.00 











TAX RATE 


ANALYSIS 












1950 




1957 




1958 




1959 




I960 


1961 




Assessed Valuation 
Tax Levy 
Tax Rate 


7, 865, 913 
440, 49 1 
56 


00 
13 
00 


16, 774, 982 
1. 059, 522 
62 


00 19,228,670 
87 1,275,344 
80 66 


00 
22 
00 


23,855.002 
1, 533, 156 
64 


25 
14 
00 


24. 269. 675. 00 
1. 553, 259. 00 
64. 00 


27, 161, 064 
1. 722, 226 
67 


00 
20 
00 


Net Cost from Taxes; 
Schools 

Town Government 
State, County Agencies 


135, 293. 70 
275, 723. 43 
28, 474. 00 


585, 822 
447, 569 
26, 130 


89 
02 
96 


650, 711 
599, 247 
25, 385 


00 
66 
56 


804. 669 
692. 625 
35, 931 


00 
92 
61 


887, 137. 00 
641.844. 11 
24, 277. 89 


1, 028. 642 
610. 422 
8 3, 162 


00 
05 
15 


TOTAL TAX LEVY 


440, 491 


13 


1, 059. 522 


87 


1, 275, 344 


22 


1, 533. 226. 53 


1, 553, 259. 00 


1. 722, 226. 20 


School Tax Rate 

Town Tax Rate 

State, County Tax Rate 


17. 20(30. 
35. 20(63. 
3. 60( 6. 


7% 
0% 
3% 


34. 75(55. 
26. 50(42. 
1. 55( 2. 


.0%) 
6%) 
4%) 


33. 68(51. 
31. 01(46. 
1. 3I( 1. 


02%) 
99%) 
99%) 


33. 59(52. 
28. 91(45. 
1. 50( 2. 


49%) 
17%) 
34%) 


36. 56(57. 12%) 
26. 44(41. 32%) 
1.00( 1.56%) 


37. 87(56. 
25. 16(37. 
3.97( 5. 


52%) 
55%) 
93%) 


TOTAL TAX RATE 


$56. 00 




$62.80 




$66. 00 




$64. 00 




$64. 00 


$67. 00 





10 



TOWN MANAGER 




Cecil O. Lancaster, Town Manager C P 

s 



hi > 

To the Citizens of Wilmington: C 

{E 

It is with pleasure that I present the 1961 Annual Report of the Town of Wilmington covering the eleventh » 
year of operation under the Town Manager form of government. * 

The year 1961 was a good year for the Town of Wilmington. Five new industries located in our town - plus 
the expansion of AVCO. It is of utmost importance to acquire new and diversified industries to help 
stabilize an attractive tax rate. This cannot be done or has not been done by any single individual; only by 
the combined efforts of your official family, both past and present, have such benefits been achieved. 

Many times you may read about graft and corruption in large cities or on a State or Federal level. I assure 
you that to the best of my knowledge we have a good clean town, and one for which I am proud to work and to 
j raise my family. This is further substantiated when The National Municipal League and Look Magazine 
j chose twenty-two communities throughout the country for All-America consideratign, and Wilmington is one 
j of them. 

I wish at this time to express my sincere appreciation to the Board of Selectmen, to the conscientious unpaid 
j boards, and to our loyal town employees for their continuing cooperation and interest. 

; Respectfully submitted, 

Cecil O. Lancaster 
Town Manager 



11 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS 



1961 



TOWN MANAGER 



Cecil O. Lancaster 



Term 
Expires 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



John D. Brooks, Chairman 
Wavie M. Drew 
Charles H. Black 
Donald C. Kidder 
Nicholas L. DeFelice 
Olive M. Sheldon, Clerk 



1962 
1962 
1963 
1963 
1964 



TOWN MODERATOR 



Simon Cutter 



Annually 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Ernest M. Crispo, Chairman 
George G. Robertie, Vice Chairman 
Robert F. Hastings, Secretary 
John F. Hartnett 
Arthur V. Lynch 
Edward F. Page 



1963 
1964 
1962 
1963 
1964 
1962 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS Harold S. Shea 



ADVISORY COMMITTEES 



BUILDING BY-LAW 
Roland Wood, Chairman 
Raymond F. Fitzmaurice 
Garnet Mills 



PERSONNEL 

John D. Brooks, Chairman 
Albert Blackburn, Jr. 
Paul Duggan 
Carl Gubellini 



SKATING RINK 
Carl A. Backman 
George W. Boylen, Jr. 
Lawrence H. Gushing 
Raleigh P. Nelson 
Roland L Wood 



TRANSPORTATION STUDY 

Lloyd C. Bender 

W. Paul Duggan 

Edward J. Shelley, recorder 

TOWN DUMP SURVEY 
Paul Godzyk, Chairman 
Raymond Fitzmaurice 
Erving Pfau 
Stanley Webber 



12 



BOARDS, COMMITTEES, AND COMMISSIONS 



APPEAL, BOARD OF 

Louis E. Gage, Chairman 

Parker E. Hodgdon 

Bruce MacDonald 

C. Homer Coursey, Associate 

Leidy Williams, Associate 

Robert B. Zarse, Associate 

ASSESSORS, BOARD OF 
Stanley Webber, Principal 
Olive M. Sheldon 
Maurice D. O'Neil 



Term 
Expires 
1964 
1962 
1963 
1962 
1962 
1962 



HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING 
Fred T . Corum 
Earle S. Hamilton 
J. Parker Pr indie 
Basil L. Weatherbee 

HISTORICAL COMMITTEE 
Rhoda H. Buzzell 
Harry R. Deming 
Gladys H. MacLeod 
Harold E. Melzar 
Elizabeth N. Neilson 



Term 
Expires 



CARTER LECTURE FUND COMMITTEE 

Mildred E. Neilson 1962 

Helen P. Hayward 1963 

Madelon C. Slater 1964 

Guy E. Nichols 1964 

Jacqueline C. Piatt 1964 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Joseph B. McMahon, Chairman 1962 

Guy E. Nichols 1963 

William F. Cavanaugh 1964 

ELECTION OFFICERS 

Harold E. Melzar, Warden Annually 

Stanley Webber, Deputy Warden " 

Simon Cutter, Clerk " 

Frances R. Cleveland, Deputy Clerk " 

Mildred A. Dolan, Inspector " 

Olive M. Sheldon, Inspector " 

Florence Balkus, Deputy Inspector " 

Elizabeth Cavanaugh, Deputy Inspector " 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

William P. Curtin, Chairman 1964 

Robert B. Michelson, Vice Chairman 1963 

Carl E. Gubellini, Secretary 1963 

Ralph H. Biggar 1963 

George W. Boylen, Jr. 1962 

John G. Hayward 1962 

Cornelius F. Joyce 1964 

Dr. John P. Silvers 1962 

William A. Stickney 1964 

HEALTH, BOARD OF 

Augustus C. Walker, Chairman 1962 

Erving S. Pfau 1963 

Marion C. Boylen 1964 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

James P. Donahue, Chairman 

Edward Sullivan, State Member, V.Ch. 

Edwin F. Forrest, Secretary 

Ernest B. Rice, Treasurer 

Ralph D. Peterson, Asst. Treas. 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

May Hadley 

Marjorie M. Emery 

Philip B. Buzzell 

Elizabeth N. Neilson 

Frankline E. Allen, Chairman 

Ralph Kelmon 

(Evelyn Norton, resigned) 

PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Erwin Hanke, Chairman 

Paul H. Niles, Secretary 

Joseph F. Courtney 

Raymond G. McClure 

Vincent R. McLain 

PLANNING BOARD 



Raymond F. Fitzmaurice, Chairman 

James F. Banda, Secretary 

Jeanne F. Gifford 

Charles E. Fogg 

Herbert Nickerson 

John R . Evans 

Joseph J. Slater 

(William Beers, resigned) 

(A. Daniel Gillis, resigned) 

RECREATION COMMISSION 
Maybelle A. Bliss, Chairman 
Lawrence H. Gushing, Director 
Carl A. Backman 
Donald F. Hebsch 
Edward M. Nichols 
Norbert L. Sell 



1962 
1963 
1963 
1965 
1966 



1962 
1962 
1963 
1963 
1964 
1964 



1963 
1963 
1962 
1965 
1965 



1962 
1962 
1963 
1964 
1964 
1965 
1966 



u 

2 



(0 



bo? 
c 



13 



30ARDS, COMMITTEES, AND COMMISSIONS 



REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 
Joseph P. Ring, Chairman 
F. Talbot Emery- 
Phyllis M. O'Leary 
Esther L. Russell, Clerk 

TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 
Philip B. Buzzell, Chairman 
Harold E. Melzar 
Edward M. Neilson 



i erm 

Expires WATER SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

1964 Harold E. Melzar, Chairman 

1963 Arnold C. Blake 

1962 Waldo A. Stevens 

WELFARE, BOARD OF PUBLIC 
Maurice D. O'Neil, Chairman 

1963 Florence A. Balkus 

1964 Anna M. Low 

1962 Walter F. Coleman, Director & Secretary 



Term 
Expire* 
1963 
1962 
1964 



OFFICERS & DEPART ME NT HEADS 



Accountant 
Animal Inspector 
Building Inspector 
Cemetery Superintendent 
Civil Defense Director 
Constables 

Director of Public Welfare 

Dog Officer 

Engineer 

Fence Viewer 

Fire Chief 

Highway Superintendent 
Librarian 

Maintenance Superintendent 

Medical Agent, Board of Health 

Milk Inspector 

Milk Inspector (Temporary) 

Moth Superintendent 

Nurse, Public Health 

Nurses, School 

Physicians, School 

Plumbing Inspector 

Police Chief 

Public Health Officer 

Public Health Officer (Temporary) 

Sealer, Weights and Measures 

Slaughtering Inspector 

Town Clerk 

Town Clerk (Assistant) 
Town Collector 
Town Counsel 
Town Treasurer 
Tree Warden 
Veterans Agent 
Veterans Grave Officer 
Water Superintendent 
Wire Inspector 



Robert H. Peters 
Leo E. LeBlanc 
Minot J. Anderson 
Francis Downs 
Rene J. LaRivee 
Arthur Kelley, A. John Imbimbo 
Walter Coleman 
Leo E. LeBlanc 
Alphonse Savignac 
Maurice O'Neil 
Arthur J. Boudreau 
James H. White 
Clara P. Chipman 
Anton Thiel 
Gerald Fagan, M. D. 
(resigned) Patrick A. Thibeau 
Leo E. LeBlanc 
John W. Babine 
Ann Butters, R. N. 
Sylvia Levine, R. N., Helen E. Martin, R. N. 
Ernest C. MacDougall, M. D., Gerald Fagan, M. D. 

Herbert W. Pickering 
Paul J. Lynch 
(resigned) Patrick A. Thibeau 
Leo E. LeBlanc 
Alphonse Savignac 
Leo E. LeBlanc 
Esther L. Russell 
Sylvia Bowman 
Miriam H. Colucci 
Philip B. Buzzell 
Grace H. Rice 
John W. Babine 
Arthur Harper 
Guy E. Nichols 
Edmund H. Sargent 
Charles Webster 



14 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3, of the Town By-laws, meetings of the Board of 
Registrars are held on the second Monday of each nnonth for the registration of voters and the conduct of 
business. Under Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958, this meeting is open to the public and the press, and it 
is so posted in the Town Hall. 

Women married prior to January 1 must re-register under their marriage name. Naturalized 
citizens must have their naturalization papers with them when registering. 



New residents are requested to notify the Board of Registrars of the date which they take 
residence in the town. Any change of address within the town during the year should be brought to the 
attention of the Board so that your name will not be removed from the voting list in error. 

In order to keep the voting list as up to date as possible, this board annually compares the 
voting list with the yearly street listing. If a voter's name does not appear on the street listing, it is 
subject to removal from the voting register. 

Population - January 1961 13, 026 



Registered voters - January 1962: 



Republicans 
Democrats 
Independents 
Total Voters 



867 
1129 
3472 
5468 



f 2? 
m5 




Standing; Joseph P. Ring, F. Talbot Emery 
Seated; Ester L. Russell, Phyllis O'Leary 



15 



TOWN CLERK 



Vital Statistics - Chapter 46, General Laws as Amended: 

BIRTHS - final figure for I960 Three Hundred and Fifty (350) 

BIRTHS - actually recorded to date in 1961 339 

(This figure will be increased when the final reports are in) 

MARRIAGE INTENTIONS - recorded in 1961 One Hundred and twenty-seven (127)\ 

MARRIAGES - recorded in 1961 One Hundred forty-one (141) 

DEATHS - recorded in 1961 105 

Chapter 46, Section 15: 

I 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians and registered hospital 
medical officers applying therefor, blanks for the return of births as required by law. 

Chapter 114, Section 45: 

Forty-two (42) Burial Permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent for the 
Board of Health. 

Town Records: 



Permits and Certificates of Registration for the Storage of Inflammables: 

These licenses must be registered by the owner or occupant of the land, or by the holder of the 
license in the Town Clerk's office on or before April 30 of each year. Notification will be sent on or about 
March 15. If not registered as required by law, the license may be revoked by the licensing authority, 
after a public hearing. Seventy (70) permits were recorded in 1961. 

Pole Locations recorded 23 

Uniform Commercial Code recordings 388 

Uniform Commercial Code Termination Recordings 48 

Dog Licenses Issued 1,258 

Duplicate Dog Tags Issued 23 

Business Certificates recorded 16 

Business Certificates recorded (Women doing business on separate account) 2 

Medical Registrations 1 

Fish and Game Licenses issued 637 

Other Services: 

Beach tags issued in 1961 409 

Certified copies of Births, Marriages, Deaths 153 

Proof of residence - by letter or card undetermined number 

Town By-laws, books and maps undetermined number 



16 



Other Services: 



Birth Certificate Cards: Used for school entrance, driver's licenses, out-of-state 

travel, and job applications formerly free since June 8, 1961 a charge of 

$. 50 must be made (General Law, Chapter 215, Acts of 1961. ) Prior to this law 
an undetermined number were issued after that date, fifty-five (55) were issued. 

Chapter 326, Acts of I960 - Zoning - An act providing that limited or conditional 
zoning variances and special permits shall not take effect until notice thereof is 
recorded in the Registry of Deeds by the Town Clerk Variances recorded - 21. 



There are thirty-eight (38) books, "Births, Marriages and Deaths" from 1730 to 1898, compiled by 
James E. Kelley still available at this office. By a vote of the Selectmen, these books are on sale at 
$1. 00 each. 

In order to complete our records, the Town Clerk would like to receive copies of back years of "Town 

Reports" and "Persons Listed" books. If you have such books and are willing to dispose of them, please 

contact this office. >^ 

V. 

k. 

JD 

<i> 5 

1? 



TOWN TREASURER 



Cash in Treasury, January 1 , 1961 $ 338,741.12 

Total Receipts 1961 5, 707, 419- 04 

6, 046, 160. 16 

Less Payments by Treasury Warrant 5, 164, 002. 30 

Cash in Treasury, January 1, 1962 $ 882,157.86 



17 



TOWN COLLECTOR 



Balance Commitments Collections Abate- Tax Balances 

12/31/60 1961 1961 ments Refunds Title 12/31/61 



Various Commitments 





1 , 574. 


89 






368. 


70 


173. 


47 










1 , 032 


72 


1959 






























X Oil 


64. 


00 






10. 


00 


10. 


00 










44 


nn 


Per sona.1 


u 1 . 








Q 1 
7 1 . 


20 


169 

1 U7 , 


60 










4 1 7 

Til 


An 

DVJ 


Exci se 


4 Q 1 5 
"I, 7 1 J 








2, 367. 


59 

-'7 


1 , 264. 


87 










1 , 4. J 


nn 




1 7 07 A 









1 1 294. 


33 


326. 


40 


q 
7 . 


? 5 


? 475 


nn 






^'Collection trans. 






























from I960 Real 






























Estate $2, 990. 40 














*2, 990. 


40 














1960 






























r^OlJ. 


fc. J , 


00 






74 


nn 


4? 


fin 


7 

Li . 


nn 






1 7 n 


nn 


Per sonal 


-7 , 1 ^ Q . 


00 






J , y DO . 


Q K 

7 -5 


ARD 

DO U . 


nn 


'^R4 


y^ 






R77 


nn 
uu 


Excise 


44, 782. 


38 


32, 987. 


44 


63, 302. 


36 


12, 935. 


24 


2, 935. 


52 






4, 467. 


74 


Farm Excise 


57. 


01 






33. 


38 














23. 


63 


Real Estate 


70, 661. 


30 






51, 981. 


39 


2, 262. 


40 


1, 325. 


34 


3, 019. 


20 


17, 861. 


25 


^Collection applies 






























lo 1737 xxeai 






























xLi si^aie ^ J , i J 1 . OKI 


















* 1 7 


An 










1 Q A 1 
I 7 1 






























Poll 






6, 896. 


00 


5, 782. 


00 


880. 


00 


16. 


00 






250. 


00 


Personal 






97, 565. 


00 


85, 170. 


97 


8, 687. 


27 


1, 287. 


74 






4, 994. 


50 


J-»X.C1 be 






203, 378. 


?7 


1 i^'^ Qf) 1 


4 1 


1 -J , J U . 




A 7 1 Q 


AR 

Do 






*xU ,071. 


■^7 








309. 


00 




Q7 


A 












•73 


44 

TT 


R A 1 H ' C f* ^ ^ A 

rxcdi xLfStcxte 




1, 723, 165. 


87 


1 '=iA'^ Am 




ft 7 Ron 
ti , 7 u . 




7 , v;^7 . 


n4 


7 0"^ A 

f , 7 J D . 


"^A 


77 7 A7 


1 J 


* 

Water Ljiens 






























1959 


228. 


04 






203. 


90 










24. 


14 






I960 


821. 


27 






493. 


30 










38. 


39 


289. 


58 


1961 






7, 041. 


60 


5, 286. 


63 










266. 


26 


1, 488. 


71 


Betterments 






























1959 






























Apport. Water 


151. 


41 






131. 


78 










19. 


63 






Comm. Interest 


200. 


68 






179. 


77 










20. 


91 






Apport. Street 


31. 


64 






15. 


82 










15. 


82 






Comm. Interest 


24. 


08 






12. 


04 










12. 


04 






I960 






























Apport. Water 


1. 078. 


61 






771. 


57 


25. 


62 






53. 


34 


228. 


08 


Comm. Interest 


786. 


36 






502. 


02 


17. 


07 






37. 


31 


229. 


96 


Apport. Street 


136. 


06 






62. 


85 














73. 


21 


Comm. Interest 


97. 


93 






45. 


21 














52. 


72 



18 



Commitments 
1961 



Collections 
1961 



Abate- 
ments 



Refunds 



Tax 
Title 



Balance s 
12/31/61 



I Betterments 



• 1961 



Apport. 


Water 


4, 425. 


90 


3, 751. 


00 


25. 


61 


40. 


65 


119. 


08 


570. 


86 


Comm. 


Interest 


2,817. 


09 


2, 239. 


70 


20. 


41 


18. 


80 


85. 


27 


490. 


51 


Apport. 


Street 


928. 


19 


826. 


57 










15. 


82 


85. 


80 


Comm. 


Interest 


606. 


92 


535. 


48 


1. 


76 






10. 


76 


58. 


92 


Apport . 


Water 


























paid 


in full 


6, 557. 


13 


6, 557. 


13 


















Comm. 


Intere st 


80. 


27 


80. 


27 



















I Apport. Street paid 



in full 


880. 


94 


880. 


94 




Comm. Interest 


8. 


33 


8. 


33 




Unapport. Water Bett. 


4, 125. 


86 


1, 167. 


96 


2 957. 90 



Deferred Water Bett. 

paid in full 
Comm. Interest 

Interest and costs 
Lien Certificates 
j Advertising Charges 



1, 287. 08 
20. 51 



1, 287. 08 
20. 51 



$2, 093 , 082. 06 $ 1, 967/227. 21 
5, 800. 19 
1,213. 00 
65. 00 



Balance to be apport. 1962 taxes 



1, 974, 305. 40 paid to Town Treasurer 



As 



a comparison: 



Amt. of 1961 Commitments 
Amt. of i960 Commitments 



2, 093, 082. 06 
1, 864, 438. 64 



I. 

k. 

£3 

-i 



CONSTABLE 



During the year 1961, I posted notices of Town Meetings and Town Warrants in accordance with 
the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington. I also posted and served notices for other departments of the Town 
of Wilmington. 



Il 



19 



TOWN COUNSEL 



In accordance with the requirements of the Town By-laws, I submit herewith my report as Town 
Counsel covering the year 1961: 

A. On January 1, 1961, there were pending the following actions by or against the Town 
(exclusive of actions in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, 
and of tax lien foreclosure proceedings in the Land Court): 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell. (Action of contract by City of 
Lowell to recover the sum of $Z75. 96 for special vocational training of certain pupils. ) 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell. (Action of contract by City of 
Lowell to recover $657. 77 plus interest for aid furnished in a public welfare case. ) 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell. (Action of contract by City of 
Lowell to recover $721. 90 for aid furnished in a public welfare case. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. A Certain Defendant, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. 
(Action of contract under G. L. Chap. 117, Sec. 5) 

Jacob Levine & Sons v. Town of Wilmington, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. 
(Action of contract to recover burial expense. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Edward N. Gadsby et als. Commissioners of Department of Public 
Utilities and Boston and Maine Railroad Company, Supreme Judicial Court, Suffolk County. (Petition to 
review certain rulings and orders of the Department of Public Utilities in connection with protection at the 
Middlesex Avenue Grade Crossing of the Boston and Maine Railroad. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Julia Godzyk, Administratrix of the Estate of Andrew Klebasz, Fourth 
District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Action of contract to recover amounts expended by the Town for 
support and hospital treatment of decedent. ) 

Town of V/ilmington v. Wendell Phillips, Middlesex Probate Court. (Petition to enforce obliga- 
tion to support. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Irving L. White, Middlesex Probate Court. (Petition to enforce obliga- 
tion to support. ) 

Wilmington Board of Health v. Nagel Stone, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin 
occupancy of substandard dwelling) 

Town of Wilmington v. Joseph DeCota, Jr. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. 
(Proceeding to enforce obligation to support. ) 

New England Gas Products Inc. v. Board of Appeal, Middlesex Superior Court. (Three separate 
appeals from refusal of building permit. ) 

John F. Hartnett et als. v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition in equity 
by ten taxpayers to compel the making of additional school appropriations by the Town. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition 
for assessment of damages in taking for state highway. ) 

20 




Town of Wilmington v. Stephen P. Hathaway et als, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity 
to enjoin removal of sand and gravel.) 



Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington v. James P. Donahue et al. Land Court. 
(Proceeding to secure verification of Planning Board's action in rescinding approval of part of subdivision 
plan. ) 

Paul Bongiorno et ux v. County of Middlesex and Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior 
Court. (Petition for assessment of damages in land taking. ) 

Wright & Pierce v. Town of Wilmington, United States District Court. (Action for breach of 

contract. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. William Baldwin et als, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to 
enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition 
for assessment of damages in land taking. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Francis X. Lang et als, Commissioners of Department o f Public 
Utilities, Supreme Judicial Court. (Appeal to the Supreme Judicial Court from the order of the Department 
of Public Utilities permitting certain reductions of passenger service by the Boston & Maine Railroad.) 

John J. and Mary T. Hayes v. County of Middlesex, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for [J 
assessment of damages in land taking. ) £ 

ti 

City of Boston v. Town of Wilmington, Suffolk Superior Court. (Action to recover for hospital «j 
care for resident of Wilmington. ) ^ 2 

Eg 

Campanella &t Cardi Construction Co. v. Alfred Calabrese, Middlesex Superior Court. (Tort 2? ^ 

action for malicious interference with contract and obstructing way. ) ~ c 

ll 

Town of Wilmington v. Poorvu Construction Co. Middlesex Superior Court. (Action of con- jjj^ 
tract for damages on account of defects in heating system of Wildwood School.) ; 

Town of Wilmington v. Allick Epstein, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Pro- ; 
ceeding to enforce obligation to support. ) ' 

Town of Wilmington v. City of Maiden, Middlesex Superior Court. (Action to recover re- 
imbursement for welfare payments. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. John Ben evento, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin 
removal of gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. George Vokey, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin 
removal of gravel. ) 

Poorvu Construction Co. v. Inhabitants of Town of Wilmington Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Action of contract to recover balance withheld on Wildwood School) 

John McSheffrey, Petitioner v. Inhabitants of Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Petition for assessment of damages for land taking. ) 

Philip J. Hennessey v. Board of Water Commissioners, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition 
for reduction of betterment assessment. ) 



21 



Town: 



B. (1) During the year 1961 the following new actions were brought by or on behalf of the 



Town of Wilmington v. Citizens Trust Co. , Middlesex Superior Court. (Action to recover 
deposit to secure bid for kitchen equipnnent at new North School. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Mary W. Folan, Adm. of Estate of Joseph F. DeCota et al, Middlesex 
Superior Court. (Action to recover Old Age Assistance payments. ) 

B. (2) During the year 1961 the following new actions were brought against the Town or its 
officers or agents: 

Massachusetts General Hospital v. Town of Wilmington, Third District Court of Eastern 
Middlesex. (Action to recover for hospital care. ) 

Minot Anderson et al v. Louis E. Gage et als, Board of Appeals, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Appeal from decision of the Board of Appeals denying application for variance. ) 

Curtis H. Ward v. County of Middlesex et al, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for assess- 
ment of land damages resulting from relocation of Federal Street. ) 

City of Boston v. Town of Wilmington, Boston Municipal Court. (Action to recover for hos- 
pital care. ) 

Millard Pipes et al v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for damages 
on account of land taking for the Water Department. ) 

Bessie Cohen, d/b/a/ Wilmington Grain Co. v. Board of Appeal, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Appeal from denial by Board of Appeal of application for variance. ) 



C. During the year 1961 the following actions by or against the Town were finally disposed 



of: 



John F. Hartnett et als v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Disposed of by 
settlement by agreement. ) 

Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington v. James P. Donahue et al. Land Court. (Dis- 
missed without prejudice by agreement with respondents to submit revised plan. ) 

Wright & Pierce v. Town of Wilmington, United States District Court. (Finally disposed of 
by affirmation by the Circuit Court of Appeals of decision of U. S. District Court in favor of the Town. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Francis X. Lang et als. Commissioners of Department of Public 
Utilities, Supreme Judicial Court. (Disposed of by dismissal by Supreme Judicial Court of the Town's appeal 
from the Order of the Department of Public Utilities. ) 

Campanella & Cardi Construction Co. v. Alfred Calabrese, Middlesex Superior Court. (Case 
settled by payment of $250. 00 by Town. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Poorvu Construction Co. Middlesex Superior Court. 

Poorvu Construction Co. v. Inhabitants of Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Both above cases disposed of by settlement by contribution by contractor of $700. 00 towards the cost of 
pump to correct heating defects. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. City of Maiden, Middlesex Superior Court. (Disposed of by payment 
by City of Maiden of $517. 45. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. John Benevento, Middlesex Superior Court. (Disposed of by agree- 
ment to dismiss. ) 

22 



Town of Wilmington v. George Vokey, Middlesex Superior Court. (Settled by agreement and 
payment by Vokey of Town's costs. ) 



Philip J. Hennessey v. Board of Water Commissioners, Middlesex Superior Court. (Disposed 
of by payment by Town of agreed settlement of $500. GO) 

Massachusetts General Hospital v. Town of Wilmington, Third District Court of Eastern 
Middlesex. (Disposed of by payment by Town of $215. 53 to hospital. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Mary W. Folan, Adm. of Estate of Joseph F. DeCota et al, Middlesex 
Superior Court. (Disposed of by payment to Town of $11, 200. 00) 

D. Compensation was received by the Town Counsel in said matters and in all other matters 
during the year as follows: 

Compensation $3,415.00 
Disbursements 35.91 



$3, 450. 91 



(The above amounts were entirely on account of services rendered and disbursements paid in 
the calendar year I960. ) 



>. 

o 

E c 

> op 

io5 



23 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



TABLE OF AGGREGATES FOR WILMINGTON 
OF POLLS, PROPERTY AND TAXES, AS ASSESSED 
JANUARY 1, 1961 



Compiled from the figures entered in the Valuation List: 



Number of Persons Assessed: 



Individuals 
16 
3, 958 
163 



On Personal Estate Only 
On Real Estate Only 
On Both Personal and Real Estate 
Total Number of Persons Assessed 
Total Number of Polls Assessed 

Value of Assessed Personal Estate: 
Stock in Trade 
Machinery 
Live stock 

All Other Tangible Personal Property 

Total Value of Assessed Personal Estate 

Value of Assessed Real Estate: 
Land exclusive of Buildings 
Buildings exclusive of Land 

Total Value of Assessed Real Estate 

Total Valuation of Assessed Estate 

Tax Rate per $1, 000 - $67. 00 

Taxes for State, County and Town purposes, including Overlay: 
On Personal Estate 
On Real Estate 
On Polls 

Total Taxes Assessed 

Number of Livestock Assessed: 
Horses (1 yr. old or over) 
Neat Cattle (1 yr. old, or over) 



All 

Other 
38 
139 
27 



General 



Total 
54 
4, 097 
190 
4, 339 
3, 423 



126, 520. 00 
479, 766. 00 
32, 480. 00 
817, 428. 00 

1, 456, 194. 00 



3, 006, 700. 00 
22, 698, 170. 00 

25, 704, 870. 00 

27, 161, 064. 00 



97, 565. 00 
1, 722, 226. 20 
6, 846. 00 

1, 826. 637. 20 

Farm Animals 
Assessed 



Cows (Milch) 


21 


75 


Bulls 0, Oxen 0, Steers 0, Heifers 6 


6 


6 


Swine (6 months old, or over) 


232 


976 


Sheep (6 months old, or over) 


6 





Fowl 


60 


10. 500 


All Other 


123 


1, 075 


Number of Acres of Land Assessed 




10, 340 


Number of Dwelling Houses Assessed 




3, 418 



24 



RECAPITULATION - 



1961 



Total Appropriations (Taxation) 

Total Appropriations (Available Funds) 

Tax Title Foreclosures 

Amount necessary to satisfy final court judgments 
Overlay Deficits (Overdrafts) 
Total Deficits (Abatements) 
Pension Fund 

State Parks and Reservations 
State Audit 

Metropolitan Sewerage 

Metropolitan Sewerage Connection Charge 
County Tax 

Tuberculosis Hospital Assessment 
Overlay 

Gross Amount to be Raised 
Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 



Total Estimated Receipts 

Voted from Available Funds 

Total Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 
Net amount to be raised by taxation 



2, 210, 213. 43 
163, 710. 23 
288. GO 
9, 440. 38 
14, 769. 47 
22, 851. 26 
26, 312. 70 
6, 610. 58 
6, 338. 93 
37, 470. 06 
7, 660. 14 
20, 608. 27 
4, 574. 17 
95, 118. 74 



2, 373, 923. 66 



Income Tax 


173, 613. 


67 


Corporation Taxes 


22, 105. 


78 


Reimbursement Publicly Owned Land 


69. 


35 


Old Age Tax (Meals) 


3, 299. 


69 


Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 


152, 600. 


00 


Licenses 


4, 000. 


00 


Special Assessments 


3, 600. 


00 


General Government 


5, 100. 


00 


Protection of Persons and Property 


4, 200. 


00 


Health and Sanitation 


3, 000. 


00 


Charitie s 


19, 800. 


00 


Old Age Assistance 


37, 800. 


00 


Veteran's Services 


8, 700. 


00 


Schools 


63, 411. 


45 


Librarie s 


900. 


00 


Cemeterie s 


3, 700. 


00 


Interest on Taxes and Assessments 


6, 700. 


00 


State Assistance for School Construction 


100, 123. 


99 


Farm Animal Excise 


195. 


00 


Unclassified 


7, 600. 


00 


Sewer Rental 


15, 000. 


00 



Personal Property 
Real Estate 
Polls 



1, 456, 194 @ 67. 00 per M 
25, 704, 870 @ 67. 00 per M 
3, 423 @ 2. 00 each 



251, 942. 70 
2, 625, 866. 36 



Total Taxes Levied on Polls and Property 



635, 518. 93 

163, 710. 23 
799. 229. 16 
1, 826, 637. 20 

97, 565. 00 
1, 722, 226. 20 
6, 846. 00 

1, 826, 637. 20 



o 

u 

CO «j 

- c 

- c 

5 1 

1? 



Items not Entering into the Determination of the Tax Rate: 
Betterment and Special Assessments added to taxes: 

a. Street Betterments and Interest 

b. Water Betterments and Interest 
Water Liens added to Taxes 

Total 



1,512. 18 
7, 242. 99 
7, 041. 60 
$ 15, 796. 77 



25 



PLANNING BOARD 




General Planning: 



Public Hearing 



Zoning By-law is being reviewed in order to bring it f\illy up to date, 
anticipated in the area of the Police Station during the coming year. 



Master Planning is 



Zoning: 

After considering carefully the recommendations of the planning consultants, the Planning 
Board recommended to the Town Meeting amending the zoning map by increaseing the area of the Northern 
Industrial Zone in order to fully utilize the benefits of the recently completed Routes 93 and 125. The Town 
so voted and is now in a good position to offer additional locations for desirable industry. 

Plot Plans: 



All plans of land to be recorded at the Registry must be signed by the Planning Board either 
as component parts of a subdivision or as plans which do not constitute a subdivision. To determine each 
lot's status requires detailed scrutiny and checking by means of town records and maps. The board pro- 
cesses many such plans each meeting. 

Subdivision: 



Two subdivisions were fully considered after required public hearings. Both were accepted 
after many clarifications and changes had been made. They are Hathaway Acres Extension Part 1 off 
Hathaway Road , and Alderwood Estates off Woburn Street. 

Parks and Recreation: 



The Planning Board, as Board of Park Commissioners, completed many improvements at 
Silver Lake Beach. These included repainting the interior of the bathhouse, enlarging and resurfacing the 
parking area, installing new sanitary facilities, and enlarging and improving the beach area. 

General: 



The Planning Board wishes to acknowledge the full cooperation received from the people of 
the town, all the Boards and Town Officials, and hopes for their continued help during the coming year. 



TOWN ENGINEER 



The work load of the Engineering Department has been increasing every year, and it became 
necessary to augment the force during the summer months when it is most convenient to do the survey work. 
Mr. Eugene Lucier, engineering student from Dartmouth College, was hired for twelve weeks. He worked 
with the two co-operative students from Northeastern University to good advantage. 



It was decided to establish coordinate points in every section of the town to tie-in with the 
Massachusetts Coordinate System, recognized by law under Chapter 47 of the Acts of 1941 amending Chap. 
97 of the General Laws. The surveys made by the state engineers on the new Route 93 were tied to this 
system. Enough coordinate points are available along this Route, to use as starting points on the surveys 
in connection with the Town work. In this manner the system can be extended to take in every part of the 
Town, and refer all bearings to true North, and all points to a common system for the entire state. It is 
believed that this practice will be required by law sometime in the future. It will also facilitate the survey ^ 
work for the Town. 2 

O 

Drainage problems keep coming up and are referred to this department for recommendations ,^ 
and solutions. The surveys performed during the year include: Marcia Road, Lawrence Street, Shady 5 
Lane Drive, Lawrence Court, Ainsworth Road, Silver Lake Beach Area, Dartmouth Road, North Street, ^ 2 

Pleasant Road, River Street, Town-owned watershed North of Route 1Z5 near the North Reading line, and ; C 

Salem Street near the new Intermediate School. ^ ^. 

> Dp 

Bounds were set along the Town line of Wilmington and North Reading between Salem Street and - £ 

the Ipswich River. This line was staked in its proper location, and granite bounds were set at regular ^ 
intervals. Bounds were also set at the intersection of Ainsworth Road and Route 125 ramp, and it is ; 
planned to set bounds as soon as weather permits, on the streets where surveys have been made. • 

Considerable work was done to prepare plans and descriptions of the areas which were rezoned 
for industry along Route 125 in North Wilmington and on Burlington Avenue west of the railroad tracks 
where Guild Plastics is building for a new industry. 

Lines and grades were given to the town crews on the various construction projects whenever 

reque sted. 

The department supervised the erection of the traffic lights at the corner of Burlington Avenue 
and Deming Way. 

The Ferguson Subdivision which includes Woodland Road became active again during the year 
and demanded supervision by the department. 

A new subdivision known as Alderwood Estates between Woburn Street and West Street was 
approved by the Planning Board and Board of Health during the year, and it is expected that construction 
will begin in the near future. 

No gravel operations, except for landscaping purposes, took place during the year. 



27 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



Hearing Date 
(Advertised dates) 
Applicant 

Case #1-61 - 1/3/61 
(12/8/60 & 12/15/60) 
Pineridge Cleaners 

Case #2-61 - 1/3/61 
(12/8/60 & 12/15/60) 
Wilson J. Belbin 



Reason for Appeal 



To install advertising sign on their 
building (owner of property, Johnson's 
Realty Trust) on Middlesex Ave. 

Variance in setback on land at corner 
of Andover Street and Route 125 (owner) 
Robert W. and Barbara J. Belbin 



Member s 
Voting 



Decision 



(LG, BM, PH) Granted 



(LG, BM, PH) 



Granted with 
restrictions 



Case #3-61 - 1/24/61 
(12/29/60 & 1/5/61) 
Woodbine Realty Corp. 

Case #4-61 - 2/7/61 
(1/12/61 & 1/19/61) 
Paul A. Farrell 



Variance to authorize issuance of bldg. 
permit at 332 Lowell Street on land of 
Minot J. Anderson. 

Variance to allow extension of living 
room of Brownell & Amy Malone, 
26 Grant Street, closer to lot line than 
law allows. 



(LG, BM, PH) Withdrawn 



(LG, BM, PH) Granted 



Case #5-61 - 2/14/61 
(1/19/61 & 1/26/61) 
Minot Anderson 



Variance for commercial use of his 
land at junction of Lowell Street and 
Route 93. 



(LG, BM, PH) 



Denied 
(Appealed) 



Case #6-61 - 3/7/61 
(2/9/61 & 2/16/61) 
John J. Ambrose 



Variance for sign on property of 
DeMoulas Realty Co. , Sherwin-Williams 
Co. Store, 240 Main Street 



(LG, BM, PH) Granted 



Case #7-61 - 3/21/61 
(2/23/61 & 3/2/61) 
Herbert Pickering 

Case #8-61 - 4/18/61 
(3/23/61 & 3/30/61) 
McDevitt Nursing Home 

Case #9-61 - 4/18/61 ' 
(3/23/61 & 3/30/61) 
Robert Cady 

Case #10-61 - 4/18./61 
(3/23/61 & 3/30/61 
Harwood Realty Trust 



Right to erect signs on four retail stores (LG, BM, PH) 
at 413 Main Street 



Pending 

Awaiting plans from 
appellant 



Variance to add a utility room to the 
Home at 14 Chestnut Street 



(BM.PH, HC) Granted 



Appeal to transfer a 30' strip of land (BM, PH, HC) Granted 
at 2 1 Dorothy Ave. to an abutting owner. 



Variance in Zoning laws to allow for 
erection of a commercial building at 
corner of Clark and Main Streets 



(BM, PH.HC) Denied 



Case #11-61 - 4/25/61 
(3/30/61 & 4/6/61) 
Thomas McGee 



Right to live in existing dwelling while 
new one is being completed on the same 
lot at 400 Chestnut Street 



(LG, PH, BM) Granted under bond 



Case #12-61 - 4/25/61 
(3/30/61 & 4/6/61) 
Richard G. Usseglio 



Variance to erect garage closer to lot (LG, PH, BM) Granted 
line than the law allows at 98 Park Ave. 



28 



Hearing Date 
(Advertised dates) 
Applicant 

Case #12A-61 - 4/25/61 
(3/30/61 & 4/6/61) 
George Stevens 

Case #13-61 - 4/25/61 
(3/30/61 & 4/6/61) 
John T . Shelley 

Case #14-61 - 5/2/61 
(4/6/61 & 4/13/61) 
Pasquale Castaldo 

Case #15-61 - 5/2/61 
(4/6/61 & 4/13/61) 
Frank Johnson 



Reason for Appeal 



Members 

Voting 



Right to put sign on bmlding at 208 Main (LG, PH, BM) 
Street 



Variance on lots 86, 87 and 88 Beacon 
Street, Wilmington Sq. Park, lots not 
having required depth, frontage or area. 



Decision 

Granted with 
re striction 



(LG, PH, BM) Granted 



Variance to build garage at 26 North St. (LG, BM, PH) Granted 
closer to the lot line than is permitted 
by the zoning by-law. 

Variance to build garage 10 feet from the (LG, PH, BM) Granted 
lot line at 47 West Street 



Case #16-61 - 5/2/61 
(4/6/61 & 4/13/61) 
Joseph & Helen DelTorto 



Case #17-61 - 5/9/61 
(4/13/61 & 4/20/61) 
Roger C. Blake 

Case #18-61 - 5/9/61 
(4/13/61 & 4/20/61) 
Daniel Lyons 

Case #19-61 - 5/16/61 
(4/20/61 & 4/27/61) 
Edward C. Whitney 

Case #20-61 5/23/61 
(4/27/61 & 5/4/61) 
Robert A. Cook 



Variance to build on Lot 29 Patricia 
Circle, lot approved by the Planning 
Board having sufficient area but not 
sufficient frontage. 

Variance to build on lot on Chestnut St. 
not having the required frontage and 
area (owner, Millard Pipes) 

Variance to have narrower side yard 
than permitted in SRA District. 
(Rollins Road) 

For the storage of barrels and lumber 
on lot of land in South Wilmington on 
Woburn Street 



(LG, BM, PH) Granted 



(LG, PH,HC) Denied 



(LG, PH, HC) Granted 



(LG, PH, BM) Granted 



For a sideline variance to erect a home (LG, PH, HC) 
on Lot 10 Christine Drive 



Granted 



Case #21-61 5/23/61 

(4/27/61) 

Francis Linehan 



For right to increase size and front- 
age of existing non- conforming lot on 
Forest Street 



(LG, PH.HC) Denied 



Case #22-61 - 6/13/61 

(5/18/61 & 5/25/61) 

Geo. H. & Virginia Dailey 

Case #23-61 - 6/13/61 
(5/18/61 & 5/25/61) 
Jackson Bros. 



For variance to erect garage 7 1/2 ft. 
nearer to the lot line than the law 
allows at 51 Chestnut Street 

Variance to straighten existing side lot 
lines on four (4) lots on Shaw sheen Ave. 
and Lake Street 



(LG, PH, BM) Granted 



(LG, PH, BM) Granted 



Case #24-61 - 7/11/61 
(6/15/61 & 6/22/61) 
Burton B. Welton 



To erect a dwelling 7 feet closer to 
front line than the law allows, lot 
adjacent to 236 Woburn Street 



(BM.PH.LW) Granted 



29 



Hearing Date 
(Advertised dates) 
Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Members 
Voting Decision 



Case #25-61 - 1 1 \\ I b\ To divide her lot of land into two lots, 

(6/15/61 & 6/22/61) one of which will not have the required 

Marjorie E. Wilson, Admx. area or frontage (19 Shawsheen Ave. ) 



Case #26-61 - 7/11/61 
(6/15/61 & 6/22/61) 
Alphonse Savignac 



Case #27-61 - 7/11/61 
(6/15/61 & 6/22/61) 
Denis P. O'Donoghue 

Case #28-61 - 7/25/61 
(6/29/61 & 7/6/61) 
Samuel Milne 

Case #29-61 - 7/25/61 
(6/29/61 & 7/6/61) 
Walpole Woodworkers, Inc. 

Case #30-61 - 8/10/61 
(7/20/61 & 7/27/61) 
George Tzannos 

Case #31-61 - 8/15/61 
(7/27/61 & 8/3/61) 
Ruth O. Saunders 



To build a dwelling on lot of land near 
Richardson Farm on Woburn Street, 
not conforming to Section V-5 of Zoning 
By-law. 

Variance of 4 feet side yard, to allow 
space to build a garage. (Lawrence 
Street) 

Variance to allow dwelling to be built 
on a lot on Chestnut Street, not having 
required depth or area. 

Variance to legalize open storage at 
234 Lowell Street 



Variance to build garage closer to lot 
line than the law allows. Lot 14 
Marcus Road 

Variance to build porch closer to lot 
line than the law allows at 22 Grant St. 



(BM. PH, LW) Denied 



(BM, PH, LW) Granted 



(BM, PH. LW) No hearing 



(LG, BM, PH) Denied 



(LG, PH, BM) Granted 



(LG, BM, LW) Granted 



(LG, LW,HC) Granted 



Case #32-61 - 8/15/61 
(7/27/61 & 8/3/61) 
John A. Grano 

Case #33-61 - 9/12/61 
(8/17/61 & 8/24/61) 
Douglas C. Saunders, Jr. 

Case #34-61 - 9/12/61 
(8/17/61 & 8/24/61 ) 
Daniel J. & Angela C. 
Walsh 



Variance to divide lot of land at 107 
Aldrich Road into two lots, one with 
insufficient depth. 

Variance to change the use of a variety 
shop at Parker and Lowell Streets to 
a barber shop 

Variance in zoning. Permission to sell 
a house on a lot not conforming to 
Zoning laws, created unknowingly in 
1957, at Canal Street (formerly 
Shawsheen Street) 



(LG, LW.HC) Denied 



(LG, BM, PH) Granted 



(LG, PH, BM) Granted 



Case #35-61 - 9/12/61 
(8/17/61 & 8/24/61) 
AVCO - RAD 



Case #36-61 - 9/19/61 
(8/24/61 & 8/31/61) 
Generosso A. Capodilupo 



Variance to allow for construction of a 
2, 000 ft. parking lot beyond the 30 ft. 
extension of industrial zone, permitted 
by By-law, and for approval of in- 
stallation of a cooling tower and elevator 
pent -house 14 ft. and 3 ft. respectively 
above the permitted height of buildings, 
by Zoning By-law. 

To establish a real estate office at I68 
Main Street in a Residential Zone. 
(Assessors #44/186) 

30 



(LG, BM, PH) Granted 



(LG, PH, BM) Denied 



Hearing Date 
(Advertised dates) 
Applicant 

Case #37-61 - 9/19/61 
(8/24/61 & 8/31/61) 
Russell Shurtleff 



Reason for Appeal 



Members 
Voting 



Variance to provide an apartment for his (LG, PH, BM) 
father, with an outside stairway - at 616 
Woburn Street (Assessors #58/16) 



Decision 



Granted 



Case #38-61 - 9/26/61 
(8/31/61 & 9/7/61) 
Ernest Seitz 



Variance to allow for the erection of a 
garage and breezeway closer to lot line 
than law allows. At 711 Woburn Street. 
(Assessors #48/70) 



(LG, BM, LW) Granted 



Case #39-61 - 9/26/61 
(8/31/61 & 9/7/61) 
AVCO - RAD 



Variance to allow for erection of an 
antenna tower and ramp on Buildings 
3 and 4 for research purposes. At 201 
Lowell Street (Assessors #48/73A) 



(LG, BM, PH) Granted 



Case #40-61 - 9/26/61 
(8/31/61 & 9/7/61) 
Stanley R. White 



Case #41-61 - 10/3/61 
(9/7/61 & 9/14/61) 
Bessie & Myer Cohen 
(Wilm. Grain & Bldg. ) 



Case #42-61 - 10/17/61 
(9/21/61 & 9/28/61) 
John W. & Eva Parsons 



Variance on unoccupied lot of land on 
Taft Road, to erect a single family 
dwelling, the lot having insufficient 
frontage. (Assessor s # 19/57) 

To obtain approval of metal roofing in 
required sideyard as petitioned 5/8/58, 
and permission for extension of shed 
over storage space approved 6/17/57, 
by the Board of Appeals. 409 Main 
Street. (Assessors #42/22C) 

To divide and erect a single family 
dwelling on their property on Boutwell 
Street. (Assessor s # 18/ 12) 



(LG, PH, BM) Denied 



(BM, PH, LW) 



Part granted. Part 
denied. (Appealed) 



(PH, LW,HC) Denied 



- c 

3 

: oa 

- f 

;l 

o5 



Case #43-61 - 10/17/61 
(9/21/61 & 9/28/61) 
Herbert & Gertrude 
Frederick 



Case #44-61 - 10/17/61 
f9/21/6l & 9/28/61) 
Mary Benevento 



Case #45-61 - 10/17/61 
(9/21/61 & 9/28/61) 
George T. K. Smith 



(PH, LW,HC) Denied 



To move a property line on existing lots 
of land at the corner of State and Forest 
Streets so as to make two lots of land 
with proper width but insufficient depth. 
(Assessors #51/30) 



For right to dispose of industrial waste (LW.HC, PH) 
from one factory in existing excavations 
in Benevento gravel pits off Salem Street,, 
N. Wilmington (Assessors #Rl-30) 



To establish real estate office at 284 
Shaw sheen Ave. together with suitable 
signs. (Assessors #22/5) 



No Hearinc 



(PH,LW,HC) Granted 



Case #46-61 - 10/31/61 Variance on land on Faulkner Ave. to (LG, PH, BM) Granted 
(10/5/61 & 10/12/61) set off Lots 129 to 133 Silver Lake 

Lauretta J. Davis Pines Plan as separate lot, said lot 

having required frontage and area but 

not required depth. (Assessors #35/10) 



31 



Hearing Date 
(Advertised dates) 
Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Members 
Voting 



Decision 



Case #47-61 - 10/31/61 
(10/5/61 & 10/12/61) 
Lauretta J. Davis 



Variance to divide land of sufficient area (LG, LW, BM) 
into two housing lots, not having required 
frontage, lots #220 through 226 Silver 
Lake Pines Plan. (Assessors #35/10) 



Granted 



Case #48-61 - 10/31/61 
(10/5/61 & 10/12/61) 
John A. Grano 



Variance on a lot of land at 107 Aldrich (LG, PH, BM) 
Road, to divide into two lots, one having 
insufficient area. (Assessors #20/4) 



Granted 



Case #49-61 - 10/31/61 
(10/5/61 & 10/12/61) 
Albert C. Brun 



Variance to allow him to convert the (LG, PH, BM) 

second floor of building at 106-110 Main 
Street into apartments. (Assess. #45/ 141) 



Granted 



Case #50-61 - 11/7/61 
(10/12/61 & 10/19/61)^ 
Texaco, Inc. 



Variance at 275 Main Street to allow two (LG, PH, BM) 
identification signs in yard, and trade 
mark and company sign on building. 
(Assessors #43/4A) 



Granted - allowing one 
yard sign. 



Case #51-61 - 11/14/61 
(10/19/61 & 10/26/61) 
John H. Sullivan 



Variance on two lots adjacent to his 
home, for building purposes, said lots 
having sufficient frontage and area but 
insufficient depth. 200 Salem Street 
(Assessors #90/142) 



(LG, PH, BM) Granted 



Case #52-61 - 11/14/61 
(10/19/61 & 10/26/61) 
A. P. Rounds 



Case #53-61 - 1 1/28/61 
(11/2/61 & 11/9/61) 
Wilmington Coal & Oil 



Variance to remove gravel, surplus 
material, in the way of two streets to be 
constructed, in Hathaway Acres, North 
Wilmington. (Assessors #94/41E) 

Variance in zoning laws to allow for the 
erection of a 50 ft. radio tower to con- 
tact delivery vehicles (340 Main Street) 
(Assessors #42/29) 



(LG, BM, PH) Granted 



(LG, PH, BM) Granted 



Case #54-61 - 1 1/28/61 
(11/2/61 & 11/9/61) 
Frank J. McGivern 



Case #55-61 - 11/28/61 
(11/2/61 & 11/9/61) 
Jackson Bros. 



Variance in zoning law to allow for the 
erection of a dwelling on lot on Kendall 
Street not having required depth and 
frontage. (Assessors #20/6) 

Variance from Building By-law to sub- 
stitute 60 -minute United Lab Gypsum 
Board for required plaster over heater 
at Lot 36 Lake St. (Assessors #20/18) 



(LG, PH, BM) Granted 



Pending 



Case #56-61 - 12/28/61 
(11/30/61 & 12/7/61) 
Jackson Bros. 



Variance to erect dwelling on Lot 23A 
Lake Street, having sufficient area and 
frontage but insufficient depth. 
(Assessors #22/35) 



(LG, PH, BM) Granted 



32 



Hearing Date 
(Advertised dates) 
Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Member s 
Voting Decision 



Case #57-61 - 12/28/61 
(11/30/61 & 12/7/61) 
C. A. Bigham and 
M. R. Robinson 



Variance to erect dwelling at Concord 
and Woburn Streets closer to the street 
than the law allows, to nneet conditions 
of Health Agent. (Assessors #86/ 18) 



Granted 



Case #58-61 - 12/28/61 
(11/30/61 & 12/7/61) 
John R. & Betty Evans 



Variance to allow for the erection of 
three towers higher than the Zoning 
Law allows. (AVCO tower) 
(Assessors #R2-24) 



(HC.LG, RZ) Granted 



LG - Louis E. Gage, Chairman 

BM - Bruce MacDonald, Secretary 

PH - Parker E. Hodgdon 

LW - Leidy K. Williams 

HC - C. Homer Coursey 

RZ - Robert Zarce 



DOG OFFICER 




Anti-Rabies Clinic 



Dog Licenses 

Kennels 

Dogs Confined 

Complaints Covered 

Dogs Disposed of 

Dogs Killed by Cars 

Resident Calls for Licenses 



1223 



312 
602 
276 
84 
370 



33 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



ARREST 



Assaiilt & Battery 


10 


Larceny 


32 


A. W. O. L. (Military) 


4 


Malicious Damage to Property 


12 


•Being Abroad at Night Time 


1 


Non Support 


16 


Breaking & Entering & Larceny 


14 


Other Departments (on warrants) 


2 


Concealed Weapons 


2 


Pornography 


1 


Contributing to the Delinquency (Minor) 


2 


Rape 


2 


Drunkenness 


80 


Receiving Stolen Property 


1 


Escapees 


2 


Runaways 


12 


Fornication 


1 


State Police Arrest 


8 


Forgery & Uttering 


2 


Suspicious Persons 


32 


Illegitimacy 


2 


Unlawful Riding on Freight Train 


4 


Insane 


4 


Vagrancy 


1 


Indecent Assault (Child under 14) 


1 


Vandalism 


2 


Indecent Exposure 


4 




254 



ARREST FOR MOTOR VEHICLE VIOLATIONS 



Allowing Improper Person to Operate 


3 


Obscuring Number Plates 


1 


Attaching Plates 


3 


Operating So As To Endanger 


8 


Failing to Display Inspection Sticker 


14 


Operating Under the Influence of Liquor 


11 


Failing to Stop on Signal of Officer 


3 


Operating After Suspension of License 


14 


Failing to Stop for School Bus 


3 


Operating Without A License 


8 


Failing to Stop for Red Traffic Signal 


1 


Operating Uninsured Vehicle 


3 


Failing to Stop for "Stop" Sign 


1 


Operating Unregistered Vehicle 


4 


Failing to Keep to the Right of Road 


1 


Speeding 


3 


Leaving the Scene of Accident 


4 


Using Without Authority 


14 
99 



Total arrests for the year number 353. 
Total fines assessed amounted to $1, 690. 00. 

The figures appearing here more than justify a very sincere expression of appreciation to the 
members of the department for a "Job Well Done". 

This has been a very busy year for the department, more than two hundred more arrests this 
year than in I960, and more than $1, 000. 00 paid in fines over that of I960. 

However, arrests made by the department are only one phase of activities involved. Therefore,! 

I am going to list a few other activities that we are concerned with: 



34 



MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS 



All Type Auto Accidents 


160 


Indecent Exposures Reported 


8 


Attempted Suicides 


3 


Indecent Phone Calls 


20 


Automobiles Reported Stolen 


8 


Juvenile Cases (No court action) 


16 


Buildings Broken Into 


44 


Prowlers Reported 


42 


Buildings Found Open 


70 


Runaways Reported 


6 


Children Reported Lost 


12 


Stolen Bicycles 


21 


Complaints Received (Investigated) 


756 


Stolen Cars Recovered (by us) 


12 


Emergency Trips with Cruisers 


33 


Suicides 


1 


Fatal Automobile Accidents 


1 


Sudden Deaths 


8 


Fires Responded To 


22 


Summonses Delivered 


426 



This about covers the activities of the department for 1961, but I would like to remind you that 
there are a lot of domestic problems handled by the department in the course of the year that cannot be in- 
cluded in a report such as this. 

The department was saddened twice in the year 1961 with the death of Harry J. Ainsworth, our 
former beloved Chief of Police, and on the occasion of the death of George H. Fuller, a beloved brother 
Police Officer. It is with a deep sense of profound sympathy that we record the deaths of our departed 
members. May God Bless Them and Forever Keep Them in His Love \ 

Once again my heartfelt thanks to the Traffic Supervisors for a "Job Well Done". What a won- 
derful devotion to duty! 

In concluding the report, may I take this means to express sincere thanks to the Fire Depart- 
ment, Highway Department, Water Department, Tree Department, School Department, Park Department, 
and the "Gang" at the Town Hall, for being so wonderfully cooperative. 

My sincere thanks and appreciation to the Board of Selectmen for their continued support and 
cooperation. 

To "Cecil" Lancaster, Town Manager, my most sincere thanks for all you have done in provid- 
ing the department with the necessary equipment so essential to the department, and for your many other 
contributions to the general welfare of the department. 



5 

- C 

■ c 




Sergeant Ellsworth 





Sergeant Langone 



Sergeant Kelly 



35 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



The Fire Department responded to a. total of seven hundred and forty- seven (747) calls, one 
hundred and seventy-three (173) bell alarms, and five hundred and seventy-four (574) still alarms. 



Ambulance Calls 342 

Auto & Trucks 55 

Bomb Reports 2 

Buildings 41 

Bridge 2 

Brush & Grass 170 

Chimneys 4 



Dumps 9 

Electric Wires 16 

False Alarms 18 

Oil & Gas Burners 28 

Out of Town 2 

R. R. Trains 8 

Service Calls 50 



A total of 33, 575 feet of fire hose was laid. Total value of property endangered was $139, 500. 
The property loss was $24, 479- 60. 

Inspections were made of rest homes, schools, and public buildings, and permits were issued 
as required by State Law. 

With the exception of Engine #5, all equipment is in good condition. Engine #5 is a 1938 
Chevrolet housed at the North Wilmington Pumping Station and is in very poor condition. It should be re- 
placed this year if the North Wilmington Area is to continue to have Underwriters Credit earned by the 
presence of an acceptable apparatus garaged in the area. Also, this was the recommendation of the Board 
of Selectmen as far back as 1957. 

Members of the department installed fire alarm wires in the Shady Lane Drive section, Glen 
Road, Lawrence Street, and Glendale Circle. Six boxes were installed. also. 



36 



RECREATION COMMISSION 



As in the past, the Recreation Commission has designed the programs to meet either directly, 
or indirectly, some of the recreational needs and desires of all the townspeople. 

Programs were as follows this year: 

Summer Program ♦ 

Silver Lake Beach: 

a. Protection of life 

b. Instruction in swimming and water safety g 

5 

Town Park: J 

Softball league for adults - i/j 

Four Playgrounds: : ■< 

Devoted to playground activities for children J o 

; ^ 

• I 

Fall and Winter Program ' 5 
)> 

a. Wednesday nights for men (High School Gym) 

b. Thursday nights for women (High School Gym) 

c. Saturday afternoons for boys (High School Gym) 

d. Saturday afternoons for boys (Glen Road School) 

e. Saturday nights for young men and adults (High School Gym) 

f. Skating Carnival (Assisted by Wilmington Skating Club^ 



With an increase in participation, plans are being considered for the expansion of the present 
program areas so as to include the Boutwell School area and the new Intermediate School area. 



Without the cooperation of the School Committee and the members of the Planning Board, the 
program would not have attained its aims and objectives. To them and to the other town departments, we 
are very grateful. 



Recreation 




Golf Instruction 



37 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 



Building Permits were issued with conservative valuation as follows: 





No. 


Va,l\i3,tion 




Dwellings 


95 


1, 193. 350 




Residential Garages 


15 


19, 750 




Alterations and repairs to 








dwellings 


77 


117, 100 


1, 330, 200 


Industrial Buildings 


11 


2, 480, 500 




Commercial Garages 


1 


28,800 




Gasoline Service Stations 


3 


45, 250 




Sheds, Barns, Etc. 


6 


3, 700 




Signs 


3 


1, 975 




Additions & alterations to non- 








residential 


9 


31, 000 


2, 591, 225 


Schools 


1 


818, 252 




Public Works 


1 


6, 000 


824, 252 


Demolition 


ZO 






Renewals 


22 






Repair s 


7 






TOTALS 


271 




$4, 745, 677 



Please note that the non-residential permits total over twice the value of the ninety-five new 
dwellings. Let me also inform you that AVCO's RAD addition comprises over half of the Industrial total; 
and this without any concessions from acceptable standards. 

Below is a list of the private residential permits of the past few years: 

1956 1957 1958 1959 I960 1961 

148 137 136 110 93 95 

The downward trend in the number of new dwelling permits has leveled off. The past leadership 
of the Planning Board in sponsoring adoption of far-reaching Zoning and Subdivision Regulations has been 
partially nullified by acts of the Legislature "liberalizing" the permitted exemptions from these regulations. 
(It isn't only Boston that wants more "Home Rxile". ) In such cases the Building Inspector must issue a 
permit. 



38 



The i960 Legislation annulled the Town's then-existing gas fitting regulations. When the Town 
complies with Chapter 143, Section 30, by appointing an inspector of gas piping, provisions must be made 
for issuance of permits, a fee schedule authorized, and an appropriation made to defray this expense. 

Report of permit fees received: 

Inspector 

Permits No. Fees Received 
Building Permits 271 1, 1 18. 00 

Plumbing Permits 108 982.00 582.00 

Wiring Permits 415 1, 489- 00 807. 50 

$3, 589. 00 $1, 389. 50 



VETERANS' AGENT ^ 



Arthur Harper 




During 1961 this department processed 182 applications for monetary aid as follows: 
Chapter 115 as amended: 

74 applications were referred to other cities or towns 
30 applications were rejected 

78 applications were approved for aid totaling over $41,000. 00 

This represents an increase in the number of cases handled. This year again shows an in- 
crease in the family budget and the fuel budget under the State program. Of a total of $41, 000 spent, more 
than $10, 000 was paid to hospitals, $6, 000 was paid for doctors and medication, and $20, 000 was paid to 
veterans, or their dependents, who are unable to work because of illness or age limitations. In contrast, 
less than $5, 000 was spent on employable veterans who are temporarily out of work. 

Through the cooperation of the welfare agent and the people of the Wilmington Community Fund, 
this department was able to care for a number of cases which might have otherwise gone without help due 
to being ineligible under the Veterans Benefits Law. With increasing medical, surgical, and hospital 
costs, together with very little if any decrease in case load, it is not anticipated that future expenditures 
will lessen. 



39 



TREE DEPARTMENT 



Tree Department: 

Routine work was carried on throughout the year, such as removing trees, broken limbs, 
cutting away broken tops, and trimming low limbs. Twenty-five trees were cut down for street widening, 
and the brush was taken to the dump and burned. The shade trees were sprayed three times this year. 
Next year they will need much additional spraying particularly our maple trees which are being attacked by 
dieback and decline. 

Also this year, we trimmed the fire alarm system which cut down considerably on short circuits 
and false alarms. Several streets remain to be trimmed, and the v/ork will be completed this year. Our 
usual program of tree feeding was carried out this year - about fifty trees were treated in this manner. 

Our annual Christmas tree, donated by the late Herbert C. Barrows, was planted permanently 
this year under the direct supervision of the Tree Warden and his men. It was decorated by this depart- 
ment with various colored lights and received many favorable comments from the people of Wilmington and 
our neighbors in surrounding towns. 

Moth Department: 

This year we sprayed all the shade trees with 6% and 12% D. D. T. for gypsy moth, tent cater- 
pillars, fall web worms, aphids, pine shoot moth, oak blights, maple leaf spot and dieback. We found a 
few gypsy moth nests in various parts of the town. There were also nests of tent caterpillars. We have 
painted all of the egg clusters with creosote. We have sprayed all the front lawns with 6% D. D. T. for 
Japanese Beetle and milky disease. 

Elm Leaf Beetle and Dutch Elm Disease: 

All elms were sprayed four times with D. D. T. The spraying season started in April and 
continued into August. This year we lost 68 trees due to the Dutch Elm Disease. One hundred and four 
samples were sent to Amherst State College to be tested, and sixty-six came back with Dutch Elm Disease. 
We have cut down well over forty extremely large elms on roadsides and on private property. At various 
times we have been helped by the State tree workers and the Town of Wilmington Highway Department. 
These trees were hauled to the dump and burned. The State furnished truck, men, and equipment for 
three weeks at no cost to the town. We removed one hundred and four stumps also. We cut trees and 
trimmed branches in the Cemetery at the request of Mr. F. Downs. We have started a tree planting 
program to replace trees which have been removed for reasons of tree disease. 

Mosquitoes: 

This year we sprayed the swamps, bog holes, and around homes as far as possible. We also 
used "toss its" in the swampy areas. These are little gelatin bombs which dissolve in the water releasing 
chemicals which kill the larvae of the mosquitoes. They are not harmful to fish or wildlife. In the latter 
part of January 1962 while they are still covered with ice, the swampy areas will be dusted with a powdered 
chemical to help kill the larvae as it thaws out in the spring - no harm to humans, animals, or wildlife. 



40 



Poison Ivy: 



Streets, stone walls and homes, where poison ivy was found, were sprayed with brush killer. 
Also, we sprayed along the roadside to kill brush. 

Town Forest: 

This year we cut down quite a bit of underbrush, broken limbs, and dead trees. 




i2 

Rotonist Sprayer ' £ 





WATER & SEWER DEPARTMENT 



Water Supply: 

With the new well field and pximping station at Chestnut Street in operation by the summer of 
1962, the supply of water will be as follows: 

Station Gals, per Day 

Brown's Crossing 1,500,000 

Barrow's 1,000,000 

Chestnut Street 1, 000, 000 

Total 3,500,000 

However, \intil a connecting main from the new Chestnut Street station to Main Street is in- 
stalled, the available supply from the Chestnut Street well field will be approximately 10% of its capacity. 

Detailed Pumping Statistics are set forth below 

1957 1958 1959 I960 1961 

Maximum gallons 

pumped per Day 1,800,500 1,850,600 2,089,100 2,246,300 2,355,000 
Maximum gallons 

pumped per Week 11,784,000 9,731,500 14,116,700 13,213,000 15,850,600 
Maximum gallons 

pvimped per Month 44,339.000 38,549,000 56,948,300 48,168,900 59.703,400 
Average gallons 

piimped per Day 979,750 1,081,700 1,590,785 1,420,000 1,546,243 
Average gallons 

pumped per Month 29,800,825 32,902,000 48,386,422 43,278,200 47,031,558 
Total gallons 

pumped per Year 357,609.900 394,824,800 580,637,300 519,387.200 564,378,700 



Sewer: 

Connection was made with M. D. C. sewer on August 10, 1961 with a 15-inch pipe. This line 
runs by gravity directly to Deer Island. Two sewer connections were made on Woburn Street:- Webtex 
Company and Ritter Trucking Company. 



42 



Water Main Extensions: 



The following installations were made: 

Street 8" Main 6" Main 



Under the Betterment Lawrence Street 972' 

Program Ainsworth Road 1,403' 

By Builders and Woodland Road 200' 

Developers Lake Street 418' 

In addition, the department laid 1,283 feet of 12-inch main at the Chestnut Street well field, and 
200 feet of 12-inch main in the relocation of Middlesex Avenue in North Wilmington. 



Miscellaneous Information: 



Metered Services 3,000 

Unmetered Services 59 

T otal 3, 059 

New Hydrants Installed 5 

New Services Installed 128 

New Meters Installed 131 



Fluoride used at both Brown's Crossing and Barrows 8, 153 lbs. total 




New Back-hoe (Water Dept.) 



43 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 



During 1961 we were able to develop a new section which is to be used for two grave lots. In the 
same area is a portion of land which has been landscaped and is ready for seeding in the spring of "62". 
This will be an addition to the single grave section. Another strip of ground located near Section E was 
raised to a level and reloamed so as to be seeded in the coming year. This area will be divided into family 
lots. In 1962 there will be more acreage cleared and graded for immediate landscaping. 

The hot topping program was continued this year. Thirty-five hundred dollars worth of topping 
was used, completing avenues in Sections A, B, C, and D - including the new section and the parking lot in 
front of the cemetery building. 

Due to the rapid growth in population during the past several years, there has been a definite 
increase in the amount of routine work carried on by our department. The increasing number of burials 
has necessitated the addition of more area, thus creating a situation calling for additional manpower and 
machinery. Two tons of lime were distributed on the remaining forty percent of the ground which was not 
covered last year, and five tons of 10-6-4 fertilizer was spread over the cemetery land which we keep mowed 

A new Locke Triplex seventy-five inch powered mower was purchased this year. A low-bed 
trailer was also bought to transport our machinery from the cemetery to other locations in town which we 
also maintain. 



Wilmington residents died in Wilmington 21 

Wilmington residents died elsewhere 29 

Non-residents 47 

Baby interments 14 

Cremations 2 

Transfers - babies 2 

Transfers - cremations 2 

Othe r s 2 



119 

Included in the duties of our department is the care and upkeep of the parks and school grounds. 
Parks: 

The small parks around town were kept mowed, trimmed, and flowers were planted for Memorial 
Day. These parks consist of: Drew Square at West and Lowell Streets, Berrigan Square at South Main 
Street, Nee Park at the corner of Burlington Avenue - Chestnut & Marion Streets; Rogers Park on Middle- 
sex Avenue at Glen Road, and Reagan Park which was moved to Harriman's intersection in North Wilmington. 

The Town Park was mowed, and the ball diamond kept in shape for activity throughout the 
summer months. The park is used almost every day during the summer - the Town Softball League utilizing 
it on week nights, and various groups and organizations having acitivities on holidays and weekends. 

The Town Common received two applications of fertilizer, and necessary watering was done in 
addition to regular maintenance. 

Many man hours were allocated to the betterment of the Silver Lake Beach Area. 



44 



Schools: 

Although not included under the cemetery commissioners, the upkeep of our vast area of school 
gro\inds is included among the cemetery department's duties. 



One of our main projects of 1961 was the renovation of the area surrounding the Center and 
Swain Schools. Hot topping showed a tremendous improvement and new lawns added the finishing touch. 



At the conclusion of my report, I would like to thank the Town Manager and other town officials 
for their assistance. I would also like to express my appreciation to all other departments for their co- 
operation and the use of various equipment which was helpful to the efficient operation of our department. 




Francis Downs with new Lawn Mower 




School Maintenance Dept. 
Repairing Center School 



45 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



A review of the activity of the Public Library during 1961 reveals the ever-growing demand for 
library services. We are proud to report that four thousand (4,000) people are registered as active bor- 
rowers. This represents approximately 30% of the town's population and library authorities consider that 
25% is higher than the average. Book circulation has grown 20% from 42, 300 in I960 to 50, 900. 

To meet the obvious need, we are planning to add to the Library staff next year and to make the 
Library available ten more hours a week. 

As a result of a State grant for Public Libraries, the library received $814. 75 in addition to the 
original appropriation voted by the town. This extra money was used primarily to purchase books. 

A fresh coat of paint improved the exterior appearance of the library last year. An emergency 
door was added in the rear of the building, and the heater room was renovated in accordance with safety 
regulations . 



The State Regional Library Center in North Reading continued its fine Bookmobile service for 
which we are most appreciative. It is of invaluable aid in serving people who live some distance from the 
library. 



A pleasant innovation was the Open House held at the library on Sunday, April 16, by the Friend 
of the Wilmington Public Library, to celebrate National Library Week. For this occasion, a very interest 
ing and attractive exhibit of paintings was loaned by Mr. Everett P. Gager. In November, the Friends 
again conducted their Book Fair which is now looked forward to as an annual event. 



We wish to congratulate our Librarian, Mrs. C. Chipman, who spent her vacation completing 
several more library courses at the University of New Hampshire. 




46 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT 



Books added to the Library 1, 881 

Encyclopedia of Science & Technology 15 vols. 

Dictionary of American Biography 11 vols 

Grove's Dictionary of Music 10 vols. 

Records added: Single 53 

Albums 3 

Books circulated: Library 50,927 

Bookmobile 4,991 

Records circulated 1,274 

Periodicals circulated 1,026 
Fines collected $1,088.35 

New Borrowers (making approximately 4, 000 848 
active borrowers) 



During 1961 the increase in circulation of books, periodicals, and records at the library was 
8,769. There was a slight decrease in circulation at the Bookmobile due in part to a change in schedule 
and to sickness of a member of the staff. 

A large registration for the Story Hour necessitated dividing the group into two sections, each 
meeting on alternate Wednesdays. Thanks are due Mrs. Carl Butler and Mrs. Bruce MacDonald who so 
ably assisted in carrying on this service to the pre-school children. 

The library is constantly adding to the reference collection in order to provide a good working 
group of reference sources to meet the most common informational needs of the public. Many books have 
been added to the history, literature, and science sections. The library has material in most fields, but 
it is not possible to fill all the requests of large number of students. 

The need for additional material has been met in part by borrowing from the Division of Library 
Extension and other libraries. Insufficient space is the greatest obstacle to more efficient service. The 
accelerated program in the schools has brought many more students from both Elementary and High Schools 
to the library, thus greatly increasing the work of the reference department. 

It is not feasible to have book deposits in the elementary schools. This need has been partly 
met by teachers from the outlying schools coming to the library and selecting books for their classes. 
Classes from the nearby schools have come regularly to the library. One small collection was sent to the 
Mildred Rogers School. 



47 



JURY LIST 



I 



(Revised - August 31, 1961) 



Name 


Residence 


Occupation 


Abate , Louis A. 


37 Glen Road 


Grounds Keeper 


Ahern, Donald A. 


17 King Street 


Electronic Technician 


Ainsworth, Lillian 


15 Canal Street 


At home 


=''Altman, Sadie K. 


77 Church Street 


Housewife 


^Andersen, Dorothy R. 


Park Street 


Housewife 


*App, Margaret M. 


855 Main Street 


Housewife 


Ardolino, Ernest E. 


Broad Street 


Supervisor 


=!=Babine, Helen V. 


56 High Street 


Asst. Cook 


Bates, Donald A. 


7 Drury Lane 


Technical Writer 


Belbin, Lloyd W. 


6 Morse Avenue 


Telephone Repairman 


''=Berry, Alice T . 


97 Nichols Street 


Housewife 


=''Bertwell, Florence E. 


343 Chestnut Street 


Housewife 


'•'Black, Pauline 


84 Church Street 


Housewife 


Blake, Arnold C. 


90 Middlesex Avenue 


Professional Engineer 


Blake slee, William R. 


10 Hathaway Road 


Foreman 


Bromander, Sidney J. 


1 Hilltop Road 


Machini st 


Buck, Mildred H. 


295 Woburn Street 


Asst. Sales Dept. 


Buckle, Thomas G. 


80 Church Street 


Clerk 


*Burke, Dorothy A. 


10 Westdale Avenue 


Telephone Operator 


*Butt, Mabel 


6 West Street 


Housewife 


Camber, G. Earle 


410 Chestnut Street 


Maintenance Machinist 


*Carnes, Leonora 


512 Woburn Street 


Supervisor 


Carter, John E. 


15 Railroad Avenue 


Stockman 


Churchill, Donald B. 


9 Lawrence Court 


Laboratory Testman 


Connelly, John C. 


12 Westdale Avenue 


Pipefitter 


Crawford, Ralph M. 


3 Chase Road 


P. B. X. Installer 


Doo, Burton 


16 Lawrence Court 


Supervisor 


-'-Darling, Dorothy E. 


124 Eames Street 


Housewife 


Davis, Lauretta J. 


23 Jones Avenue 


Housekeeping 


*Dawe, Marguerite M. 


39 Columbia Street 


Asst. teacher 


Doucette, Henry O. 


31 Ballardvale Street 


Retired 


Downing, Ernest H. 


9 Adams Street 


Shipwright 


Duffy, James F. 


17 Oakridge Circle 


Senior Engineer 


Durkee James J. 


500 Salem Street 


Pharmaci st 


*Dyas, Marjorie L. 


41B Lake Street 


Senior Clerk 


Faulkner, Cora E. 


224 Shawsheen Avenue 


Packer 


'■'Fenlon, Beatrice E. 


47 Burnap Street 


Telephone operator 


Fielding, Doris M. 


111 West Street 


At home 


Foley, Philip M. 


Westdale Avenue 


Marine Pipefitter 


*Ga skill, Kathleen M. 


17 Beacon Street 


Housewife 


Graham, Ernest M. 


49 Lawrence Street 


Project Engineer 


=!=Gratcyk, Ruth M. 


34 Grove Avenue 


Secretary 


-Hartnett, Mary T . 


1 1 1 Woburn Street 


Housewife 


Hodgdon, Parker E. 


7 Harris Street 


Asst. Engineer 


Ingram, Athlea E. 


9 Wing Road 


Technician 


Johnson, Frank W. Jr. 


47 West Street 


Repairman 


-■'Johnson, Mary J. 


Bellevue Avenue 


Sewer 


Kavanaugh, Paul W . 


14 Kelley Road 


General Accountant 


Keane, Richard E. 


6 North Street 


Inside Sales 



48 



Name 


Re sidenCe 


Occupation 


Keen, William J. 


Westdale Avenue 


Insurance Unde r w r it e r 


Kleynen, Louis L. Jr. 


288 Salem Street 


R on t p ^ OT* p m a n 

XV^LXLV^ X \J L. CXXXO.XX 


Krey, Matthias R. 


54 Andover Street 


Prodiif^t Fncinpf^T* 

X X \J vx VXVv \, *~i XXt^XXXV^V^ X 


LaDow Che ste r F . 


3 Ledgewood Road 


X LLxx X U X C X 


T-jiffin Aiihi-ev L 


1 1 VpT^AnHs Avf mie 


3 1 n4"^nan/^^ 
XVXClXiXtC XldlX^ c 




1 1 Hi ah Street 

XX XXXt^li yJLXCCl. 


I-j X 1 ^ X X 1 C 1 11 d 1 1 


XJ CLllU'C X O J X^CL V X VJ. X . 


Q8 Clark Street 


irf* n^T^al TnciiT*an/^^ Arr^nfr 
VJC IXC XCLX XlXoLIX CLXXL. CIX t 


T ,o -nT-ip -p Tnhn 

J_J CX LJ f-' V X , KJi J- A I. • 


4-* W V_J X ^ X X CLX \^ XX X ^ 


T" a T i" G m a n 

L dXLoIXXcLXX 


' 1 ^ CL XvXV^V^f i.VX CX X 1 KJ XXV.. X-^ • 


\J ^ V./X X\„ \J X U 1.J L X ^ v^ l> 


X c 1 y 


1 ' O. LXLZj, VT XXXX CL 1 X i. ■ 


7 Kellev Road 

1 x^^xx^y x\ \JCL vx 


Via ni r" a 1 "P^n a\ n**f*T*inor 

XV1,C ^ Xldl XX dX. X-j 1 X^ X XXC7 C X XXXk 


1 ^ CL W X ^ X f IT CL X v^ X 1 • 


1 ^ .Swa in o;^ H 

X _V W d XXX XV V^CL vX 


^^T* r\y^ ^ r'\\T\ \ c\ an 

X 1 t_IJ X. CV^XXXXXi-XdXX 


T \x/ T* n f ^ Ti r^Yip" y f T-T 

1 * CL W X^llV^^j X\ ' X 1- X -i ■ 


1 1 TjinHpi T^ OP H 

X X X^XXlvXCL XvV^CLVX 


Clerk 


Leavitt Kenneth R . 


4 1 Pie a sant St r eet 


a 1 Q m a n 

CL X C O 1 X X CL XX 


LeGlanc, Edgar 


6 Parker Street 


A'rt'iQt T^TPi ft ;^ n 

XX. X L X ^ l—r X CLX L X X X CLX X 


A^^WILCLX VX J X ILWIXXCLO X • X • 


7 PaiT*"fif*lH TR op^ H 

1 X. CLX X X X C X VX X\ \,/CLvX 


"Pt" oHnr't'1 on a nn i n or 

X^ X U vX L X \JIX X XdlXXXXxXg 


Lister Gordon K. 


Z 7 W^ obur n St r e e t 


SlTOI^TVI QOT" 
\J VX i-'C X V X O v-' X 


Klack , Henry S . 


G Hathaway Road 


o — ottIi nafinof n o i n a t 

\_« V_/ V_/ X VXX X XCL L X XX J—' X X X X XC v^ X 


l^ac F e e ley , A-ngu s B . 


77 Bur nap St r e e t 


.Shppf K4ftal Ac;c;pmhlv 

X xv^ c L XVX c L CLX XX. o ov^xxxu/xy 


I^ac Feeley, Patricia A.. 


7 7 Bur nap St r e e t 


X— J V^ 1;: CLX t_/ V^ V> X V^ L CL X y 


^lagee , William F. 


402 Chestnut Street 


Builde r 


I^an son , Spur ge on D . Jr. 


494 Woburn Street 


pToHnpfi on F ot* f*m 7\ x\ 

X X W vx vx V^ L X V^XX X V^ X \^XXXCLXX 


leaser, Harold R. 


100 Clark Street 


Offset pr e s snnan 


K^a.vo Elf^Pnm* W 

lAvxcfc y \j f J— • x^ CLii.\j X 11 . 


1 "^i m r* T* f* qI" Av^mip 

X \J LXXXV^ L OL XX. V v!^ X X LX v^ 


C^. 1 a i m a Of #^ n t 

XdXXXX dtdClXL 


XVX V« N_> X LX X f X \ CL y 1 X X X X \^ . 


QQ Chestnut Street 

/ / Va^ XX V^ O L X X VXL L X V^ ^ L 


T~)a ta or'RQQinof AnalvQl" 

XVCLLCL X X V,/V^ w O O X X X XxXXCLX y 


l^cCormick W^illiam J . 


Kilnrianock Street 


Welder 


I^c De r mott R i c ha r d E . 


1 A r lene Ave nue 


Journeyman Cable Splicer 


I^cLellan, George H. Jr. 


13 Ferguson Road 


Pfoipf^t FncxinppT 

X X 1 VI- V— . L. X — < XXe^XXXC V^ X 


^^^f Lp 1 1 Pi n TjiTrlvrif^ R 

XVX V- i ^ X X CL XX, X— 1 LX X X y 1 X J / , 


T ^ ^f^TornQOTi R oa H 

X ^ X. ^ X LX \J 1 X XV WCL <ul 


T-T on Q P\X7 T TP 
X X i_i o W X X c 


Kf a Vi on o1 p T 

XVX V> XVX CLXX X , V X X CL tJ . 


1 S FloTaHalp Avpmif* 

i. ~f X. X W X CL VXCLX ^ XL V w XX IXC 


T-T on Q p \x/i f p 

X X \j vx O C W X X 


^^elanson Robert L. 


Fairview A. venue 


Brick Layer 


Metcalfe, Paul T . 


30 B r entw ood A.ve nue 


Sheet Metal Worker 


* \A 1 1 1 Q ^ 1 n r* n T*^. 

JLVX XXXO, X Xl-JXC^lil^C 1~J . 


T T L. VXCLX V-. .XI. V ^ XX IX ^ 


T-Ton <ipwi ff* 

X X \J vx O VV X X c 


^AnciT'^ T Vi rim a q T-T 

XVX \J\J L ^ f X LIKJILICLO XX. 


1 4- ("ri m H p T" ci on R oa H 

X \^ kxx xvxc X wxx xv vy o> vx 


V./ Jl X C V,' x\. C X 


\A ar^y c Allan 


AAA f^Qt"Hal*^ A\/^mi^ 

T» C OLU,CLXC xXVCllUC 


Pkc c onntpi nt 

XX v^ v./ VXX X L CLX X L 


XVX X ^ O , XVX X X U X Vw- v^i 


W^estdale Avenue 


Hou se wif e 


* \A r* Q p V \7" f» 1 \m R 
XVX \j y f x_j V c X y 1 1 j — ' . 


1 1 Lawfpnpf* .StTPPt 

X X X — J CL VV X XX V^ kw/ L X ^ C L 


Hou se wif e 


XVX U.X y , -L X cLiXK^ X o J — J , 


7 C^. 7\f^ on A vf^ n n P 

1 CL X \J\. X XX. V C X X IX 


BiiilHino" di stodi ;m 

XV VXX X VXX '^'L K VX ^ l> Vi/ VXXCLXX 


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124 We«;t Street 

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Retired 


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ZZ Oakdale Road 


Senior Electronics Tech. 


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*Pike Emma D 


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Housewife 


Pills, Alexander T. 


310 Lowell Street 


Supervisor 


Piatt, Alanson E. 


Woburn Street 


Asst. Civil Engineer 


Quinn, George F. 


34 Brentwood Avenue 


Salesman 


Rees, John F. 


34 Andover Street 


I. B. M. 


Reynolds, Helen M. 


833 Woburn Street 


Payroll Clerk 


*Riley, Veronica A. 


Z Cottage Street 


Housewife 


Richard, Lydia 


Taft Road 


Housewife 


Ring, John S. 


Z77 Middlesex Avenue 


Welder 



(* Indicates married woman) 



49 



Name 



Re sidence 



Occupation 



^Seddon, Dorothy I. 
*Shanniak, Mabel M. 
*Sidelinker, Eva 

Skoglund, Mary G. 

Stowe, Ernest B. 

Sullivan, Edward J. 

Sutton, Theodore 

Syvertson, Roy C. Jr. 

Tuttle, Frank H. 

Visconti, Anna M. 

Walsh, Michael J. 

Webber, George J. 

Waugh, John J. 

Webster, George L. 

Whalen, Jannes J. 
*Whitmarsh, Beulah M. 

Wicks, Lydia G. 

Witherspoon, William E. 
*Worby, Mary A. 
^{Indicates married woman) 



40 Oakdale Road 
109 West Street 
72 Main Street 
14 Suncrest Avenue 

3 Meadow Lane 
38 Grove Avenue 

4 Sewell Road 

211 Wildwood Street 
Carson Avenue 
22 Nassau Avenue 

5 Dorothy Ave. 

160 Shawsheen Ave. 
36 Lowell Street 
52 Andover Street 
Birchwood Road 
3 Longview Road 
27 Parker Street 
17 Swain Road 
316 Middlesex Avenue 



Practical Nurse 

Accts. Rec. Bookkeeper 

Shoe Packer 

Siwtchboard Operator 

Campaign Organizer 

Newspaper Correspondent 

Car Unloader & Whse. Mgr. 

Sheet Metal Mechanic 

Senior Design Checker 

Claim Clerk 

Electrician 

Equip. Planning Engineer 
Sales 

Printing Salesman 

Supervisor 

Housewife 

Transistor Tester 

Retired 

Rating Dept. 




Walter F. Coleman, Director 
Public Welfare 



50 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 



The Wilmington Board of Public Welfare respectfully submits its Annual Report for the year 
1961. The Board consists of Mr. Maurice O'Neil, Chairman, Miss Florence Balkus and Mrs. Anna Low. 
Mrs. Low was reappointed by the Town Manager on December 31, 1961 for an indefinite term. 

The three employees of the Wilmington Board of Public Welfare are Walter F. Coleman, the 
Director of Public Assistance, who also serves as secretary to the Board, Mrs. Miriam Sullivan is the 
Senior Clerk and Stenographer and Miss Helen Hobson is the Social Worker. Walter F. Coleman, who was 
appointed on a provisional basis November 7, I960, received a permanent appointment under Civil Service 
November 2, 1961. This permanent appointment was the result of a competitive Civil Service examination, 
the establishment of a list by the Massachusetts Civil Service Commission, and the resultant appointment 
of the top name on the list. 

The .categories of assistance supervised by the Board are as follows: General Relief. Aid to 
Dependent Children, Disability Assistance, Old Age Assistance and Medical Assistance for theAged. The 
last fpur categories are part of the Social Security Act and entitles each community to Federal and State re- 
imbursements for the greater part of the aid rendered under these programs. Each of the above four- 
mentioned categories was born during successive administrations since the great depression, and became 
part of the Welfare program due to the ever changing conditions in our highly industrialized and urbanized 
society and to the problems born of congestion and socio-economic influence. Indoor relief, or what is now 
called General Relief, has gradually given way to the categorical assistance programs under the Social 
Security Act and Federal participation through the grant-in-aid device. The preservation of human dignity, 
the maintenance of family units and social rehabilitation constitute the underlying philosophy of modern 
public assistance. 

Social problems do not disappear under the shield of wishful thinking, nor are they eliminated 
t by the criticism of a few isolated individuals ignorant of the causes of social problems; indeed, as long as 
man inherits the earth they will be with us. To insure a broader dissemination of knowledge, more adapt- 
able programs and effective administrative techniques, various Welfare Conferences and Workshops are 
I held each year for the Administrators and Social Workers of the local Boards. Public Welfare Boards have 
always been and probably will be for some time in the future, the focal point of controversy and criticism. 
Some people are even critical of our fine schools. The following four points might better illustrate Public 
! Assistance today: 

1. Public Assistance today has new dimensions of size and visibility. 

2. Public Assistance still faces the same old perplexing problems of whom shall we help, 
how shall we help them, and who shall do the helping. 

3. Public Assistance as we know it is a more successful, more satisfactory means of 
meeting the needs of the poor than the workhouse, or the beggars' bowl, or the 
medieval monastery. 

4. Implicit in the above is the supposition that public assistance is an instrument of 
society which is capable of still further refinement and improvements. 

The above four points were copied from a report of the 1961 Public Welfare Workshop held at 
the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass. on August 9-11, 1961. "Point three" of course might 
be a cause of conjecture, which says, in effect, public assistance is doing a good job; and "point four", 
which says public assistance can do a still better job. 

This Board in 1961 lived within its appropriation and in fact returned some of its appropriation 
to the Town. Please refer to the Town Accountant's report for the exact amount returned. The Board this 
past year (1961) also recovered a much larger amount of monies from fathers of children who are on our 
Aid to Dependent Children program. This was due to a more diligent effort to search out these fathers 



51 



and bring them before the Courts. Some were tried in the Woburn and Lowell District Courts, some in the 
Superior Court, East Cambridge, the Probate Court, while still others were tried in various courts through 
out the nation. The Federal Reciprocal Support Law, whereby parents can be tried for non- support outside 
of the Commonwealth, will be shown in more detail under the heading of Aid to Dependent Children, in 
addition to comparative recovery receipts for I960 and 1961. 

A more detailed explanation will also be given of each category under its proper heading. This 
Board believes that the taxpayers of Wilmington should have and are entitled to a complete explanation of 
each category under its jurisdiction. It is also believed that this type of publicity is good for the Board of 
Public Welfare. Knowledge of its functions in detail by the public, should lessen to some degree any 
criticism of the department in the future. The year 1961 was also no exception to other years regarding 
changes in the Welfare Laws. Changes liberalizing the Aid to Dependent Children, Old Age Assistance, 
Medical Assistance for the Aged and Disability Assistance categories were voted by Congress and these 
changes will be listed under each categorical heading. 

Old Age Assistance: 

This category is a Federally sponsored, State plan, administered by law through the local 
Boards of Public Welfare. The law requires local Boards to aid aged persons sixty-five and over who are 
in need, and who have resided in Massachusetts for three years of the last nine years prior to application, 
with the last year continuous. Need is determined by applying budgetary standards set up by the State 
Department of Public Welfare. Some other requirements are personal property, such as cash, savings, 
bonds, etc. not to exceed $500. 00. Liens are placed on property if the applicant has an interest in such 
property. 

The Federal government reimburses local boards $49. 80 a month for each case aided. The 
State pays two-thirds of the balance, and the remainder is paid by the local community and charged to the 
town or city of settlement. Five years' continuous residence in a community without public aid constitutes 
a settlement. In the event a person does not have five consecutive years' residence in a town without aid, 
the State is billed for the balance. The Board, in its budget request, does not include the Federal share, 
as this amount by law is set up in a separate account and can be used only by the Board of Public Welfare 
for the Old Age Assistance category. The Board, in its budget request, must raise the State and other 
cities and towns share, as this amount is returned directly to the excess and deficiency fund of the town 
and is used by the town. The assessors, however, anticipate this reimbursement based on the reimburse- 
ments of prior years, and it does not adversely affect the tax rate. 

In the past year a law which most affected Old Age Assistance was Chapter 127 of the Acts of 
1961, whereby citizenship and the additional residence requirement for non-citizens were removed as 
eligibility factors. ' 

During the past year, 86 cases were aided under this program at a cost of $66,919. 34. 

Recoveries received this past year due to sale of property and other reasons amounted to $16, 116. 62. . 

1 
J 

Aid to Dependent Children: 

Aid to Dependent Children is another federally - sponsored category administered by law through 
the local Boards of Public Welfare to aid children that are deprived of parental support through desertion, 
mutual or legal separation, divorce, incarceration, death, disability or unemployment of the parent. 

Major change for this category during the past year was an amendment to Chapter 118 of the 
General Laws, whereby children deprived of parental support due to unemployment were included. The 
waiting period for recipients under this program was also eliminated. Prior to this year a parent had to 
be disabled or incarcerated for a period of over three months, and a six-months ' waiting period was requirej 
for children deprived of parental support due to desertion or mutual separation. 

The Federal reimbursement on this program is $20. 50 per child; State reimbursement is one- 
third of the total expenditure. The local community pays the balance for the aid rendered. The Board does 

52 



not include the Federal share in its budget request. The town must raise the State share and the local 
share, because the State's share is returned to the town's excess and deficiency fund. There is no 
settlement required on this program. However, the children must have resided in the Commonwealth for 
one year prior to application. 

During 1961 members of this department appeared in various courts a total of thirty-two times 
and were 90% successful in these appearances against delinquent fathers by receiving court orders for 
support of their wives and children. Receipts from this source amounted to $3, 692. 05 for 1961, an in- 
crease of 56% over I960. 

During 1961 thirty families were aided under this category in Wilmington with an expenditure 
of $36, 796. 71. 

Disability Assistance: 

Disability Assistance is another federally- sponsored State plan administered by law by the 
local Boards of Public Welfare. It requires the local Boards to aid persons who have been declared per- 
manently and totally disabled by the Medical Review Team of the State Department of Public Welfare and 
who are in need. Need is determined by budgetary standards set by the State Department of Public Welfare. 
The federal reimbursement for money expended in this category is $42. 30 a month per case, and the town's 
share is 25% of the total cost each month. The balance is reimbursed by the State Department of Public 
Welfare. The same manner of financing is used as in Old Age Assistance and Aid to Dependent Children. 
There were no major changes on this program during 1961 from the Federal or State levels. 

During the year 1961, eleven cases were aided on this category. Total expenditure for 1961 
on this program was $11,881. 00 

Medical Assistance for the Aged: 

This category, though still in its infancy, appears that it might be more costly eventually than 
Old Age Assistance. It has exceeded in expenditures Old Age Assistance on some payrolls this past year. 
However, the Old Age Assistance program decreased sufficiently in 1961 to offset any great budget increase 
for 1962. 

Medical Assistance for the Aged is also a federally- sponsored State plan administered by law 
by the local Boards of Public Welfare. This program was born in I960 when changes made under the Social 
Security Act established this category under the Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare. The bill, as 
passed at that level, recognized a need for medical care for aged persons. It, as in other Federal and 
State programs, requires local Boards to aid persons over 65, who are medically indigent and reside in 
the Commonwealth. No settlement is required under this category. 

Under Chapter 781 of the Acts of I960 the other requirements, briefly, are as follows: Aged 
persons 65 or over, who reside in the Commonwealth, are entitled to medical assistance, provided they 
do not have an income if single of more than $150. 00 a month, or if married, $225 a month; and providing 
further that, if single, they do not have bank deposits, securities, cash on hand and/or similar assets 
amounting to more than $2,000. or, if married, more than $3,000. Persons eligible for this form of 
assistance shall be entitled to part or all of the cost of (1) in-patient hospital ward care; (2) public medical 
institution services; (3) nursing home care; (4)physician's services; (5) out-patient or clinical services; 
(6) nursing services; (7) physical therapy and related services; (8) dental services; (9) home health care 
services; (10) laboratory and x-ray services; (11) prescribed drugs, eye glasses, dentures and other pro- 
sthetic devices; (12) diagnostic screening and preventative services; (13) any other care or remedial care 
recognized under the law of the Commonwealth; and (14^ other medical care in accordance with the Depart- 
ment of Public Welfare Medical Care Plan. 

Reimbursement for care under this program is fifty (50) per cent of all monies expended by the 
Federal government, two-thirds of the balance by the State, the remaining one-third balance to be assumed 
by the local community. This department aided forty-three cases during the year 1961 for a total 
expenditure of $47, 147. 47. 

53 



General Relief: 



This program requires local Boards to meet the community's statutory obligation to relieve a 
person in need. The decisions on who shall be aided and the amount given is left entirely to the local 
Board's discretion. Unlike the Federal programs where the final decision rests with the State through an 
appeal process, the local Board makes the final decision. The local Boards, through their policies and 
decisions, invariably attempt to reflect community thinking. The financing of this program is a direct cost 
to the town. The only monies returned to the community for this type of relief are for cases whose settle- 
ments are in another community, or for those persons who have no legal settlement. On these cases, the 
total amount is either paid for by other cities and towns or by the State. The local Board, of course, is 
also liable for payments to other cities and towns on general relief when the person aided in another city 
or town has a Wilmington settlement. By legal settlement it is meant that a person has resided in a 
community for five consecutive years without aid. 

During the year 1961 there were 34 cases aided under this category in Wilmington, with a total 
expenditure of $6, 844. 48. 

Administration: 

Administration costs cover all expenditures by the Board to administer the five programs under 
its supervision, namely: Old Age Assistance, Medical Assistance for the Aged, Disability Assistance, 
Aid to Dependent Children and General Relief. Reimbursement under the four Federal programs is 75% - 
50% by the Federal Government and Z5% by the State, the remaining 25% is paid by the local community. 
Federal funds, as in the other programs, are restricted by law for the sole use of administration. The 
State's share is returned to the Excess and Deficiency Fund and is used by the town for any purpose. 
Administration costs for General Relief are not reimbursable by the Federal or State governments. 

General Comments: 

The Board wishes to again note that economic conditions are the basic rules governing the amount 
of monies expended under its various programs and the total cost to the town is relatively small compared 
to the total amount expended; also the great benefits the community as a whole derives from these various 
programs and services. By services we mean advice, counsel and help for families or individuals needing 
rehabilitation. This agency has also used whatever influence it might have in seeking employment for 
able-bodied persons. 

The Board wishes at this time to thank the local Police Department for its excellent help and 
cooperation during the past year. It was this type of cooperation that helped increase the amount of monies 
recovered from parents who previously were delinquent in their support payments. The Board also wishes 
to thank the Fire Department for services given the department by its ambulance in the transportation of 
the medically indigent during the past year. 

The local Board also wishes to publicly thank the following for their unselfish generosity to the 
needy during the past holiday season: The Wilmington-T ewksbury Council Knights of Columbus, Communit' 
Fund, Jaycee -ettes, Wilmington Lions Club, Wilmington Grange #268, Pack 56 Cub Scouts, Jaycees, 
Brownies, Fire Department, and any other organization or person that aided this department during 1961. 

The Board closes its annual report with the following capsuled version of one of its principles: 
Public assistance is merely a part of a general scheme of social security and welfare, a supplementary to 
the insurance programs and interrelated to other social programs which directly and indirectly affects each 
and every one of us. 

This report was prepared for the local Board of Public Welfare by its Director of Public 
Assistance - Walter F. Coleman. 



54 



J 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Board of Health 



Per sonnel 



Mr. A. C. Walker, Jr., Chairman 
Mrs. Marion C. Boylen 
Mr. Erving S. Pfau 



Patrick A. Thibeau, M. S. - Public Health Officer 

( re signed Decenriber , 1961) 
Gerald A. Fagan, M. D. - Medical Officer 
Anne Butters, R.N. - Public Health Nurse 
Leo E. LeBlanc - Animal & Slaughtering Inspector 
Gardiner Lester, D. V. M. - Veterinarian 



During the year the town lost the services of its public health officer, Patrick A. Thibeau, who 
accepted a commission with the U. S. Public Health Service. Under Mr. Thibeau' s leadership, Wilmington 
has gained recognition by officials of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health for its outstanding 
health programs. 

Mr. Thibeau's professional competence, kindess and sincerity made him liked and respected 
by all who knew him. His loss will be sincerely felt by the town for many years. 

During Mr. Thibeau's absence, the Board has been obliged to set up interim public health pro- 
cedures, the success of which has been due in large part to the wholehearted cooperation of many Town 
officials and local citizens. In particular, the Board would like to thank the following individual s; - 
Leo LeBlanc, Robert Meserve, Anne Butters, Rae Burns, John LaPlante, Dr. Gerald A. Fagan, and 
Simon Cutter. 

The year 1961 saw the continuation of the Community health program relating to communicable 
disease control, public health nursing, environmental sanitation with sanitary laboratory analysis. Pre- 
ventive measures against communicable diseases afflicting children and infants were practiced through 
immunization and Salk polio clinics. In addition, a Flu clinic was held this year for town personnel. A 
resume of the activities carried on this year follows: 

A Communicable Disease Control: 

I. Immunization Clinics: 

Clinics were again held this year for the immunization of infants and preschool children from 
three months to six years of age. All children attending these clinics received protection 
against whooping cough, diphtheria and tetanus. Although these diseases are now virtually 
controlled, many cases still occur in children who have not received their inoculations. It 
is therefore very important that parents see that this is done, either by their own physician 
or at one of these clinics. Four clinics were held in the Community Room at Deming Way. 



c 



Si 
c 

I 
I 



Booster doses given 

Children inoculated at clinics 

Children completing series of three doses 



105 
52 
32 



It is of interest to note that, through the efforts of their parents, most children entering school 
have received a maximiim or near maximum protection against poliomyelitis, whooping cough, 
diphtheria and tetanus. Wilmington School Department statistics show that of 431 children 
enrolled in Grade I, four hundred have received immunization protection against whooping cough, 
diphtheria and tetanus, and 398 against poliomyelitis. 



55 



II. 



Polio Inoculation Clinics: 



Two family polio clinics were held this year, on Sundays, at the Wildwood School. A total of 
634 individuals received polio injections. First, second, third, fourth and fifth polio doses 
were given, and any one 3 nnonths of age and over was eligible for any dose. 

III. Asian Flu Clinic: 

Due to the threatened epidemic of Asian Flu and the possibility of crippling essential services 
of the Town, a special flu clinic was held. Because of the shortage of vaccine, the clinic was 
limited to Town personnel. It was held in the Community Room at Deming Way and ninety- 
six town employees received protection against this disease. 

IV. Anti-Rabies Clinic: 

For the seventh consecutive year, an anti-rabies clinic was held in the late spring. 
Gardiner Lester, D. V. M. was the attending veterinarian. A total of 490 dogs received their 
anti-rabies inoculations. The cost of operating this clinic was defrayed by charging a nominal 
fee . 

B Public Health Nursing Visits: 

Nursing visits for the year 1961 756 
Fees collected for visits $421 

This phase of the Public Health Nurse's program is offered only under the direction and super- 
vision of a physician. Its purpose is to offer skilled nursing care to those persons requiring such service 
in the home; to teach through demonstration and to supervise care given by household members. It is 
available to any person living within the community. 

Health Visits: 

A total of 178 visits were made in the interest of child and adult health. These visits include 
prenatal, postnatal, premature, communicable disease, infant, child and adult health. It is the aim of this 
service to provide needed care and instruction for all members of the family, in whatever environments 
they may be, and to acquaint them with resources and facilities whereby they may formulate plans to safe- 
guard their own physical, emotional and social well-being. 

Day Care Cente rs - Nursing Homes: 

The licensing of Day Care Centers is the responsibility of the Board of Health. Nursing Home; 
are licensed by the State Department of Public Health but must have an application of approval from the 
local Board of Health before a license can be granted. New State laws make it necessary for the Building 
Inspector and Fire Inspector also to issue certificates of approval annually before licenses can be granted 
to Day Care Centers. 

Total number of inspections 
Tuberculosis Report for 1961: 

Total number of active cases on Register , 12/31/61 
Total number of active cases hospitalized, 12/31/61 
New cases reported in 1961 
Deaths reported 

Number of diagnosed cases visited 
Total number of visits made to diagnosed cases 
Total no. of visits (contacts, cases, suspects) 
No. of visits to North Reading State Sanatorium 
No. of visits to Middlesex County Sanatorium 



10 
2 
1 
1 

14 

37 
103 
7 
13 



56 



In the spring of 1961 a tuberculin testing prograni was again conducted in the school system. 
Certain grades have been tested each year as part of a case-finding program. The Public Health Nurse 
assisted the school nurses in this program, and examination of reactors to the test and follow-up of con- 
tacts were under the supervision of the Public Health Nurse. 

In May of 1961 the North Reading State Sanatorium closed its doors, thus making it impossible 
for x-ray and follow-up at this hospital. All cases have been transferred to the Middlesex County Sana- 
torium in Waltham, and any person wishing to have an x-ray for detection of, or follow-up of tuberculosis 
must now go to the Middlesex County Sanatorium. 

In relation to the control of tuberculosis, an x-ray program for foodhandlers was established 
in i960. This program is still being carried out, and all food handlers are required to have periodic 
x-rays . 

C. Environmental Sanitation: 

Environmental sanitation is the control and/or improvement of man's surroundings to better 
promote his physical well-being, comfort, and enjoyment of those surroundings. There are by necessity 
many aspects to environmental sanitation, but those functions generally practiced by this Board concern 
themselves with water, milk, sewage, refuse disposal, housing and recreational area sanitation. 

I. Water Sanitation: 

a. Private Wells: 

Number of wells inspected 
Found satisfactory 

Found to be contaminated or with high 
mineral content 

c 

With the ever -increasing development of the Town and with the ensuing discharge of domestic 
and industrial wastes into the ground water, the possibility of contamination of private water s 
supplies becomes more and more possible. It is therefore urged that townspeople have at 5 
least a yearly analysis of their wells. The Board of Health is equipped to perform this ser- 
vice at no cost or obligation. 

b. Municipal System: 

Periodic examination of the Town water supply is made by the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health. In 1961 the fluoridation program remained in effect, and daily analyses were 
performed to determine the concentration of sodium fluoride. 

Total number of fluoride tests 360 

II. Milk Sanitation: 

Licensed Dairies 18 

Pasteurization Plant Inspected 12 

Samples of Milk & Cream Analyzed 210 

III. Food Sanitation: 

A total of 73 inspections were made on the following food establishments: 



Restaurants 25 Industrial Cafeterias 2 

Soda Fountains 10 Mobile Canteens 2 

Luncheonettes 7 Bakeries 5 

Submarine Sandwich Shops 2 Grocery & Variety Stores 12 

School Cafeterias 4 Ice Cream Mfg. Establish. 4 

57 



46 
30 



16 



IV. 



Sewage Disposal Sanitation: 



Total sewerage permits issued 143 
New Dwellings 108 
Older Dwellings (includes new systems, replace- 
ments and renewals) 27 
Commercial 3 
Industrial 3 
Schools (1 replacement, 1 new) 2 

Lots on which restrictions were removed 1 

In addition to the above, some lots were found unsuitable for the sanitary disposal of sewage. 
Should building be permitted on these lots, a nuisance could eventually be created that would 
be detrimental to the neighborhood. 

The Health Department has been informed that the Massachusetts Department of Public Health 
is no longer approving the discharge of waste from commercial laundromats into the subsoil. 
Therefore the Health Department shall not issue permits to laundromats unless discharge of 
the effluent is made through a municipal sewage system. 

V. Refuse Disposal: 

Garbage collections and rubbish disposal (through the operation of the Town Dump) are adminis- 
tered by contract through the Board of Health. These public works functions account for over 
sixty per cent of the total Board of Health budget. Inquiries concerning these services should 
be made to this office. 

VI. Recreational Area Sanitation: 

Sanitation at any public or private recreational area is regulated by the Board of Health. Wate 
supplies must be safe, sewage disposal must be sanitary, and bathing waters must not be so 
contaminated as to be injurious to swimmers. There are three recreational areas in town: 

Silver Lake - Public 

Camp Forty Acres - Boy and Girl Scout Camp 

Mill Brook Camp - Commercial and semi -private 

Inspections were made at both camps prior to licensing by the Board of Health. Analyses of 
the water supplies showed that they were safe for drinking purposes. 

VII. Housing Sanitation: 

In connection with the housing code, a number of dwellings were repaired, remodeled or torn 
down after inspections. Special counsel for the Board of Health arranged hearings at District 
Court regarding various dwellings condemned as unfit by the Board of Health. Several cases , 
involving eviction from these dwellings are planned in Superior Court in 1962. In I960, the j 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health promulgated further regulations regarding sub- 
standard dwellings. Since these regulations are more strict for the most part than the Wil- j 
mington Housing Code, it shall be necessary to enforce these new standards. 

VIII. Miscellaneous Inspections: 

Town Dump 15 

Recreational Camps 4 

School Inspections 1 

Piggeries 18 

Stables 24 



58 



D. 



Permits and Licenses: 



Three hundred and seven (307) permits and/or licenses were granted by the Board of Health 
after inspection and approval: 

Refuse transportation permits 38 

Wholesale manufacture of Ice Cream 1 

Retail manufacture of Ice Cream 1 

Milk Dairy Licenses 18 

Milk Store Licenses 30 

Oleomargarine Licenses 10 

Sewerage Installation Permits 143 

Piggeries 11 

Funeral Directing 3 

Stable Licenses 2 

Food Permits 41 

Dumps 2 

Camps 2 

Salvage I 

Kindergarten 4 

E. Laboratory: 



The Health Officer this year performed a total of 885 bacteriological and chemical analyses of 
water, dairy products and sterility tests on restaurant utensils. A summary of these analyses 
and comparison with I960 follows: 

% Satisfactory 
Satisfactory I960 1961 



Milk and Cream samples 
Private Wells 
Town Water (fluoride) 
Recreational Camp Wells 
Restaurant Utensils 
Schools: 1/2 pt. school milk 
Cafeteria utensils 



No. 

324 
134 
3 60 
12 
35 
12 
9 



220 
94 

218 
12 
26 
10 



86. 6 

76. 5 
51. 

100. 

77. 7 
100 . 

83. 3 



67. 9 
70. 1 
60. 5 
100. 
74. 2 
83. 3 



c 



c 

I 
I 



In conclusion, the Board of Health and its personnel wish to express their gratitude to the many 
individuals of the Town for their aid and cooperation. The Board of Health is especially indebted to those 
ladies who so ably assisted at the immunization and polio clinics. 



59 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 



All regular routine work, before my general highway program begins, was accomplished. Under 
my supervision, all hot top laid in the Cemetery, Police Station, and Adams Street was finished before j 
Memorial Day. Also, I supervised the laying of hot top at the Swain and Center Schools, plus hauling and | 
spreading loam at both schools. The raking and seeding was done by the Cemetery Department. '\ 

In conjunction with my regular highway program, the following projects were completed: - ! 
Powder House Circle drainage at a cost of $1,494.00, Carolyn Road at a cost of about $14,900.00, and 
Pineridge Road at a cost of about $12, 000. 00. 

Boutwell Street - 1250 feet long and 30 feet wide all trees, stumps, subsoil, ledge and 

boulders excavated one new 30-inch culvert installed one 12-inch culvert extended 28 feet 

2 catch basins and 40 feet of 12-inch pipe installed one concrete retaining wall 160 feet long poured. . . . 

street graveled, graded, and surfaced with hot top asphalt curbing laid on both sides, plus a 5-foot 

hot top sidewalk total cost for labor and material $17,998. 00. About 400 feet of guard rail should j 

be installed on the back of the sidewalk for the protection of the school children. | 

Lower end of Baker Street excavated and graveled end of Pershing Street to railroad track 

excavated and graveled end of Columbia Street excavated, graveled and surfaced end of Dunton j 

Road excavated and surfaced to eliminate a bad water condition that existed for a very long time one ! 

catch basin and 200 feet of pipe installed on Grove Avenue to eliminate a bad water condition one 24- 
inch culvert installed on Hopkins Street to eliminate a bad water condition. 

Chapter 90 Maintenance: 

Money expended on Lowell Street to lay hot top from West Street to Perry's Corner and from 
Parker Street to Route 38, at a cost of $4, 499. 00. 

Chapter 90 Construction: I960 Contract 

Concord and Federal Streets from railroad tracks to Federal Hill all trees, stumps, ledge, 

boulders, subsoil and peat excavated 1400 feet of pipe and 10 catch basins installed one large 

c\ilvert installed 800 feet of guard rail installed street graveled, graded and surface-treated with 

tar total cost for labor and material about $24, 000. 00. 

Chapter 90 Construction: 1961 Contract 

Concord, Federal, Church and Salem Streets all catch basin and manhole frames raised to |,:| 

grade for hot top. Concord Street from Woburn Street surfaced with hot top to Federal Street, continuing 
along Federal Street to Federal Hill. Six hundred and fifty (650) feet of asphalt curb laid to control the 

flow of surface water down Federal Hill curbing backfilled with loam Church Street from Route 38 

to Beacon Street, Salem Street from Thrush Road for a distance of five hundred feet total expenditures 

for labor and material for the three streets -- $21,879. 00. The balance carried over to 1962 to complete 
surfacing the rotary at the junction of Middlesex Avenue and Salem Street. 

Chapter 8 1: 

(In conjunction with Town money for labor, material and equipment). Cleaning all catch basins, 

culverts, and some ditches - $1, 150 cleaning gutters, sweeping streets and hauling away dirt - $935. .. 

stump removal (hired stump saw) - $968 patching - $800 pipe, catch basins, bricks and cement - 

$605 brush and weed killer - $435 granite curb and corners - $7, 225. 



60 



Chapter 81 (continued): 



No. 
Feet 

Surface treated, sealed and fnixed in place: 



Cost 



No. 
Feet 



Cost 



Glen Road 


4900 


$4, 585 


West Street 


3000 


$1, 048 


Swain Road 


2800 


1. 020 


Woburn Street 


8500 


7,213 


Surface treated, sealed: 












Andover Street (and hot top) 


5350 


3, 380 


Lawrence St. (patch shoulders) 


3500 


1, 085 


Ballardvale Street 


8300 


1, 230 


McDonald Road 


3000 


510 


Birchwood Road 


1500 


764 


Middlesex Avenue 


3500 


1 . 551 


Chestnut Street 


3800 


1, 890 


Miller Road 


900 


195 


Cochrane Road 


1000 


480 


Nassau Avenue 


1800 


326 


Dobson Street 


1 500 


680 


Oakdale Road 


2800 


964 


Eames Street 


3800 


1, 196 


Pinewood Road 


1500 


678 


X alx llClLl r\ Vjd LI 




1 8 5 


/-t ^ o ^ 1 r A 1 i" ^ ^ 

xxOObcVclt i\ OcLQ 






Forest Street 


2200 


770 


Shady Lane Drive 


3000 


920 


Highland Street 


1200 


280 


Taft Road 


2200 


525 


Jones Avenue 


900 


195 


Washington Avenue 


1800 


395 


Judith Road 


500 


265 


Williams Avenue 


900 


195 


Surface treated mix in place: 












Burlington Avenue 


600 


810 


Linda Road 


1800 


935 


Cedar Avenue 


650 


563 


Lockwood Road 


1000 


1. 035 


Forrest Ave. 


600 


480 


Nichols Street 


3900 


5, 523 


Glendale Circle 


1000 


865 


School Street 


550 


625 


Glenview Road (and curb) 


500 


1, 001 


Shawsheen Road 


1250 


950 


Drainage : 












Lowell Street 




360 


North Street (culverts) 




450 


Coolidge Road (clean ditch) 




85 


Salem Street 




295 


Grove Avenue 




. 460 


Shawsheen Avenue 




325 



c 



I 
I 



Mi scellaneous: 



Ainsworth Road 
Adams Street 
Baker Street 
Church Street 
Columbia Street 
Concord Street 
Concord Street 
Chestnut Street 
Dunton Road 
Garden Court 
Lloyd Road 
Marcus Road 
Middlesex Avenue 
Pershing Street 

Suncrest Avenue 
Thrush Road 



Gravel, patch, and scrape 125 

Hot topped - 475 ft. 2, 034 

Short section, excavate and gravel 265 

Cut and clean gutter and shoulders 350 

Construction and surfaced - 175 ft. 625 

Clean an d level off pit 600 

Reset fence post, curb, and backfill 285 

Hot patched - 150 ft. 284 

Construction and surfaced - 150 ft. 475 

Graveled, graded and surfaced - 750 ft. 2,715 

Short section, excavate, and gravel 250 

New construction - 650 ft. , surface treated 3. 595 
Surface treated, hot top - 180 ft. , sidewalk - 450 ft. gravel 1,290 
Cut trees, remove stumps, brush, excavate and backfill 

with gravel - 200 ft. 685 

Curb and hot patched 385 

Hot patch - 125 ft. 60 



61 



II 



Miscellaneous: 



Cutting trees with the Tree Department - $2, 200 Police Station: graveling and grading for 

hot top - $500 Cemetery: graveling and rolling for hot top - $500 Schools: Swain and Center 

Schools - graveling, grading and rolling for hot top. Hauling and spreading loam for the same two schools 

$580 High School: labor and material to dig trench to uncover steam pipes and backfill with sand and 

patch - $150 Street signs and posts - $400 Silver Lake Beach - labor $100. 

At this writing all my equipment is in good condition except the front -end loader which has seen 
plenty of service. Repairs on it have been below normal, but it is a case of just being worn out. I could 
spend a lot of money on it, but its trade-in value would not offset the cost. It should be replaced in 1962 
with a new one of the same model as used by the Water Department. The Water Department has helped me 
a great deal this winter with theirs. 

Rather than spend $1, 200. 00 to repair the front-end of one of the Snow Fighters, after a short 
discussion with the Town Manager, it was decided to purchase a good used chassis, with a good engine, 
front-end, and power steering for $1,400. 00. All the work involved in transferring the body, cab, tires, 
etc. plus sand blasting and painting was done in our garage by my mechanics. When finished, it looked 
like a new truck. 

The two mechanics are doing a very good job in maintaining all town-owned equipment at a very 
moderate cost. 

The Cemetery Department has been most cooperative in plowing snow and like the Tree Depart- 
ment, they have been a tremendous help for which I am grateful. 

In conclusion, I am taking this opportunity to thank the various departments for their cooperatioi 
and help, big or small, and the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen for their faith and trust in the 
Highway Department. 




New Highway Truck and Rebuilt Snow Fighter 



62 



WELCOMES 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Left to right: Arthur Lynch, Robert Hastings, George Robertie, 
Ernest Crispo, Harold Shea, John Hartnett, and Edward Page 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

The School Connmittee of the Town of Wilmington herewith presents its report for the year 1961. 
The membership of the Committee was as follows: 

Mr. Ernest M. Crispo, Chairman 

Mr. George G. Robertie, Vice Chairman 

Mr. Robert F. Hastings, Secretary 

Mr. John F. Hartnett 

Mr. Arthur V. Lynch 

Mr. Edward F. Page 

One of the most important actions taken in 1961 was to place all supervising principals on an 
eleven month work schedule. This is the key move in a plan to reorganize the administrative and supervisor' 
functions of the School Department to meet the needs of a rapidly growing school system. This step was 
taken instead of employing an assistant superintendent of schools. By reorganizing along this line, the 
Committee feels the following objectives will be realized: 

1. Maximum help will be provided where there is maximum need, namely, at the 
individual school level rather than at the central office level. This plan will 

insure year-round leadership, under the direction of the superintendent, in: ( 
continuing curriculum development, imaginative teacher recruitment, sound 
teacher placement, vigorous in-service training, and alert community relations. 

2. It will cost the town less money. 



66 



As a result of the above action, the following forward looking programs are in operation in the 
Wilmington Public Schools: 



1. Ability groupings in jvinior and senior high school programs 

2. Accelerated classes in English, mathematics, and reading 

3. Special programs for slow learning pupils 

4. A developmental reading program that will extend through grade 12 

5. An improved and improving music program 

6. The inclusion in the school calendar of an Orientation Day program for all new 
teachers to be held prior to the opening of schools in September 

7. An expanded summer school program at both the elementary and secondary 
school levels 



8. Expansion of gmdance and counseling services to serve all students in 
grades 7-12 



These and other accomplishments will be covered in detail in the report of the Superintendent. 

During the year, the Committee elected eight teachers to tenure, appointed 29 teachers to fill 
staff vacancies, and one staff member was granted a leave of absence. The number of teachers in the 

system continues to increase in response to the needs of a growing school population. In September of I960. ^ 

the number of teachers and principals was 138. At the start of the school year 1961, the number had grown ^ 

to 150, and we estimate that I6l will be required for the opening of school in the fall of 1962. Recognizing § 

the need to attract and hold a competent professional staff, the Committee revised the salary schedule at ^ 

the maximum levels and liberalized the sick leave policy. ^ 

Schools were in session 180 days beginning September 7, I960 and ending June 21, 1961. ' 

The Committee held 14 regvilar meetings and 7 special meetings during the year. 

The School Committee thanks the various civic committees, town departments, and the many 
individuals who have been so cooperative and helpful to the School Department during the past year. 




Meeting of The National Honor Society 
67 



SUPERINTENDE NT OF SCHOOLS 



> 




Harold S. Shea, Superintendent 



To the School Committee and Citizens of Wilmington: 



I herewith submit my second Annual Report as Superintendent of the Wilmington Public Schools 
for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1961. 

A steadily increasing pupil enrollment and an increasing emphasis on higher educational stan- 
dards at all grade levels have had their influence on our staff, our curriculum, and our building needs. 
Major accomplishments in each of these areas at the elementary and secondary levels during 1961 are noted 
in the pages that follow. 



The Elementary School Program 



The adoption of the language text, "Language for Daily Use", which was introduced in I960, was 
completed this year. During the winter and spring, spelling texts, submitted by the different publishers, 
were evaluated. In September, "Spelling Goals", published by Webster Publishing Company, was adopted 
for grades two and three, and "Spelling for Word Mastery", published by Charles E. Merrill Books, Inc. 
was selected for grades four, five, and six. 

In-service programs were held in arithmetic, spelling, and French. Miss Marion Gorham of 
Concord conducted a fifteen week course on arithmetic methodology and modern mathematics. Miss Goldie 
Wilson, consultant of Charles E. Merrill Books, Inc. demonstrated and discussed techniques which make 
spelling more meaningful and interesting to the pupil, and briefed the teachers on the latest research in 
spelling. Mrs. Mary Frances, from the Modern Language Project and the 21" Classroom, held a series 
of workshops to assist teachers in techniques of teaching French. 

New programs produced by "The 21" Classroom" during the past year were a phonics program 
for use in grades one through three, and a science program for grades one and two. The In- school tele- 
vision programs are produced by the Massachusetts Executive Committee for School Television which is 
appointed by the State Board of Education. The project is supported and conducted by the participating 
communities in Eastern Massachusetts and broadcast over the facilities of WGBH-TV, Channel 2, during 



68 



regular school hours. Because of the part that these programs play in our schools today, children were 
given an opportunity to contribute to the rebuilding fund for WGBH-TV following the disastrous fire at their 
station. The response was excellent, and a total of $420 was presented to a representative of the station 
by the school children, of Wilmington. 

Presently a committee of elementary teachers is preparing a curriculum guide in arithmetic to 
be ready for use in the fall of 1962. This culminates the work done on arithmetic during the last few years. 
It will provide the teachers with a current arithmetic guide and also serve as a reference work for the intro 
duction of modern mathematical approaches in the future. 

A further advance in the elementary curriculum will be made with the initiation of a third year 
program in Conversational French. This will be introduced at the sixth grade level and will be presented 
as a continuation of the televised program which we are currently using in grades four and five. 

A comprehensive program in the phonetic method of teaching reading, beginning in grade one 
and extending through grade six, was launched with the opening of school in September of 1961. This 
method, which is in direct contrast to the sight or look say method of teaching reading, is part of a definite 
trend across the country toward earlier and stronger emphasis on phonics. 

During the spring months, the principals visited many of the universities and colleges in the 
Greater Boston area, and the University of Massachusetts, to interview prospective teachers and explain 
to them the educational program and school organization in Wilmington. This is part of a long range pro- 
gram to upgrade our teacher recruitment and selection procedure. 

A total of 355 students in grades 4-6 enrolled for study in reading and arithmetic with sub- 
stantial gains being registered it the end of the six weeks session. In grades 7-12, two hundred and twenty 
five (225) students enrolled for study with particxilar emphasis being placed on mathematics, English, and 
reading. 

During the coming year, the in-service activities will be directed toward a review of the 
science curriculvim in grades one through six, and also the social studies program in grades four and five. 
One of the immediate results of this undertaking will be the publication of a formal science curriculum 
guide, which will be made available to all teachers as an additional step in further coordinating science 
instruction throughout the elementary grades. 

The Secondary School Program 

General Statement: 

The major improvement during the past year was the increase in Gmdance Personnel and the 
resultant services to the student, to the parent, and to the teacher. From one full-time person and two 
part time, there are now two full-time and three part-time personnel on duty. 

In the curriculum area an elective system was instituted replacing the former established 
course program. Pupils are required to take four years of English, one year of United States History, one 
year of Problems of Democracy, and four years of Physical Education. The rest of the program is based 
on electives in other subject areas after conferences with the pupil and his guidance counselor. The net 
result has brought about a broader and richer program for the pupil. One further step in the curriculum 
area has been a stronger policy of ability grouping. This enables the pupil to progress at a rate commen- 
surate with his capabilities. This is another benefit derived from increased Guidance Services. 

The following developments took place within the various subject areas: 

English: 

A revised course of study to meet the needs of pupils under ability grouping was initiated. An 
advanced group in senior English was established with enrichment in composition and literature. This 



69 



group is working at the college freshman level. In the seventh and eighth grades, special attention was 
given to slow readers. 

Social Studies: 



A new minor was introduced this year, International Affairs. This course is basically a dis- 
cussion type which enables the student to better understand United States Foreign Policy and foreign nations 
throughout the world. In grades seven and eight, the former social studies courses were replaced with 
basic courses in United States History and Geography. 

Foreign Language: 

This year twelve more positions were added to the language laboratory, bringing the total up to 
twenty-four. In the eighth grade, the number of hours of French was increased from two to four. 

Mathematic s: 

There are now three advanced groups in mathematics, one in grade seven, the second in grade 
eight, and the third in grade nine. There is a group of students in the Mathematics League which meets in 
competition with a group of schools within a fifteen mile radius of Wilmington. This is an extracurricular 
event and quite beneficial to those concerned. 

Science: 



A new course in science was initiated this year, namely, Earth Science. This course is geared 
primarily to those students who do not take Chemistry and Physics. It emphasizes such phases as the 
earth's magnetism, oceans, mineral deposits, the atmosphere and its phenomena. The science offerings 
in grades seven and eight were increased by two hours this year. 

Business Education: 



This year saw a decided increase in typewriting. The placement service under Mrs. Webber 
continues to grow and many of our graduates are being employed by local industries. 

Industrial Arts: 

Drafting has been expanded to a four year course, which takes the pupil from a beginning coursei 
through engineering drawing if he chooses to specialize in drafting. Three girls have enrolled in this pro- 
gram this year. The electrical-electronics shop phase has been doubled from five to ten hours per week,. 
Woodworking now includes an introduction to power hand tools. The recent acquisition of an arc welder 
has broadened the phase of general metals. The graphic arts have expanded with the addition of photo- 
offset equipment consisting of a dark room, two-color offset press, plate maker, camera, and light table. 
This enables us to acquaint the student with the latest modern printing techniques as well as the art of hand 
composition. 

Home Economics: 

This program was revised to include food and clothing in grades nine and ten; nutrition and 
tailoring in grade eleven; and child care and family relationships in grade twelve. 

Fine Arts: 

Speech was returned to the program with over one hundred pupils participating. A major 
course in Art is available to high school pupils. In Music, one group is participating in music appreciatio 
three hours per week. There are two groups in mixed chorus, a girls' chorus and a boys' chorus. The 
band now has eighty members. This year has seen a phenomenal growth in the quantity and quality of the 
Music program as witnessed in our Christmas Festival of Music. We hope the townspeople will respond 
equally well to the Spring Music Festival. 



70 



Reading: 



A developmental reading program was introduced. At present, this is offered to seniors but, 
in the future, it will extend to the underclassmen along with power (speed) reading courses. 

Athletics : 

1961 was the year of Champions for Wilmington High School Athletes. The baseball team went 
into state tournament play and was eliminated in a close contest with Woburn, which went on to win the 
State Title. In the fall, the football team went through an undefeated season and became the Lowell Suburb- 
an Champions. Our other teams, both boys and girls, gave an excellent accounting of themselves, and 
though not champions by record, proved themselves champions in scholarship and sportsmanlike conduct. 

The Class of 1961 : 

Of the 148 graduates of the Class of 1961, 45% are continmng their education, 48% are work- 
ing, and 7% are in the Armed Services. 



Wilmington's Long Range School Building Program 

The people of Wilmington are to be congratulated for the excellent job they have done in provid- 
ing classrooms for their children. However, if they wish to continue with the same high degree of educa- 
tional opportunity, the job confronting them must be continued for at least the next ten years. 

As part of a planned program, the School Administration constantly studies and reviews J 
Wilmington's school building needs and brings the data up to date. On the basis of the first study, a long 2 
range building plan was formulated, and this plan has been reviewed periodically. ^ 

I 

Our latest review reveals that the early planning was sound. The only recommended changes C 
are in the dates for the completion of some of the planned projects. The survey shows that some of the £ 
proposed elementary buildings can be postponed for one year, providing the explosive areas in the town do j 
not develop too rapidly. The School Administration strongly recommends the acquisition of sites for these 
schools as soon as is practicable, lest the Town find itself in difficult, sensitive, and costly land taking 
situations. 



After careful study, the following recommendations are made: 



The School Building Program 



For Occupancy 
In 


Type of Estimated 
Building Classroom Needs 


General 
Location 


1962 


Intermediate Grades 18 Classrooms plus 
6-8, or 7 - 8 Special Rooms 
(This school will be ready) 


North 

Wilmington 


1964 


Elementary 12 - 15 


North 

Wilmington 


1966 


Elementary 12 - 15 


West 

Wilmington 


1968 


Intermediate 18 Classrooms plus 

Special Rooms 


West 

Wilmington 


After 1969 


Not fully determined at the time of this report 





71 



LOOKING AHEAD 



Our schools today face many problems. Some of them are state and national in character, and 
it will take much time and patience to solve them. Others are local and can be solved without too much 
difficulty, providing the citizenry desire. These are some of the problems: 

1. Sufficient money to operate schools of reasonable standards either through better 
use of local resources, a more generous state aid program, or a stepped up 
Federal aid program. 

2. Recruiting competent and well trained staff to meet increasing enrollments, to care 
for replacements, to upgrade the curriculum, and to provide for specialists 
particularly in the area of psychological services, audio-visual education, and 
automated teaching 

3. Higher salaries for teachers 

4. Construct new buildings and rehabilitate or replace old ones either through using 
present methods of financing, experimenting with newer methods, or more sub- 
sidies from the Federal government 

5. How to meet the educational implications of automation? This rapidly developing 
manufacturing technique will make learning a life activity if workers are to remain 
productive for their natural careers. 



In closing, I believe that the School Administration and Staff had a good year. It continued its 
task of providing the best possible education for the youth of Wilmington within the Town's ability to pay; 
at the same time, it increased the opportunities to be of service to the Town. This is our perennial task, 
and we welcome it. 

May I once again express my sincere thanks to you, to the staff, and to the citizens for the 
understanding and support given to the public school program throughout the year. 




SARAH D. J. CARTER LECTURE FUND 




Rear Admiral Donald B. MacMillan came to Wilmington on April 15, 1961 and completely 
captivated a capacity audience with his film, "Beyond the Northern Lights". He proved that for all his 
eighty-six years, he is still one of the most fascinating personalities on the platform today. 

This Spring, on April 7, 1962, we will go to Holland when John Roberts, veteran of many film 
assignments for Lowell Thomas will present his latest travelogue, "Holland and the Amazing Dutch". The 
program will be held in the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium at 8. 15 p. m. and is free of charge to the people 
of Wilmington through the generosity of the late Sarah D. J. Carter. The Committee extends a cordial 
invitation to all to attend. 

We are pleased to announce the appointment by the Town Manager of Jacqueline Piatt to the 
Sarah D. J. Carter Lecture Committee. 

Treasurer's Report 
Receipts Expenditures 



Cash on hand 1/1/61 $ 57.46 Howard Higgins $200.00 

Janitor 10. 00 

Received from Town Treas. 400.00 Police 8.00 

Printing - Publicity Town Crier 36. 00 

Interest 1.88 Harold Waterhouse , Projectionist 5. 00 

459. 34 259.00 



Cash on hand 1/1/62 190.34 



73 



SCHOOL MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT 



Buzzell School: 

Completely renovate and rebuild teachers' room, 
office and hallway 

Wash and paint 5 classrooms, 2 hallways, 2 toilets - 
because of fire damage 

Replace shingles and roof boards where necessary 
due to damage from fire 

Repair all outside doors, renail clapboards, and re- 
place clapboards where needed 

Entire outside of building painted two coats 

Install vent to boiler room 

Install two new door checks 

Correct low spot in floor of Room 2 

Center School: 

Install new window shades in all rooms 

Install new window shades in hallways and toilet rooms 

Repair desks in Room 3 

Paint front and rear hall 

Varnish railings and doors 

Repair ceiling blocks in Room 1 and 2 

Replace sill in rear of building 

Replace two new doors in rear of building 

Rebuild front platform and steps 

Replace plastered ceiling in downstairs hallway 

Entire outside of building given two coats of paint 

Set frosted glass in all toilet room windows 

Hot top driveway and walks to school 

Glen Road School: 

Build and install bookcases in nurse's office 
Reinforce floor register at service entrance 
Paint outside exposed beams 

Install shields on exit lights in all-purpose room 
High School: 

Clean and service three oil burners 
Replace two condensation pumps 

Paint ceilings, walls, doors, windows in seventeen 

classrooms of second wing 
Paint wardrobe closets and bookcases in second wing 

classrooms 
Paint all bulletin boards - second wing 
Reseal all doors - second wing 

Paint stairway railing throughout entire school bldg. 
Point all cracks throughout school building 
Install partitions and divide Room 104 into three 
Guidance Offices 



High School (continued): 

Paint and install pinup boards and new book shelv- 
ing in Room 104 
Install new lights and outlets in Room 104 
Install new light fixtures in 17 classrooms of first 
wing 

Paint vent shields in toilets in first and second wing 

Install window level bookcases in Library 

Paint bookcases in Library 

Paint two small offices off Library 

Build and refinish bookdrop for Library 

Refinish tables and desks, where necessary, 

throughout school 
Had Johnson controls balanced and checked through- 
out the building 
Install three bubblers in Industrial Arts area 
Replace four 4x8 sheetrock panels in Gym 
Rewire four rooms. Industrial Arts area, to comply 

with safety code 
Caulk all windows and doors in first and second 
wing 

Repair flag pole for Athletic Field 

All underground piping dug up and renewed - 

leading from oil tank to boiler room 
Build, install, and wire 24 booths for Language Lab 
Reseal and repack glass blocks in Library sky- 
lights 

Replace and resolder copper flashing on roof of 
first wing 

Replace drinking fountain in first wing 
Rewire Rooms 208-210 for electric typewriters 
Relocate lights in Tin Shop that caused interfer- 
ence in heating unit 
Replace twenty-five (25) glass blocks in Gym 
Plywood two large windows in Gym 
Drill and rebolt 200 chairs in Auditorium 

Rogers School: 

New steps built for side entrance 
Replace seven window shades in Room 4 
Paint walls in front and rear corridors 
Prepare two classroom floors and install new 
furniture 

Install 1,000 gallon septic tank and 1,800 sq. ft. 
leach bed 



74 



Roman House: 



Whitefield School (continued): 



Complete house cleaning from attic to cellar 
Rugs and curtains dry cleaned 

New cellar window installed and outside threshold 

replaced 
Oil all inside window sills 

Install electric outlet in office of Mrs. DeLisle 
Swain School: 

Install new blackboard in Rooms 7 and 10 
Hot top walks and driveway 

Paint four classrooms, four halls and four stairways 
Paint teachers' room, office and 6 closets 
: Install book shelves entire length of chalk board 
Install pinup board entire length of wall - opposite 
chalk board 

i Replace and install coat hooks to accommodate 340 
students 

. Rebuild and cover with tin outside fire exit door 
Place signs and numbers on all doors 

I Walker School: 

Fill in and hot top holes in driveway near street 
I Caulk outside walls 
' Paint doors, trim, and windows 

Build new back steps 

Replace chimney bricks and repoint chimney 
West School: 

Replace and repair toilet facilities 
I Overhaul furnace and replace furnace pipe 
Patch and repair all loosened plaster 
Install five electrical outlets 
Build six bulletin boards 

Entire school room given two coats of paint 

Entire outside of building given 2 coats of paint 
I Refinish teacher's desk and chair 
I Refinish 12 students' desks and chairs 

Build two rectangular tables 

Install new window shades 

Build shelves for plants 

Erect flag pole 



Paint hallways and all toilet rooms 
Install doors, boys' toilet room 

Build and place numbers on all doors throughout 
school 

Wildwood School: 

Install Venetian blinds with blackout specifications 

in 4 classrooms, east wing 
Paint corridors and kitchen walls 
Paint boys' and girls' toilet rooms 
Rebuild three aluminum awnings 
Rebuild boiler room door 
Varnish all inside doors 

Install screening on vents leading into crawl space 
Replace oil gauge in boiler room 
Patch and tar roof - where needed 
Install six glass blocks 

Miscellaneous: 

In addition, the following items were completed in 
or on all buildings in the system: 

Cleaned and overhauled boilers on hot water systems 

All pinup boards repainted 

All school warning signs painted 

All chalk boards cleaned and treated 

All slate boards honed and treated 

All wooden platforms and steps treated with a 

protective coat of preservative 
All windows washed 

All septic tanks checked and cleaned when necessary 
All storerooms inspected and cleaned 
All schools inspected for sand and rock salt 
All schools inspected for fire protection 
All fire extinguishers checked and recharged 
All window glass replaced throughout the system 
when necessary 



A sincere thank you to all school personnel and 
Whitefield School: department heads who have cooperated with our 

Maintenance Department the past year. 

Replaster ceiling in first floor hallway 
Replace window casings in upstairs classrooms 
Replace window shades in Room 4 

Patch and paint plaster near stairs leading to lunch- 
room 

Repoint brick walls in basement 
Caulk outside borders 

Paint outside trim, doors, and windows 
Paint stairways (upstairs &c downstairs) and cellar 
stairways 

75 



ACCEPTED STREETS 



Street 

Adams Street 
Ainsworth Road 
Aldrich Road 
Andover Street 
Auburn Avenue 
Ayotte Street 

Baker Street 
Ballardvale Street 
Bancroft Street 
Beacon Street 
Beech Street 
Beeching Avenue 
Belmont Avenue 
Birchwood Road 
Boutwell Street 
Brand Avenue 
Brattle Street 
Brentwood Avenue 
Bridge Lane 
Broad Street 
Burlington Avenue 
Burnap Street 
Burt Road 
Butters Row 



From 

Middlesex Ave. 
Woburn Street 
Shaw sheen Ave. 
Salem Street 
Shawsheen Ave. 
Westdale Ave. 

Brand Avenue 
Salem Street 
Liberty Street 
Church Street 
Burlington Ave. 
Cunningham St. 
Columbia Street 
Judith Road 
Aldrich Road 
Bridge Lane 
Massachusetts Ave. 
Woodside Avenue 
Main Street 
Carmel Street 
Main Street 
Grove Avenue 
Cedar Street 
Main Street 



To 

Parker Street 
Town land 
Billerica Line 
Andover Line 



Miles Feet Date(s) Accepted 



Andover Line 
B & M R. R. 
Belmont Avenue 
Byron Street 
Faulkner Avenue 
State Street 
Short Street 
Burlington Ave. 
Baker Street 
Garden Avenue 
Woburn Street 
Shawsheen Ave. 
Both Ways 
Burlington Line 
Winchell Road 
Fall Street 
Chestnut Street 

76 



1. 2 
2 3 



2. 7 



0. 8 



0. 3 



1. 6 



4600 
2600 



800 
800 

700 

400 
1000 
1000 

450 
1000 
1550 

2370 
1100 
907 

1377 

1378 
2500 



0. 6 



3-02-08 

6-05-61 
1 1-06-94 
1 1 -06-94 

3-12-45 

3-10-47 

3-12-45 
1 1-06-94 
3-17-52 
3-01-15 
3-10-47 
3-14-59 
3-03-33 

3-17-52 3-10-53 
11-06-94 3-12-6C 
3-13-33 3-08-43 
3-12-45 

i 

6-21-38 
1 1-06-94 

3-13-54 
1 1-06-94 

3-12-45 3-10-53 

3-12-45 3-11-46 
1 1-06-94 



Street 

Canal Street 

Carolyn R oad 

Carson Avenue 
Carson Avenue Ext 

Carter Lane 

Cedar Street 

Central Street 

Chandler Road 

Chapman Avenue 

Chase Road 

Chestnut Street 

Church Street 

Clark Street 

Cochrane Road 

Columbia Street 

Concord Street 

Congress Street 

Cook Avenue 

Coolidge Road 

Corey Avenue 

Cottage Street 

Cross Street 

Cunningham Street 

Cypress Street 

Davis Street 
Dayton Road 
Dell Drive 
Dobson Street 



From 

Shawsheen Avenue 
North Street 
Hathaway Road 
Marie Drive 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Harris Street 
Middlesex Avenue 
Kelly Road 
Hathaway Road 
Hathaway Road 
Burlington Avenue 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Forest Street 
Church Street 
Federal Street 
Forest Street 
Main Street 
Hathaway Road 
Grand Street 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Salem Street 
Glen Road 

Main Street 
Hathaway Road 
Burlington Ave. 
Glen Road 



To 

Burt Road 
Linda Road 
Both Ways 



Miles Feet Date(s) Accepted 



Burt Road 
Church Street 
Adams Street 



Woburn Line 
Middlesex Ave. 
Church Street 
Warren Road 
Talbot Avenue 
N. Reading Line 
Burlington Line 
Kensington Ave. 

Canal Street 

Lowell Street 
Beeching Avenue 



Gary Street 
77 



2. 1 
0. 8 
0. 8 

0. 1 

1. 1 



1511 
950 
677 
300 

1400 
600 
574 
400 
322 
297 



800 



965 
1000 
270 
370 
920 
900 
2320 
260 

500 
170 
450 
1402 



10-16-39 3-12-55 
3-12-60 

3-10-53 3-12-55 

3-11-61 

3-09-57 

3-12-45 

10- 16-50 
3-09-57 
3-05-51 
3-10-53 

1 1- 06-94 
1 1-06-94 
1 1-06-94 

3-10-47 

3-02-08 3-13-33 
1 1-06-94 

10- 16-39 
3-1 1-46 
3-05-51 
3-05-51 
3-13-54 

1 1- 06-94 

3/44 3/52 3/53 
3-05-51 

3-17-52 
3-05-51 
3-08-58 
3-13-54 



ACCEPTED STREETS 



Street 
Dorchester Street 
Dorothy Avenue 
Draper Drive 
Dublin Avenue 
Dunton Road 

Eames Street 
Edwards Road 
Emerson Street 

Fairfield Avenue 
Fairmeadow Road 
Fairview Avenue 
Faneuil Drive 
Faulkner Avenue 
Fay Street 
Federal Street 
Forest Street 

Glen Road 
Glendale Circle 
Glenview Road 
Gowing Road 
Grand Street 
Grant Street 
Grove Avenue 
Gunderson Road 

Hardin Street 



From 
Billerica Line 
Barbara Avenue 
Gunderson Road 
Main Street 
Nassau Avenue 

Main Street 
Forest Street 
Oakwood Road 

Main Street 
Nichols Street 
State Street 
Massachusetts Ave. 
Glen Road 
Glen Road 
Middlesex Avenue 
Aldrich Road 

Main Street 
Glen Road 
Suncrest Avenue 
Park Street 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Federal Street 
Main Street 
Hathaway Road 

Aldrich Road 



To 



Arlene Avenue 



Miles Feet Date(s) Accepted 



Both Ways 

Woburn Street 
Baldwin Road 
Faulkner Avenue 

Nichols Street 



W. Jamaica Ave. 
Gary Street 
Woburn Street 
Burlington Ave. 

Middlesex Ave. 
Glen Road 

Marcus Road 
Dunmore Road 
B & M R. R. 
Lake Street 
Both Ways 

Lubbers Brook 



0. 7 



1. 1 

0. 8 

1. 3 



0. 4 



1400 
1556 
100 
500 
638 

450 
600 

1300 
2328 

650 
1000 
2671 

700 



1300 
360 
900 
850 
780 

1081 
250 



3-05-51 
3-12-60 
3-14-59 
3-05-51 
3-10-56 

1 1-06-94 
3-10-47 
3-05-51 

3- 1 1-46 
3-08-58 
3-13-33 

10- 16-50 
3-13-44 3-10-53 
6-21-38 3-12-45 

1 1- 06-94 
1 1-06-94 

1 1-06-94 
3-17-52 
3-14-59 
3-10-56 
3-17-52 
3-08-43 
9-29-10 
3-14-59 

3-05-51 



78 



Street 
Harnden Street 
Harris Street 
Harvard Avenue 
Hathaway Road 
Hawthorne Road% 
High Street 
Hillside Way 
Hilltop Road 
Hobson Avenue 

Hopkins Street 

Jaquith Road 
Jones Avenue 
Judith Road 

Kelly Road 
Kendall Street 
Kiernan Avenue 
Kilmarnock Street 
King Street 
Kirk Street 
Lake Street 
Lang Street 
Laurel Avenue 
Lawrence Court 
Lawrence Street 
Ledgewood Road 
Liberty Street 
Lincoln Street 



From 
Main Street 
Burlington Avenue 
Main Street 
Woburn Street 
Woburn Street 
Middlesex Ave. 
Chestnut Street 
Suncrest Avenue 
Pine Avenue 

Shaw sheen Ave. 

Shaw sheen Ave. 
Glen Road 
Birchwood Road 

Adams Street 
Aldrich Road 
Main Street 
West Street 
Glen Road 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Bancroft Street 
Malloy Road 
Lawrence Street 
Glendale Circle 
Suncrest Avenue 
Federal Street 
Federal Street 



To 

Glen Road 
Cedar Street 
River Street 
Gunderson Road 

Woburn Street 
Burlington Line 



1 50 feet beyond 
Wiser Street 

Billerica Line 



Cedar Cre 3t Road 

Blanchard Road 

Reading Line 
Broad Street 

Shaw sheen Ave. 
B & M R. R. 
Parker Street 

Shady Lane Drive 

B & M R. R. 
B & M R. R. 
79 



Miles Feet Date(s) Accepted 



0. 1 



0. 5 
0. 5 



0. 5 



0. 5 



1.0 



700 
430 
1858 
230 



364 
1520 

1250 
719 
520 

923 
1300 
693 

2400 
572 

400 
657 
683 
3773 
383 
740 
720 



3-04-95 
3-12-45 
3-05-51 
3/51 3/53 3/59 
3-10-56 
11-06-94 
3-02-14 
3-14-59 

3/45 3/51 3/52 
1 1-06-94 

3-08-48 3/49 3/51 

6-10-40 

3-10-53 

3-09-57 

3-12-45 

3-08-58 
1 1-06-94 

6-10-40 3-12-45 

3-05-51 
1 1-06-94 

3-17-52 
10-16-50 

3-10-56 

3-10-56 

3-14-59 

3-08-43 

3-08-43 



ACCEPTED STREETS 



Street 
Linda Road 
Lloyd Road 
Lockwood Road 
Longview Road 
Lowell Street 

Mackey Road 
Main Street 
Marcus Road 
Marie Drive 
Marion Street 
Marjorie Road 
Massachusetts Ave 
McDonald Road 
Meadow Lane 
Middlesex Avenue 
Mile s Street 
Miller Road 
Morse Avenue 
Mystic Avenue 

Nassau Avenue 
Nichols Street 
Nicker son Avenue 
Norfolk Street 
North Street 

Oak Street 
Oakdale Road 



From 

High Street 
Main Street 
Ballardvale Street 
Middlesex Avenue 
Main Street 

Federal Street 
Tewksbury Line 
Cowing Road 

Woburn Street 
Burlington Avenue 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Salem Street 
Suncrest Avenue 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Glen Road 
Woburn Street 
Middlesex Avenue 

Shaw sheen Avenue 
Shaw sheen Avenue 
West Street 
Carter Lane 
Middlesex Avenue 

Salem Street 
Judith Road 



To 



Reading Line 

Woburn Line 
Cowing Road 
Thrush R oad 



St. Paul Street 



Salem Street 
Hobson Avenue 
Emerson Street 



Decatur Street 
Shawsheen River 

Nassau Avenue 
Dadant Drive 



Short Street 
80 



Mile s Feet Date( s) Accepted 



1.9 



4. 



2. 3 



0. 7 



1780 
1050 
990 
650 

250 

2315 

1285 
900 

1550 
800 

1424 
363 

400 
640 
1361 
598 

2000 

900 
538 
3533 

350 
2280 



10- 16-50 
3-05-51 
3-09-57 
3-14-59 

11- 06-94 

3-08-43 
11-06-94 

3-08-58 

3-11-61 

3-12-45 

3-05-51 

3-12-45 

3-13-44 

3-09-57 
1 1-06-94 

3-12-45 

3-12-45 

10- 16-39 
3-02-08 

3-11-46 

1 1- 06-94 
3-10-47 
3-13-54 

3-12-45 3-13-54 

3-19-51 
10-16-50 



ACCEPTED STREETS 



Street 
Oakridge Circle 
Oakwood Road 
Olson Street 

Park Street 
Parker Street 
Patricia Circle 
Pershing Street 
Phillips Avenue 
Pilling Road 
Pine Avenue 
Pineridge Road 
Pineview Road 
Pinewood Road 
Powder House Circle 

Railroad Avenue 
Ridge Road 
Rollins Road 
Roosevelt Road 
Royal Street 

Salem Street 
School Street 
Sewell Road 
Shady Lane Drive 
Shaw sheen Avenue 
Sheridan Road 



From 
Cowing Road 
Main Street 
Church Street 

Woburn Street 
Lowell Street 
Dell Drive 
Federal Street 
Wiser Street 
Hathaway Road 
Main Street 
North Street 
Lipp Street 
Birchwood Road 
Middlesex Avenue 

Clark Street 
Suncrest Avenue 
Fenway Street 
Boutwell Street 
Salem Street 

Tewksbury Line 
Middlesex Avenue 
Hathaway Road 
Middlesex Avenue 
Main Street 
Hathaway Road 



To. 

Cowing Road 
Fairfield Avenue 



N. Reading Line 
Blackstone Street 
Dell Drive 
B & M R. R. 
Wild Avenue 
Both ways 
Hobson Avenue 
Linda Road 
Adelman Road 
Shady Lane Drive 

Stone Street 

Marion Street 
Burlington Avenue 

N. Reading Line 
High School Lot 

Lawrence Street 
Billerica Line 



Mile s Feet Date(s) Accepted 
3-08-58 



1730 
850 
132 



0. 9 
0. 36 



0. 2 



2. 7 



2. 2 



595 
720 

1800 
930 
400 
900 
450 

1332 
730 

365 
200 
2000 
1040 

616 
380 
2676 

487 



3-11-46 
3-09-57 

1 1-06-94 
3-04-07 3-03-19 
3-08-58 
3-08-43 

3-11-46 3-13-54 

3-14-59 

3-12-45 

3-12-60 

3-10-53 

3-13-54 

3-13-54 

3-01-09 
3-10-56 
3-13-54 
3-1 1-46 
3-05-51 

11-06-94 3-05-06 

3-01-15 

3-12-55 

3-08-58 
11-06-94 

3-05-51 



81 



ACCEPTED STREETS 



Street 
Silver Lake Avenue 
Sprucewood Road 
State Street 
Strout Avenue 
Suncrest Avenue 
Swain Road 

Taft Road 
Taplin Avenue 
Temple Street 
Thrush Road 
Thurston Avenue 
Truman Road 

Upton Court 

Veranda Avenue 
Virginia Road 

Walker Street 
Warren Road 
Washington Ave. 
West Street 
Westdale Avenue 
Wightman Road 
Wild Avenue 
Wildwood Street 
Williams Avenue 
Wilson Street 



From 
Lake Street 
Shady Lane Drive 
Belmont Avenue 
Lowell Street 
West Street 
Forest Street 

Burlington Ave. 

Hobson Avenue 
Church Street 

Salem Street 
Church Street 
Hathaway Road 

Andover Street 

Main Street 

N. Reading Line 

Main Street 
Lake St. , Tewksbury 
Clark Street 
Woburn Street 
West Street 
Warren Road 
Grove Avenue 
Middlesex Avenue 
Main Street 
Federal Street 



To 

Dexter Street 
Short Street 
Fairview Avenue 



Burlington Ave. 

Boutwell Street 
Lubbers Brook 

Marie Drive 



Lubbers Brook 



Chase Street 
Reading Line 
B & M R. R. 
Albert Street 
B & M R. R. 
Woburn Street 

B & M R, R. 

82 



Miles Feet 
455 
600 
275 
686 
1246 

0. 4 

3237 
900 
274 

400 

0. 2 

300 

0. 1 

1076 
1200 

42 3 
100 

0. 3 

1. 7 

1211 
230 

0. 2 

1. 1 

693 
760 



Date(s) Accepted 
3-13-54 
3-17-52 
3-03-33 
3-17-55 
3-13-54 

3-20-22 10-16-29 

6-21-38 
3-1 1 -46 
6-06-1 1 
3-11-61 
3-04-07 
3-10-53 

11- 06-94 

3-06-16 
3-13-54 

3-08-58 
3-13-54 
3-01-20 
1 1 -06-94 
6-22-42 
3-13-54 

12- 29-10 
11-06-94 

6-10-40 
3-08-43 





A C C i 


: P T E D S T R S > 


: T S 






Street 


From 


To 






Miles Feet 


Date( s) Accepte 


Winchell Road 


Grove Avenue 


Burnap Street 






200 


3-12-45 


Wing Road 


Woburn Street 








746 


3-08-58 


Wiser Street 


Main Street 


Taplin Avenue 






900 


10-16-50 


Wcburn Street 


Andover Street 


Woburn Line 






4. 2 


1 1 -06-94 


Woodlawn Avenue 


Border Avenue 


Kensington Ave. 






250 


3-17-52 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



Dog Bites Reported 91 J 

Dogs Showing Physical Signs of Rabies f 

Animals Submitted to Laboratory for Examination 3 ' 



(All biting animals were quarantined for the period 
of time prescribed by law. ) 

Animals Quarantined 94 

Animals Released from Quarantine 94 

Dogs Released from Interstate Shipment 2 
Laboratory Report: 

Positive 

Negative 3 

Premises Keeping Domestic Animals Inspected 63 

Cattle Inspected 141 

Horses Inspected 65 

Swine Inspected 2453 

Goats Inspected 8 

Sheep Inspected 9 

Cattle Released from Interstate Shipment 

Cattle Reacting to the Tuberculin Test 



XI 



All special work assigned to me by the Department of Livestock 
Disease Control and the Board of Health was attended to promptly. 



SLAUGHTERING INSPECTOR: No slaughtering in Town 

No calls for personal livestock slaughtering 



83 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



Organization: 

The Wilmington Housing Authority is authorized by the General Laws, Chapter 121, Section 26K 
as amended. 

Member s: 

James P. Donahue, Chairman 
Edwin F. Forrest, Secretary 
Ernest B. Rice, Treasurer 

Statutory Reference: 

1. Housing Authority Law: Section 261 to 26CCC inclusive, of Chapter 121 of the General 
Laws, as amended. 

2. Act to Provide Housing for Veterans: Chapter 200 of the Acts of 1948, as amended. 

3. Act to Provide Housing for Elderly Persons of Low Income: Chapter 667 of the Acts of 
1954, as amended. 

Veteran's Housing: 

Location - Wildwood Street Number of Units - 13 Average Rent - $57. 50 

Rentals are based on the income of the veteran. This Project is entirely for veterans of the 

low income group of greatest need, who have been living under poor housing conditions. It allows the 

veteran to live in decent, safe and sanitary housing at a rent he can afford. 

Housing for the Elderly: 

Location - Deming Way Number of Units - 40 Rent - $48. 00 

Requirements for occupancy of these units is that a person must be sixty-five (65) years of age 
or over and must be of low income. Persons must also be in need of good housing. 





Balance Sheet for the 


Fiscal 


Year ended June 30, 1961 








200-1 
















Assets 








Liabilities 








Administration Fund 




1, 160. 


92 


Accrued Comp. to Members 




78 


03 


Petty Cash 




20. 


00 


Accrued Pilot 




70 


40 


Reading Coop. Bank 




2, 000. 


00 


Matured Interest & Principal 




128. 


60 


Mechanics Savings 




9. 052. 


50 


Security Deposit 




675. 


00 


Accounts Receivable 




515. 


15 


Bonds Authorized 198,000. 


00 






Prepaid Insurance 




77. 


81 


Less: Notes Retired 31,000. 


00 


167, 000. 


00 


Development Cost i 


;i98, 000. 00 






Debt Service Reserve 




5. 432. 


00 


Liquidated 


31, 000. 00 


167, 000. 


00 


Operating Reserve 




5, 869. 


28 














179, 253. 


31 


TOTAL 




179, 826. 


38 


Operating Deficit (Minus) 




573. 


07 










TOTAL 




179, 826. 


38 



84 



Ralph D. Peterson, Asst. Treasurer 
Edward J. Sullivan, Vice Chairman and Rep. 

of State Housing Board 



Balance Sheet for the Fiscal Year ended March 31, 1961 



667-1 Administration 

Assets 



Administration Fund 23,Z02. 12 

Petty Cash 20. 00 

Accounts Receivable 549. 00 

Prepaid Insurance 397. 76 

Accounts Receivable - Development 3,307. 15 

TOTAL 27,476.03 



Liabilitie s 

Prepaid Rent 
Operating Reserve 
Surplus 

Surplus 

TOTAL 



48. 00 
2, 880. 00 
13, 673. 66 
16, 601. 66 
10, 874. 37 

27, 476. 03 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 



The list of measuring devices and measures adjusted and sealed during the year is as follows: 



No. adjusted No. sealed 

Gasoline pumps 21 60 

Grease & oil pumps 18 

Vehicle tanks 12 23 

Taximeter 3 

Scales under 100 lbs. 10 25 

Large scales 7 

Liquid measures: 1 gal. or under 5 

Over 1 gallon 1 



85 



PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 




Police Station Dedication 



The Building Committee reports the completion of the Police Station and Highway Garage during 
the year 1961. Both buildings were constructed within the budget authorized by the Town. A dedication 
ceremony was held at the Police Station, and those who visited the building were able to see the modern and 
efficient facilities which have been provided to improve the ability of the Police Department to provide its 
services to the community. No formal dedication of the Highway Garage was held; however, the building ,[ 
is complete and provides all the necessities of the Highway Department for its functions. The Committee jl 
would again like to express its appreciation for the cooperation given by the Police and Highway Depart- I 
ments during the course of design and construction of these buildings. j| 

On November 28, I960 at a Special Town Meeting the construction of an Intermediate School in || 
North Wilmington was authorized, and work commenced on this structure in the late spring of 1961. The 
winter of 1960-1961 was quite severe, and due to the deep frost and snow accumulation an early start could 
not be made. The low bidder, L. Rugo, Inc. , however, has been able to maintain an approved rate of pro- 
gress, and it now appears that the building will be completed in the summer of 1962 several weeks prior to 
the opening of the school in early September. This building will provide the School Department with 
approximately 20 rooms; and if the current rate of progress is maintained, its opening will alleviate the 
classroom shortage expected in September of 1962. The School Department has informed the committee 
that the opening of this school on time will prevent the possibility of double sessions. 

The Committee noted in its report to the Town last year that it was impossible to forecast what 
effect a budget cut would have on the construction of this school. A review of the budget situation reveals 
the need of additional funds, and an article is incorporated in the warrant of the annual meeting to provide 
the required funds. 

The Boutwell Street Elementary School has been opened since October of I960, and as the Com- 
mittee stated in its report last year, certain desirable features such as a recreation area and improved site 
conditions could not be provided within the approved appropriation. The Selectmen, the School Department, l| 



86 



and the Building Committee have reviewed the status of this project and recommend that additional funds be 
appropriated to provide improved school and recreational facilities at this time. Funds for these improve- 
ments are incorporated in the article mentioned above. 

A minor modification of the ventilation system at the Glen Road Elementary School has been re- 
quested, and the Building Committee has incorporated the funds for this modification in the article relating 
to the North Intermediate and Boutwell schools. 

Your Building Committee has as a part of its responsibility a continuing study of the need for 
additional school accommodations, and with the cooperation of the School Department, reports that the open- 
ing of the North Intermediate School will relieve the shortage through September of 1964. It was thought 
earlier that an additional elementary school would be required in the North Wilmington area in September of 
1963; however, the School Department has reviewed the situation, and by means of utilizing every foot of 
space in all of its buildings, has been able to establish a schedule which will permit a postponement of a 
required North elementary school until September of 1964. The Building Committee is most appreciative 
of the efforts of the School Department, and the School Committee in working out this solution to the problem 
of classroom space. 

Therefore, it appears that a new 12 to 15 room elementary school will be required in the North 
Wilmington area in September of 1964, and a 12 room elementary school will be required in the West Wil- 
mington area in September of 1966. A second intermediate school will be required in 1968, and this also 
will be located in the West Wilmington area if present population trends continue. The situation on class- 
rooms, however, is so marginal that, if a large amount of residential building occurs in the Town, our 
school building situation could change immediately. 

On the basis of recommendations prepared by the Planning Board, the Building Committee has 
inspected several sites for the additional schools described above. To complete the necessary site evalua- 
tion, the Building Committee has incorporated an article in the warrant for the annual meeting to provide 
funds so that adequate surveys and subsurface investigations can be made prior to the necessity of recom- 
mending particular sites to a Town Meeting. The Committee believes that if these funds are appropriated, 
the task of selecting the most economical site available in a given area will be much easier, and much more 
information can be provided to assist the Town in making its decision. 

The Building Committee was organized in 1958 at the Annual Town Meeting and since then has 
had to start and complete projects on an extremely close schedule. The cooperation of the Board of Select- 
men, the School Committee, Superintendent of Schools, Town Manager and other officials of the Town has 
helped the Building Committee to meet its assigned objectives. With the postponement for one year of the 
construction of another elementary school, the Committee urges that the Town provide the funds needed to 
investigate fully all sites under consideration. This course of action will insure the best possible recom- 
mendations to a subsequent town meeting. 



87 



WARRANT FOR THE SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - FEBRUARY II, 1961 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



The meeting was called to order at 1. 45 p. m. The moderator read the warrant as follows: 

Greetings: [n the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the by- 
laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium on Saturday, the Eleventh Day 
of February next at 1. 30 p. m. to consider and act on the following Articles: - 

At this point Mr. Charles Black moved that further reading of the warrant be dispensed with. This was 
voted unanimously. Mr. Simon Cutter, moderator asked permission to refer to each article by number 
only. This request was granted. 

Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Rural to 
Industrial the following described parcel of land: Beginning at the intersection of the center line of Route 
125 and the center line of the right of way of the high voltage transmission line and running N 63° - 55' - 
30" E, 3260 feet along the center of Route 125, thence N 29° - 43' - 30" W, 1280 feet to a point; thence 
S 89° - 07' - 30" W, 5800 feet to a point at the intersection of the center line of high voltage transmission 
line right of way and the town line between Wilmington and Andover; thence along said right of way of the 
transmission line, S 49° - 19' E, 4410 feet to a point, thence still along center line of said right of way 
S 70° - 48' E, 485 feet to the point of beginning, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Planning 
Board, Town Manager and Board of Selectmen. 

Finance Committee approved Planning Board recommendation. Motion by Mr. Joseph J. Slater that the 
above article be adopted, and it was so voted, unanimously. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Rural to 
Industrial the following described parcel of land; Beginning at the intersection of the center line of Route 
125 and the center line of the right of way of the high voltage transmission line and running along the said 
center line of right of way S 70° - 48' E, 2800 feet to a point; thence N 48° - 10' E, 1425 feet to a point at 
the southeast corner of land owned by John Benevento; thence N 29° - 43' - 30" W, 2190 feet to a point on 
the center line of Route 125 thence along the said center line of Route 125 , S 53° - 55' - 30" W, 3260 feet 
to the point of beginning, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Planning Board, Town Manager 
and Board of Selectmen. 

Finance Committee approved Planning Board recommendation. Motion, Mr. Raymond Fitzmaurice moved 
the adoption of the above article, and it was so voted, unanimously. 



Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Rural to 
Industrial the following described parcel of land; Beginning at a point where a line parallel with, and at a 
distance of 200 feet east of the center line of Route 125 intersects with the easterly bound of land owned by 
Stephen Hathaway; thence running S 1° - 18' W, approximately 1180 feet along said property of Stephen 
Hathaway to a point; thence S 84°- 49 'E, approximately 95 feet still by land of Stephen Hathaway to a point; 
thence S 5°- 11' W approximately 1015 feet still by land of Stephen Hathaway to a point on the center line of 
the right of way of the abandoned track of the Boston and Maine Railroad; thence along the center line of 
said railroad N 57° -35' W approximately 1695 feet to a point where this line intersects the present Industrial 
Zone; thence still on a line of the present Industrial Zone N 33° - 16' E approximately 620 feet to a point; 
thence still on a line of the present Industrial Zone and parallel with Route 125, N 53° - 55' - 50" E approxi- 
mately 1335 feet to the point of beginning, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Planning Board, 
Town Manager and Board of Selectmen. 

Finance Committee approved Planning Board recommendation. Motion, Mr. Herbert Nickerson moved the 
adoption of the above article and it was so voted, unanimously. 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Single Resi- 
dence A to Industrial the following described parcel of land; Beginning at a point on the center line of the 



88 



abandoned track of the Boston and Maine Railroad where it intersects with the present Industrial Zone, and 
running along the center line of said railroad S 57^- 35' E, approximately 1535 feet to a point; thence 
S 62°- 25' W approximately 1100 feet on the property line on the easterly side of the land owned by the Town 
Land Development, Inc. , to a point on the center line of the right of way of Rojite 93; thence along said center 
line N 34°- 53' - 40" W, approximately 1100 feet to a point on the line of the present Industrial Zone; thence 
along the line of the present Industrial Zone N 33° - 16' E approximately 550 feet to the point of beginning, 
or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Planning Board, Town Manager and Board of Selectmen. 

Finance Committee approved Planning Board recommendation. Motion, Mr. Herbert Nickerson moved the 
adoption of the above article, and it was so voted, unanimously. 



Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map by changing from Single 
Residence A to Industrial the following described parcel of land; Beginning at the center line intersection 
of Burlington and Floradale Avenue and running in an easterly direction along center line of Burlington 
Avenue a distance of approximately 165 feet; thence in a southerly direction on a curve with a radius of 
3389 feet a distance of approximately 44 feet to a point; thence 5 42° - 30' E on a line parallel with the rail- 
road and 383 feet from the center line of right of way a distance of approximately 250 feet to a point; thence 
N 47° - 30' E a distance of 33 feet to a point; thence N 42°- 30' W approximately 250 feet on a line parallel 
with the railroad and 350 feet from the center line of railroad to a point at the beginning of a curve; thence 
on a curve with a radius of 3356 feet a distance of 668 feet still following the railroad, 350 feet from the 
center line to a point at the end of said curve; thence N 31° - 06' W, still 350 feet from the center line of 
right of way, a distance of approximately 785 feet to the intersection of said line parallel with the railroad, 
with the westerly boundary of the land owned by Magee Construction Co. Inc. , thence along said boundary 
line S 24°- 15' E approximately 1150 feet to a point; thence S 33°- 29' W approximately 343 feet to the 
point of beginning, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Planning Board, Town Manager and 
Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee approved Planning Board recommendation. Motion, Mr. J Banda 
moved the adoption of the above article and it was so voted, unanimously. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to adopt, ratify and confirm the names of all public streets and ways 
in the Town as set forth and appearing upon a map entitled, "Map of Wilmington, Massachusetts" dated. 
June 19, 1959, prepared under the direction of the Planning Board by Whitman & Howard, Inc. , Engineers, 
copies of which map are on file and available for inspection in the office of the Town Clerk, or do anything ir 
relation thereto. Request of the Planning Board. Finance Committee approved Planning Board recom- 
mendation. Motion, Mr. Raymond F. Fitzmaurice moved the adoption of the above article. Mr. F. Eichel 
moved to amend the street map by changing the street now named Hubbard Street back to its original name 
of Hardin Street. The Planning Board asked the moderator for a five minute recess so they could study 
this amendment. This was granted. 

Mr. Cutter asked the meeting to go on to Article 7, if there was no objection. No objection was offered. 
Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acquir- 
ing a site for an additional pumping station and well field for the Water Department and constructing and 
equipping a pumping station on such site and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise; and further to see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Selectmen or Board of Water Commissioners to purchase or take by eminent domain for such 
purposes certain parcels of land on Chestnut Street as shown on a plan dated November 14. I960 made by 
the Town Engineer and on file in the office of the Town Clerk, or anything in relation thereto. Request of 
the Board of Water Commissioners. 

Finance Committee recommend - that a total sum of $90, 000 be appropriated. $75. 000 of this total for the 
development of the well field, and the balance of $15, 000 for land damages. Motion by Mr. Waldo Stevens 
as follows: Moved - That the Board of Water Commissioners be and they are hereby authorized to pur- 
chase or take by eminent domain for the purpose of a site for an additional pumping station and well field 
for the Water Department, a certain tract of land on the southerly side of Chestnut Street supposed to con- 
tain about fifty-three acres, as shown on a plan dated November 14, I960, made by the Town Engineer and 
on file in the office of the Town Clerk, said tract being bounded and described according to said plan as 
follows: 



89 



Beginning at a point in the southeast sideline of Chestnut Street, thence running forty and thirty-three 
hundredths (40. 33) feet along said sideline on a bearing of S 37 - 38 - BOW; 

Thence S 45 - 00 - 00 E a distance of two hundred fifty-three and eleven hundredths (253. 1 1) feet by land 
nnarked on said plan of Wisdom E. Bell; 

Thence, still by said land of Wisdom E. Bell, on a curve the chord of which lies on a bearing of 
S 49 - 58 - 00 W and runs four hundred eighty-one and ninety-four (481. 94) feet to the center of Maple 
Meadow Brook; 

Thence running on a straight line in said Maple Meadow Brook having a bearing of S 35 - 33 - 30 E a 
distance of three hundred twenty-three and twenty-nine hundredths (323. 29) feet; 

Thence leaving said brook and running S 58 - 2-9 - 45 E by land of Lillian M. Galvin for a distance of four 
hundred thirty-six and thirty hundredths (436. 30) feet to another point in the same brook; 

Thence following the center line of said brook in a general southeasterly direction a straight line distance 
of about fourteen hundred (1400) feet by lands of Lillian M. Galvin and John J. Nitchie; 

Thence turning and running three hundred thirteen and twenty-one hundredths (313. 21) feet by land of 
Martin Nee and Margaret Skahon on a bearing of N 04 - 56 - 40 E; 

Thence on a bearing of N 88 - 23 - 50 E and still by land of Nee and Skahon a distance of four hundred 
sixty-five and eighteen hundredths (465. 18) feet; 

Thence still by said land of Nee and Skahon and on a bearing of N 00 .- 09 - 30 E a distance of three 
Hundred sixty-one and zero hundredths (361. 00) feet; 

Thence, and still by land of Nee and Skahon, N 06 - 55 - 50 E a distance of two hundred seventy-one and 
seventy-eight hundredths (271.78) feet; 

Thence one thousand six hundred ninety and sixty-six hundredths (1690. 66) feet on a line having a bearing 
of N 69 - 32 - 20 W and bordering on lands of Robert and Loretta Malatesta; Warren B. and Marguerite M. 
Dawe; and Angelo and Thelma Grassia; 

Thence on a bearing of S 45 - 14 - 20 W a distance of seventy-four and twenty-five hundredths (74. 25) 
feet by land of Walter Malatesta; 

Thence one hundred sixty-seven and six hundredths (167. 06) feet on a bearing of S 58 - 12 - 50 E by land 
of John J. Nitchie; 

Thence, again by land of John J. Nitchie; a distance of seventy-five and ninety-five hundredths (75. 95) 
feet on a bearing of S 32 - 24 - 50 W; 

Thence, again by land of Nitchie and on a bearing of S 24 - 58 - 30 E a distance of eighty and fifty-three 
hundredths (80. 53) feet; 

Thence, still by land of Nitchie and on a bearing of S 8 3 - 1 1 - 40 W a distance of three hundred fifty-four 
and forty-nine (354.49) hundredths feet; 

Thence on a curve having a radius of four hundred (400) feet and a chord of two hundred seven and twenty- 
four hundredths (207. 24) feet on a bearing of S 68 - 40 - 30 W still by land of Nitchie; 

Thence running by land of Nitchie and on a bearing of N 45 - 00 - 00 W a distance of two hundred fifty- 
eight and seventy- six hundredths (258. 76) feet to the point of beginning. 

Said area to contain 53. 00 acres. 

And that for the purpose of acquiring said land, and of constructing and equipping a pumping station on 
said site, there is hereby appropriated the sum of ninety thousand ($90,000) dollars, to meet which 
appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be and is hereby authorized to borrow a 
sum or sums not to exceed in the aggregate said amount, and to issue the bonds or notes of the Town there- 
for payable in not more than fifteen years. 

Motion as stated above voted, unanimously. 

Article 6 (continued): Motion on the amendment to change Hubbard Street to Hardin Street voted, 
unanimou sly . 

Amendment by Mr. Minot Anderson - "except that east of West Street, the location named Lowell Street 
shall be that shown on Sheet # 1 of the County Layout of 1908, copy of which is on file in office of the Town 
Engineer; and stopping at Route #93". Mr. Fitzmaurice asked Mr. Anderson whether or not he would 

consider withdrawing his amendment if the Planning Board agreed to correct this map in accordance with 
this amendment and take it up at future Special Town Meeting. Mr. Anderson agreed and withdrew his 
amendment. The maker of the second also withdrew his motion. The question on the main motion as 
amended was voted, unanimously. 

Nvimber of voters present at this meeting - two hundred nineteen (219). 
Motion to adjourn voted unanimously. Adjourned at 2. 40 p. m. 



90 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 4, 1961 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



To: Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

Greetings: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the by-faws 
of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in Town 
affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Cafeteria, Saturday, the 4th day of March, A. D. 1961 at 
9. 45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10. 00 a. m. and shall be closed at 8. 00 p. m. for the 
election of Town Offices: 



Article 1: One Selectman for the term of three years; One Selectman for the term of one year (to fill an 
unexpired term); Two Members of the School Committee for the term of three years; One Moderator for 
the term of one year; One Member of the Wilmington Housing Authority for the term of five years; One 
Member of the Wilmington Housing Authority for the term of two years (to fill an unexpired term). 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and 
meet in Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington on Satur- 
day, the 11th Day of March, A. D. 1961 at 1. 30 P.M. , then and there to act on the remainder of the articles 
in said Warrant. 



In accordance with the above, the meeting was called to order by the Warden, Mr. Harold E. Melzar, at 
9. 45 a. m. , as much of the Warrant as is noted above was read by the Clerk, and on a motion by Joseph P. 
Ring it was voted to dispense with further reading of said Warrant. 



The ballot boxes were examined by the Warden, Clerk and the Police Officer on duty. Both boxes were 
found to be empty and the register on each indicated 00000. Each ballot box was then locked and the keys 
given to the Police Officer. 

The election officers were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties. The ballots were delivered to 
the Ballot Clerks; one box of ballots properly sealed and said to contain six thousand (6000) ballots. 

The Polls were declared open at 10. 00 a. m. The Polls were declared closed at 8. 00 p. m. There were 
one thousand nine hundred eighty-three (1983) ballots cast. All of the ballots cast were sorted, counted, 
recorded and declaration thereof made, as by law is directed, and were for the following, namely: 



Selectman - Three years Voted 
Elected - Nicholas L. DeFelice, One Thousand One Hundred Seventy-one 1171 
Rene J. LaRivee, Seven Hundred Thirty-eight 738 
Blanks, Sixty -nine 69 

Others, Five 5 

1983 

Selectman - One Year (Unexpired Term) 

Elected - John D. Brooks, One Thousand Four Hundred Thirty-four 1434 
James P. Donahue, Five Hundred Three 503 
Blanks, Forty-three 43 

Others, Three 3 

1983 

School Committee - Three Years: 

Elected - Goerge G. Robertie, One Thousand One Hundred Seventy-nine 1179 
Arthur V. Lynch, One Thousand One Hundred Forty-seven 1147 
Glen E. Connolly, One Thousand Twenty-eight 1028 
Blanks, Six Hundred Six 606 

Others, Six 6 

3966 



91 



Moderator - One Year: Voted 

Elected - Simon Cutter, One Thousand Six Hundred Sixty-three 1663 

Blanks, Three Hundred Eighteen 318 

Others, Two 2 

1983 

Wilmington Housing Authority - Five Years : 

Elected - Ralph D. Peterson, Four Hundred One 401 

William F. Smith, Three Hundred Thirty-One 331 

Edwin F. Forrest, Sixty-five 65 

Blanks, One Thousand One Hundred Seventy-eight 1178 

Others, Eight 8 

1983 

Wilmington Housing Authority - Two Years: 

Elected - Edwin F. Forrest, Three Hundred Fifty-seven 357 

Ralph D. Peterson, One Hundred Fourteen 114 

William F. Smith, Ninety 90 

Blanks, One Thousand Four Hundred Sixteen 1416 

Others, Six 6 

1983 

A - K Ballot box register read - 1053 
I - Z Ballot box register read - 930 

1983 There was one spoiled ballot. 

All elected officials were present, and they were immediately sworn to the faithful performance of their 
duties by the Town Clerk. 

A true copy: (Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 

Attest: Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 11, 1961 - High School Gymnasium 



The adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. Simon Cutter, at 1 . 40 p. m. 
Reverend Edmund W. Croke led the meeting in prayer. 

Mr. Cutter suggested that the Warrant be read only as each article came up before the meeting. There 
being no objection, this procedure was followed. 

Article 2: To hear the reports of Committees and act thereon. 

A special report of the Ice Skating Rink Committee was read by Mr. Roland Wood. Motion: The committee, 
therefore, moves that the Town Manager be instructed to continue on with the appointment of a committee to 
investigate the possibility of a rink, with the said committee to report back to a future town meeting, however 
not later than the next annual Town Meeting, with definite recommendations concerning site location, type of 
constructions, and estimates of cost of construction. Voted. 

Report of High School Building Committee read by Mr. Fred T. Corum. No other reports were offered. 

Article 3: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year, beginning 
January 1, 1962 and to issue notes therefor payable within one year, all in accordance with Sections 4 and 
17, Chapter 44, of the General Laws. On a motion by Mr. Nicholas DeFelice the above article was 
adopted unanimously. 

Article 4: To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and salaries of 
the several Town Offices, and Departments, and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxa- 
tion, transfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

92 



Motion by Mr. William P. Curtin that the several and respective sums as recommended by the Finance 
Committee be raised and appropriated for the purposes set forth in Article #4, each item to be taken up and 
voted on separately, subject to amendment. Voted, unanimously. 



Accordingly the Following Amounts were Voted: Taxation 
General Government: 



Board of Selectmen $ 2,900.00 

Election Expenses (Motion to table this item until after Article #26 was acted on 



was LOST by a voice vote) 






1, 000. 


00 


Registrars of Voters 






2, 700. 


00 


Finance Committee 






700. 


00 


Town Manager 






17, 100. 


00 


Industrial Expenses 






1 , 200. 


00 


Town Accountant 






7, 847. 


00 


Town Treasurer 






6, 500. 


00 


Town Collector 






8, 278 


00 


Town Clerk 






4, 939 


00 


Board of Assessors 






14, 000. 


00 


Town Counsel 






3, 500. 


00 


Town Hall 






16, 800. 


00 


Planning Board 






1 , 200. 


00 


TOTAL: - General Government 






88, 664. 


00 


Protection: Persons & Property 










Police Department Salaries 






108, 000. 


00 


Police Department Expenses 






6, 975. 


00 


Police Station 






3, 970. 


00 


Fire Department Salaries 






95, 675. 


00 


Fire Department Expenses 






5,351. 


00 


Fire Department Outlays 






4, 000. 


00 


Fire Station 






4, 000. 


00 


Ambulance Expenses 






1 , 700. 


00 


Civil Defense 






500. 


00 


Constable 






100. 


00 


Dog Officer 






1 , 600. 


00 


Building Inspector 






9, 500. 


00 


Board of Appeals 






400. 


00 


Sealer Weights and Measures 






900. 


00 


Tree Warden Department 






8, 750. 


00 


Dutch Elm Control 






8, 950. 


00 


Gypsy Moth Control 






5, 680. 


00 


TOTAL: - Protection Persons & Property 






266, 05 1 . 


00 


Public Works: 










Town Engineer 






12, 875. 


00 


Highway Department Salaries 






49, 500. 


00 


Highway Department Expenses 






28, 500. 


00 


Road Machinery Account 






15, 950. 


00 


Chapter 90 Construction 






7, 000. 


00 


Chapter 90 Maintenance 






1, 500. 


00 


Chapter 81 Maintenance 






11, 000. 


00 


Snow & Ice Control 






26, 000. 


00 


Public Street Lights 






16, 000. 


00 


Parks (Planning Board) 






4, 355. 


00 


Cemeteries (Amendment - Voted to transfer $3, 775. 00 


from 


the sale of Cemetery Lots Acct. 






And raise by taxation (Yes 


140, 


No 136) 


24, 225. 


00 


TOTAL: - Public Works 






196, 905. 


00 



93 



Health It Sanitation: 
Board of Health 
Garbage Collection 
Public Dump 

TOTAL: Health & Sanitation 



Taxation 
19, 984. 00 
9, 000. 00 
16, 000. 00 
44, 984. 00 



On a motion by Mr. Roland Wood it was voted that every one who wishes to speak on an article shall come 
before the microphone. 



Charities 8t Veterans Aid: 
Administration, Public Welfare 
Assistance, Public Welfare 
TOTAL: Charities 

Veterans Aid & Benefits 



8, 385. 00 
97, 000. 00 
105, 385. 00 

21, 300. 00 



Schools: 

On a motion by Mr. William P. Curtin it was voted to raise and appropriate the sum of $944, 534. 96 for that 
portion of the cost of schools under the jurisdiction of the Town School Committee. 

General Control: 



Salaries 


22, 400. 


00 


Non-Salary Items 


3, 070. 


00 


Expense of Instruction: 






Salaries 


785, 058. 


75 


Non-Salary Items 


31,131. 


55 


Health: 






Salarie s 


9, 400. 


00 


Non-Salary Items 


1, 400. 


00 


Utilitie s 


18, 540. 


00 


Transportation 


45, 364. 


41 


Auxiliary Agencies 






Salaries 


3, 900. 


00 


Non-Salary Items 


15, 395. 


25 


Capital Outlay 


8, 875. 


00 


Sub-total: School Department 


944, 534. 


96 



Operation School Plant: - Amendment - Voted to transfer $11,776. 00 from estimated receipts 

from the Fire Insurance Reimbursement of Buzzell School and raise by taxation 
Vocational Training 
TOTAL: Schools 



148, 224. 00 
4, 000. 00 
1, 096, 758. 96 



Library & Recreation: 

Public Library (Amended to read) 

Recreation Commission 
TOTAL: Library & Recreation 

Unclassified &i Reserve : 
Reserve Fund 
Insurance 

Training, Conference & Out-of-State Travel 
Town Report 

Tax Title & Legal Assistance 
Town Clock 

TOTAL: Unclassified & Reserve 



15, 019. 75 
7, 385. 00 
22, 404. 75 



20, 000. 00 
32, 475. 00 
1, 200. 00 
3, 000. 00 
500. 00 
100. 00 
57, 275. 00 



Maturing Debt &c Interest: 

Principal - Voted to transfer from available funds $80, 000. 00 and raise by taxation 



219, 000. 00 



94 



Maturing Debt & Interest: Taxation 
Interest & Fees - Voted to transfer from Water Available Surplus - $65,264. 65, Premium 
Sale of Bonds - $1, 758. 00, Accrued Interest, Sale of Bonds - $1, 136. 68, and raise by- 
taxation 42, 379. 27 
TOTAL: Maturing Debt & Interest 261 , 379. 27 



GRAND TOTAL: $2,161,106.98 

Budget: By Taxation - 2,161,106.98 

By Transfer - 163, 710. 23 

Total Budget - 2,324,817.21 

Article 5: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Thousand Dollars ($1000. 00) 
for the observance of Memorial Day and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange and have 
charge of such observance, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved $1, 000. 00. 
Upon a motion by Mrs. W. Drew the above article was adopted, $1, 000. 00 to be raised by taxation and 
appropriated for the observance of Memorial Day. Voted unanimously. 

Article 6: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750. 00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. , in Wilmington for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Finance Committee approved $750. 00. Mr. DeFelice moved the adoption of the above article 
to be raised by taxation. After a lengthy discussion a motion to close arguments was voted unanimously. 
The moderator read the motion again and a voice vote was taken. Since the chair was in doubt a standing 
vote was taken. Yes - 197, No - 97. Motion carried. 



Article 7: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750. 00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Nee -Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, 
or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved $750. 00. Mr. Black moved the adoption 
of the above article to be raised by taxation and appropriated for the above purpose. Voted unanimously. 

Article 8: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money under the authority of 
Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, as amended, for the purpose of providing suitable quarters for 
the William F. Tattersall Chapter No. 106, Disabled American Veterans, located in Wilmington, Mass. , or 
do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved $750. 00. Mr. Kidder moved the adoption 
of the above article, $750. 00 to be raised by taxation and appropriated for the above purpose. Voted 
unanimously. 

Article 9: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred Dollars ($100. 00) 
the money to be expended under the direction of the 4-H Town Committee, serving in co-operation with the 
Middlesex County Extension Service, under the provisions of Sections 40 to 45, Chapter 128, General Laws, 
of Massachusetts, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved $100. 00. Mr. Black 
moved the adoption of the above article to be raised by taxation, and appropriated for the above purpose. 
Voted unanimously. 

Article 10: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purchase of two vehicles for the use of the Police Department and authorize the 
sale or turn-in of the two present vehicles used by the Police Department, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved $2, 500. 00. Mrs. Drew moved the adoption 
of the above article, $2, 500. 00 to be raised by taxation and appropriated for the above purpose. Voted 
unanimously. 

Article 1 1: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purchase of a truck for the use of the Highway Department and authorize the 
sale or turn-in of a truck presently used by the Highway Department, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved $2,000. 00. Mr. Kidder moved the adoption 



95 



of the above article $2, 000. GO to be raised by taxation and appropriated for the above purpose. Voted 
unanimously. 

Article 12: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of laying 
water mains of not less than 6 inches, but less than sixteen inches in diameter on specified streets in accord- 
ance with the recommendations of the Board of Water Commissioners acting under the provisions of Chapter 
332, of the Acts of 1955, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by trans- 
fer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the 
Board of Water Commissioners. Finance Committee approved $48, 000. 00. 

Motion by Mr. Waldo Stevens: I move that the Town vote to appropriate and raise by borrowing the sum of 
$48, 000. 00 for the purpose of laying water mains of not less than six inches, but less than sixteen inches in 
diameter under the provisions of Chapter 332 of the Acts of 1955 for certain distances on the following streets: 
Lawrence Street, Marcia Road, Butters Row, and/or in such other streets as may be decided by the Board 
of Water Commissioners, and to meet such appropriation that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to issue bonds or notes of the town therefor, payable in not more 
than 1 5 years. 

Amendment by Mr. Stanley Webber to consider each street separately and vote on each street separately. 
Standing vote: Yes - 115, No - 98, Carried. 

Lawrence Street - by bond issue - $5, 000. 00 Voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 
Marcia Road - after some discussion a standing vote was taken - Yes - 76, No - 124, Lost. 
Butters Row - After a long discussion during which the Moderator relinquished the chair to Mr. Buzzell in 
order that he could speak on the a motion, a motion to close debate was lost and so declared by Mr. Buzzell. 
Further debate followed after which a standing vote was taken as follows: Yes - 24, No - 153, Lost. 

At 5. 35 p. m. a motion to adjourn to 7. 30 p. m. was lost. 

Article 13: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds, and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of the Town Manager. Mr. Black moved the adoption of the above article, $1, 756. 45 to 
be raised by taxation and appropriated for the above purpose. Voted unanimously. 

At this point in the meeting the presence of a quorum was questioned. The Tellers counted two hundred 
twenty-four (224) voters present. One hundred fifty voters constitute a quorum. The moderator declared 
a quorum was present and proceeded to the next article in the warrant. 

Article 14: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds a sum of 
money not to exceed Three Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($3, 500. 00) and appropriate the sum for hot 
topping Avenues in Wildwood Cemetery as far as the money will permit, or take any action in relation thereto. 
Request of the Cemetery Commissioners. Finance Committee approved $3, 500. 00. Mr. DeFelice moved 
the adoption of the above article, $3, 500. 00 to be raised by taxation and appropriated for the above purpose. 
Voted unanimously. 

Article 15: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds 
for the purchase of a lawn mower for the use of the Cemetery Department, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Cemetery Commissioners. Finance Committee approved $1, 500. 00. On a motion by 
Mrs. Drew it was voted to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $1, 500. 00 for the above purpose. 

Article 16: To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Marcia Road as approved 
by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the assessment of 
Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned 
is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by 
the right of eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect 
the purpose of this article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said way and for 
the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements there- 



96 



for, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee approved 
$16, 300. 00. 

Motion by Mr. Kidder that the town vote to accept as a public way the layout of Marcia Road as stated in the 
article and that the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow the sum of 
$16, 300. 00 and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor payable within five years as stated above for 
which this money is raised. 

Mr. Sullivan moved to amend the motion by adding "shall not be done until water is put in street under Water 
Department Commissioners. " Mr. Sullivan further amended the motion by moving to "lay on the table" 
the original motion and the amendments. Voted unanimously. 

At 5. 50 p. m. Mr. Sullivan asked for a recess until 7. 30 p. m. The question was put to a vote by voice and 
was LOST. 

Article 17: To see if the Town will vote to accept the Extension of Carson Avenue as a public town way as 
laid out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to a plan filed with the 
office of the Town Clerk, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance 
Committee approved. On a motion by Mr. Black it was voted to adopt the article as above. 

Article 18: To see if the Town will vote to accept Marie Drive as a public town way as laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to a plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk, 
or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee approved. On 
a motion by Mr. Black it was voted to adopt the article as above. 

Article 19: To see if the Town will vote to accept Thrush Road as a public town way as laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to a plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk, 
or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee approved. On 
a motion by Mr. DeFelice it was voted to adopt the article as above. 

Article ZO: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds 
and appropriate for the purpose of laying a sewer main from the Woburn Street sewer to the M. D. C. trunk 
line or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved 
$2, 000. 00. Motion by Mr. Charles Black: 1 move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appro- 

priate the sum of Two Thousand Dollars ($2, 000. 00) for the purpose of laying a sewer main from the Woburn 
Street sewer to the M. D. C. trunk line. Voted unanimously. 

Article 21: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds 
and appropriate for the purchase of a front-end loader and back-hoe for the use of the Water Department, or 
do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. Finance Committee 
approved $17, 000. 00. On a motion by Mrs. Drew it was voted to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum 
of $17, 000. 00 for the above purpose. 

Article 22: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation from available funds a sum of money not to 
exceed Three Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($3, 500. 00) and appropriate the sum for hot topping around 
the Police Station or take any action in relation thereto. Request of the Police Chief. Finance Committee 
approved $3, 500. 00. Upon a motion by Mr. Donald Kidder it was voted to raise by taxation and appropriate 
the sum of $3, 500. 00 for the above purpose. 

Article 23 : To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds 
and appropriate for the purpose of installing a drainage system on Powder House Circle, or do anything in 
relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. Finance Committee approved 
$2, 000. 00. Upon a motion by Mr. Charles H. Black it was voted to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $2, 000. 00 for the above purpose. 

Article 24 : To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the improvement, 
development and maintenance of the Ipswich River (Chapter 91 Project) or take any action in relation thereto. 
Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. Finance Committee approved $10, 000. 00. Upon a 



97 



motion by Mr. Nicholas L. DeFelice it was voted to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $10,000 for 
the improvement, development and maintenance of the Ipswich River (Chapter 91 Project). 



Article 25: To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington by adding a section 
as follows: "Chapter III - Section 22 - Whenever any Board, Commission, Committee or Town Officer shall 
officially advertise in any publication, a copy of said advertisement shall appear in a newspaper published 
and sold in the Town of Wilmington, if any, otherwise in a newspaper published and sold in the County of 
Middlesex. " Request of Larz Neilson and others. Finance Committee Disapproved. 

Motion by Larz Neilson: I move that the Town amend the By-laws by adding a s.ection as follows: "Chapter 
III - Section 22 - Whenever any Board, Commission, Committee or Town Officer shall place a legal adver- 
tisement in accordance with the provisions of the General Laws or of any special act or law including the 
By-laws or regulations of the Town of Wilmington in any publication, but specifically excluding promotional 
advertising, a copy of said advertisement shall appear in a newspaper published and sold in the Town of 
Wilmington, if any, otherwise in a paper published and sold in the County of Middlesex, provided however; 
that the cost of such advertisement in a newspaper published and sold in the Town of Wilmington shall not 
exceed the average cost of legal advertisements published in newspapers in towns contiguous to the Town of 
Wilmington. 

Mr. Neilson asked the opinion of the Town Counsel, Mr. Buzzell on his motion. Mr. Buzzell ruled that 
Mr. Neilson was adding certain requirements to a State Statute and therefore this was an illegal article. 
Mr. Cutter, moderator, agreed with the Town Counsel that he too considered this an illegal article there- 
for no action could be taken. 

Article 26: To see if the Town will vote to establish an additional voting precinct within the Town of 
Wilmington, bounded and described as follows: Beginning at the junction of the Wilmington, Tewksbury and 
Billerica Town lines, southerly by the Billerica line to Aldrich Road; easterly from the Billerica line, in- 
cluding both sides of Aldrich Road, to Shawsheen Avenue; thence southeasterly on Shawsheen Avenue, in- 
cluding both sides of the avenue, to Bridge Lane; thence easterly on Bridge Lane, including both sides of the 
lane, across Main Street to the junction of Glen Road and the so-called "Wildcat" railroad tracks; north- 
easterly and parallel with the railroad tracks to the junction of the Town lines of Andover, Wilmington and 
Tewksbury, and then southwesterly along the Tewksbury line to the point of beginning, or do anything in 
relation thereto. Request of Edward J. Sullivan and others. Finance Committee disapproved. 

Motion by Edward J. Sullivan: I move that the Town vote to establish an additional voting precinct within 
the Town of Wilmington, bounded and described as follows: Beginning at the junction of the Wilmington, 
Tewksbury and Billerica Town lines, southerly by the Billerica line to Aldrich Road; easterly from the 
Billerica line,* including both sides of Aldrich Road, to Shawsheen Avenue; thence southeasterly on Shaw- 
sheen Avenue, including both sides of the Avenue, to Bridge Lane; thence easterly on Bridge Lane, including 
both sides of the Lane, across Main Street to the junction of Glen Road and the so-called "Wildcat" railroad 
tracks; northeasterly and parallel with the railroad tracks to the junction of the town lines of Andover, 
Wilmington and Tewksbury, and then southwesterly along the Tewksbury line to the point of beginning. 
Finance Committee Disapproved. 

Mr. DeFelice asked Mr. Buzzell about the legality of this motion. Mr. Buzzell ruled that the article and 
motion were invalid because they were contrary to statute. The Selectmen should bring this article to a 
Town Meeting. The moderator also stated that this article was invalid; therefor no action could be taken. 

Motion to adjourn - voted. Adjourned at 7. 00 p. m. Total number of voters checked on the voting list - 



418. 



Total Voted as follows: 



By Borrowing 
Grand Total 



By Taxation 
By T ransfer 



2, 210,213. 43 
163, 710. 23 
5, OOP. 00 
2, 378, 923. 66 



Estimated Tax Rate 



$68. 00 



A true copy: 
Attest: 



(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



98 



WARRANT FOR THE SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - JUNE 5, 1961 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



The meeting was called to order at 9.25 p. m. due to a lack of a quorum at 8. 00 p. m. Mr. Cutter thanked 
those who waited so patiently for the meeting to begin. 

Mr. Cutter asked the meeting to rise in a moment of silent prayer for Mr. Harry Ainsworth, former 
Wilmington Chief of Police, Constable and dear friend to all, whom we lost recently. 

The Moderator read the warrant as follows: 

Greetings: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-laws 
of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified by law to vote 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium, Church Street on Monday, the 
Fifth Day of June next at 8. 00 p. m. to consider and act on the following Articles - 

At this point in the reading of the warrant Mr. Charles Black moved that further reading be dispensed with. 
Voted unanimously. Mr. Cutter asked permission to refer to each article by number only, instead of 
reading each article. No objections were offered. 

Article 1: To see if the Town will vote to accept Ainsworth Road as a public town way as laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to a plan filed with the office of the Town 
Clerk, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to receive as a gift, or to purchase, or to take by Right of 
Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage and other easements as may be necessary to effect the pur- 
pose of the Article. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and determine how 
such appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds in the treasury or 
otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee 
approved. Recommend the transfer of $100. 00 from Sale of Real Estate Account. On a motion by Mr. John 
Brooks the above article was VOTED unanimously and to effect the purpose of this Article to transfer and 
appropriate the sum of One Hundred Dollars ($100. 00) from the Sale of Real Estate Fund Account. Voted. 

Article 2: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of laying 
water mains of not less than 6 inches, but less than 16 inches in diameter on specified streets in accordance 
with the recommendations of the Board of Water Commissioners acting under the provisions of Chapter 332, 
Acts of 1955, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of 
Water Commissioners. Finance Committee approved. Recommend the raising by bond issue not to exceed 
$7, 200. 00 for the purpose of laying water mains on Ainsworth Road. 

Motion by Mr. Waldo A. Stevens: I move that the Town vote to appropriate and raise by borrowing the sum 
of $7, 200. 00 for the purpose of laying water mains of not less than six inches, but less than sixteen inches 
in diameter under the provisions of Chapter 332 of the Acts of 1955 for certain distances on Ainsworth Road 
and/or in such other streets as may be decided by the Board of Water Commissioners, and to meet such 
appropriation that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized 
to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, payable in not more than 15 years. By standing vote - 
Yes - 118, No - 5. Motion carried. 

Article 3: To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to consummate an exchange of property between 
the Middlesex County National Bank, and the Town, each conveyance to be the full and sole consideration for 
the other, upon the following basis: 

The Town, acting by its Selectmen, is to convey to said Middlesex County National Bank a triangular parcel 
of land situated on Church Street, bounded and described as follows: Southeasterly by Church Street, 148 
feet, according to plan hereinafter mentioned; Southwesterly by land of said Bank 82. 25 feet, according to 

> said plan; Northerly partly by Olson Street and partly by lot 2, as shown on said plan, 127. 32 feet more or 

I less. 



99 



The above described parcel is shown on plan entitled, "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Massachusetts, 
August 31, i960, Schofield Brothers, Reg. Civil Engineers, " filed at the Land Court with Registration Case 
No. 3031 1. Said parcel is to be conveyed subject to and reserving the rights of the Town in Olson Street 
acquired by taking dated March 18, 1957 and duly recorded. 

Said Bank is to convey to the Town a certain parcel of land situated on Church Street, bounded and described 
as follows: Southeasterly by Church Street, 62. 50 feet; Southerly by land of the Town 79. 24 feet; South- 
westerly by the northeasterly sideline of Olson Street, as shown on plan hereinafter mentioned, 61. 98 feet; 
and Northerly by other land of the Town, 166. 50 feet. 

Said parcel is shown as lot 2 on plan entitled "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Massachusetts, August 31, I960, 
Schofield Brothers, Reg. Civil Engineers" filed at the Land Court with Registration Case No. 3031 1. Said 
parcel is shown to contain 5352 square feet according to said plan and is part of the premises conveyed to 
the said Bank by deed dated June 7, I960, recorded with Middlesex North District Deeds Book 1478, Page 
360, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee approved. 
Mr. Nicholas DeFelice moved the adoption of the above article. 

At this point a quorum was challenged. The Tellers counted One Hundred Sixty-three (163) voters present. 
The Moderator declared a quorum was present. 

The motion on the adoption of the above article was voted unanimously. 

Article 4: To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and appropriate the sum of $242. 60 
for the purpose of paying an unpaid bill of a previous year, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of 
the Board of Health. Finance Committee approved transfer of $242. 60 from E & D account. On a motion 
by Mr. Donald Kidder the above article was voted, unanimously. 

Motion to adjourn, voted. Adjourned at 9.45 p.m. Voters checked on voting list - 179. 

A true copy: (Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 

Attest: Town Clerk 



100 



W A R R ATSf T 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



TO: A. John Imbimbo, Constable of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By- 
laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in 
Town affairs to meet and assemble at the 

HIGH SCHOOL CAFETERIA 
Saturday, the 3rd Day of March, A. D. 1962 

at 9. 45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10. 00 A. M. and shall be closed at 8. 00 P. M. , for 
the election of Town Offices: 

ARTICLE 1: Two Selectmen for the term of three years; Two Members of the School Committee for the 
term of three years; One Moderator for the term of one year; One Member of the Wilmington Housing 
Authority for the term of five years and vote on the following Question: 

QUESTION #1: "Shall the fluoridation of the water supply of the Town of Wilmington be continued''" If a 
majority of the votes in answer to said question is in the affirmative the fluoridation of the water supply of 
said town shall be continued; otherwise it shall be discontinued. YES NO 



You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and 
meet in Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington 

on 

Saturday, the 10th Day of March, A. D. 1962 
at 1. 30 P. M. , then and there to act on the following Articles: 
ARTICLE 2: To hear the reports of Committees and act thereon. 

ARTICLE 3: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year, beginning 
January 1, 1963 and to issue notes therefor payable within one year, all in accordance with Sections 4 and 
17, Chapter 44, of the General Laws. 

ARTICLE 4; To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and Salaries 
of the several Town Offices, and Departments, and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by 
taxation, transfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 5: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Thousand Dollars ($1000) 
for the observance of Memorial Day and that the Moderator appoint a Committee who shall arrange and have 
charge of such observance, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 6: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750. 00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. , in Wilmington for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 7: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750. 00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing 



101 



ARTICLE 7 (continued): suitable headquarters for the Nee -Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign 
Wars of the United States, or do anything in relation thereto. 



ARTICLE 8: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of nnoney under the authority of 
Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, as amended, for the purpose of providing suitable quarters for 
the William F. Tattersall Chapter No. 106, Disabled American Veterans, located in Wilmington, Mass. , or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 9: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred Dollars ($100) 
the money to be expended under the direction of the 4-H Town Committee, serving in cooperation with the 
Middlesex County Extension Service, under the provisions of Sections 40 to 45, Chapter 128, General Laws 
of Massachusetts, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 10: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purchase of two vehicles for the use of the Police Department, and authorize 
the sale or turn-in of the two present vehicles used by the Police Department, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 11: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of lay- 
ing water mains of not less than 6 inches, but less than 16 inches in diameter on specified streets in accord- 
ance with the recommendations of the Board of Water Commissioners acting under the provisions of Chapter 
332, Acts of 1955, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board 
of Water Commissioners. 

ARTICLE 12: To see if the Town will vote to accept Public Law 560, 83rd Congress, as amended, and that 
the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners be authorized to enter into negotiations with the Administrator 
of the Housing and Home Finance Agency to apply for Federal Funds and that the Board of Water and Sewer I 
Commissioners be authorized to expend the same for test well investigations, plans, and reports, with 
estimates of cost of improvements to the Town water supply, with the understanding that the Town will re- 
imburse the Federal Government for that part of the cost of the investigations allocated to a particular waterr, 
supply project, if and when that particular water project is subsequently voted by the Town, said investiga- 
tions to be made by an engineer approved by the administrator, and that the Town authorizes the Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen to borrow from the United States Government, under the terms of Public 
Law 560, as amended, for the purpose of making said investigations for the Town of Wilmington, Mass. 
Request of the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners. 

ARTICLE 13: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of lay- 
ing a water main of not less than 6 inches, but less than 16 inches in diameter on Butters Row in accordancei 
with the recommendations of the Board of Water Commissio srs acting under the provisions of Chapter 332, 
Acts of 1955, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of 
Water Commissioners. 

ARTICLE 14: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds, and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in re- 
lation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 15: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds a sum of 
money not to exceed Three Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($3, 500) and appropriate the sum for hot topping 
Avenues in Wildwood Cemetery as far as the money will permit, or take any action in relation thereto. 
Request of the Cemetery Commissioners. 

ARTICLE 16: To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Marcia Road as approved: 
by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the assessment of 
Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned 
is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by the( 
right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect th4 



102 



purpose of this article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by- 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said way and for 
the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements there- 
for, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 17: To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of River Street as approved 
by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the assessment of 
Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned 
is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by the 
right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the 
purpose of this article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said way and for 
the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements 
therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 18: To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Pleasant Road as approved 
by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the assessment of 
Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned 
is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by the 
right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the 
purpose of this article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said way and for 
the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements 
therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 19: To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Hamlin Lane as approved 
by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the assessment of 
Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned 
is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by the 
right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect 
the purpose of this article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said way and for 
the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements there- 
for, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 20: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the reconstruction 
of a part of Salem Street and Ballardvale Street as shown on a plan on file with the Town Clerk, or take any 
action in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE Zl: To see how much money the Town will raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds, 
and appropriate for the purchase of an Accounting Machine for the use of the Town, or do anything in rela- 
tion thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 22: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds, the sum 
of Five Thousand Dollars ($5, 000) and appropriate the sum for the purchase of a tractor, with attachments, 
for the use of the Cemetery Department or take any action in relation thereto. Request of Francis E. Downs. 

ARTICLE 23: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purchase of a front-end loader and back-hoe for the use of the Highway Dept. 
or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 24: To see if the Town will assume liability in the manner provided by Section 29 of Chapter 91 
of the General Laws, as amended by Chapters 516 and 524, Acts of 1950, for all damages that may be in- 
curred by work to be performed by the Department of Public Works of Massachusetts for the improvement, 
development, maintenance and protection of tidal and non-tidal rivers and streams, harbors, tidev/aters, 
foreshores and shores along a public beach outside of Boston Harbor, including the Merrimack and Connec- 
ticut Rivers, in accordance with Section 1 1 of Chapter 91 of the General Laws, and authorize the Selectmen 
to execute and deliver a bond of indemnity therefor to the Commonwealth, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. 

103 



ARTICLE 25: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the improvement, 
development and maintenance of the Ipswich River (Chapter 91 Project) or take any action in relation thereto. 
Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 26: To see if the Town will vote to place upon the Town Map, adopted at a Special Town Meeting 
February 11, 1961; Lowell Street from Sts 7 + 50 to 14 + 50 as laid out by the County Commissioners in 1908; 
according to a plan on file with the Town Engineer; and change name of this section of Lowell Street to Lowell 
Street Park; or do anything in relation thereto. Street numbers shall remain as at present. Request of 
Albert J. Kelly and others. 

ARTICLE 27: To see if the Town will vote to change the term of the office of Town Moderator from one 
year to three years, and if so voted, to take effect at the annual election of March 1963. Request of Simon 
Cutter. 

ARTICLE 28: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Single 
Residence A District to Industrial District, the following described parcel of land: A certain parcel of land 
bounded: Northerly by Lowell Street, one thousand one hundred eighteen and 96/100 (1, 118.96) feet; 
Easterly by the center of the Maple Meadow Brook; Southerly by land of Yentile, six hundred seventy-two 
and 23/100 (672.23) feet, more or less; Easterly still by land of Yentile, two hundred fifteen and 64/100 
(215. 64) feet; Southerly still by land of Yentile, one hundred sixty and 75/100 (160. 75) feet; and Westerly by 
land now or formerly of Samuel P. Pike, three hundred eighty-eight and 54/100 (388. 54) feet. All as shown 
on Plan No. 27556A, Sheet No. 1, filed with Certificate of Title No. 10603, or do anything in relation thereto. 
On petition of Alan Altman and others. 

ARTICLE 29: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Building By-law, Division 9 - Fire Protection, by 
adding a new section to read: 'Section 13. Any part (as rooms, passages, closets) of any building which 
extends within eight feet of any lot line shall be of first class construction. Any part of any building which 
extends within twelve feet of any lot line shall be of first class or second class construction. The Board of 
Appeals shall grant no variances or special permit altering these provisions until ten (10) days after they 
have requested a report of the location from the Fire Chief, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of 
the Building Inspector. 

ARTICLE 30: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Building by-law. Division 15 - Garages, by striking 
out Section 3 and inserting in place thereof the following section: 'Section 3. No private garage shall be built 
to hold more than three (3) cars. Second class garages shall be placed not less than eight feet from property 
line. Garages placed less than eight feet from the property line shall be of first class construction. Garages 
of third class construction shall not be placed less than fifteen feet from the lot line and not less than fifteen 
feet from any building with combustible walls and/or outer covering, ' or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Building Inspector. 

ARTICLE 31: To see if the Town will vote to amend the •' j/iing By-law and Map by changing from Neigh- 
borhood Business District to General Business District, the following described parcel of land: A certain 
parcel of land shown as Lot 123 on a plan known as "Wilmington Estates, North Wilmington, owned and 
developed by John D. Cooke, dated July, 1938, " Davis & Abbott, Civil Engineers, recorded with the Middle- 
sex North District Registry of Deeds, Book of Plans 61, Plan 76, and bounded and described as follows: 
Northerly by Middlesex Avenue, one hundred eighteen (118) feet; Easterly by Lot 122 as shown on said plan, 
one hundred fifty-five and 67/ 100 ( 155. 67) feet; Southerly by Lot 121 as shown on said plan; one hundred 
sixty-three (163) feet; more or less; and Westerly by Lubbers Brook, as shown on plan, or do anything in 
relation thereto. On petition of Barbara A. Moorman and others. 

ARTICLE 32: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to enter into and fully perform on be- 
half of the Town an agreement with Robert G. & Bernice A. Cowie providing as, follows: 

1. That Robert G. and Bernice A. Cowie will convey to the Town a parcel of land owned by them on Ballard 
vale Street described as follows: A parcel of land with the buildings thereon bounded easterly by Ballardvale 
Street- 75 ft. , southerly by land of the Town of Wilmington - 150 ft. , westerly by land now or formerly of 
Signore - 75 ft. , and northerly by said last mentioned land - 150 ft. Being the same premises conveyed to 
Robert G. and Bernice A. Cowie by Samuel S. Thorpe and wife by deed recorded with Middlesex North 



104 



District Registry of Deeds, Book 1317, Page 395. 



Z. That in consideration for such conveyance, the Town will pay in cash or partly in cash and partly in con- 
veyance to said Robert G. and Bernice A. Cowie a parcel of land on said Ballardvale Street owned by it and 
described as follows: 

Beginning at an iron pipe inside the stone wall at the northwest corner of lot near land of Frank J. Melanson, 
thence running along Ballardvale Street S 15°- 35' E, 125.00 feet; thence S 67° 05' W, 181. 50 feet by land of 
the Town of Wilmington; thence N 15"* 35' W, 125. 00 feet by land of Frank J. Melanson to the point of beginn- 
ing, containing 22, 500 square feet. Other details of such agreennent to be at the discretion of the Selectmen. 

The object to such agreement being to provide further land for the location of the Intermediate School con- 
struction of which was provided for at the Special Town Meeting held November 28, I960. Any funds neces- 
sary for its performance to be supplied from the funds previously appropriated for said school, or do any- 
thing in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 33: To see if the Town will vote to raise a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or otherwise and appropriate the same for the purpose of completing the construction 
and equipping and furnishing the North Intermediate School, the Boutwell Street Elementary School and the 
Glen Road Elementary School, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Permanent Building 
Committee. 

ARTICLE 34: To see if the Town will vote to raise a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or otherwise and appropriate the same for expenditure by the Permanent Building Com- 
mittee for the purpose of undertaking engineering surveys and subsurface explorations of parcels of land to 
be considered for acquisition for additional school sites in accordance with the provisions of Article 43 of 
the Annual Town Meeting of 1958, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Permanent Building 
Committee. 

ARTICLE 35: To see if the Town will vote to amend the building laws of the Town - by adding thereto a new 
division which shall read: "Division 20 - Gas Piping and Appliances Regulations. "Section 1 - the Mass. 
Code for Installation of Gas Appliances and Gas Piping' established under Chapter 737, Acts of I960, is the 
gas piping code of the Town of Wilmington. 

"Section 2 - There shall be in the building department, under the supervision and direction of the Building 
Inspector, one or more inspectors of gas piping and gas appliances in buildings (to be known as 'gas in- 
spectors' and one alternate gas inspector. They shall be appointed annually by the appointing authority, aftei 
consultation with the Building Inspector, and each shall be qualified by training and actual experience in gas 
piping. The Plumbing Inspector may also serve as Gas Inspector or as alternate. None shall inspect or 
pass on his own work. The principal duty of gas inspectors is the enforcement of the Mass. Code; and any 
other regulations established by the Board established under Chapter 25, Section 12H G- L. 

"Section 3 - Gas installers shall register before doing any gas piping or installing any gas appliances in 
Wilmington. Regulations for registering gas installers shall be formulated by the senior Gas Inspector and 
the Building Inspector, and shall become effective upon filing a copy with the Town Clerk, and publishing in 
a local newspaper. For ninety (90) days after this section becomes effective, registration in any town or 
city within 15 miles will be accepted as meeting this requirement. 

"Section 4 - Permits are required for all piping or connecting of any gas appliances, and must be applied for 
before commencing work. Applications 'dropped' at the Inspector's office during non-working hours will 
meet this requirement. Permits will be issued only to registered gas installers. Permits will be issued by 
the Building Inspector. Only fully portable appliances used in construction operations or commercial and 
industrial equipment may be connected by flexible gas tubing. 

"Section 5 - Fees will be set by the Building Inspector and the senior Gas Inspector, and after approval by 
the appointing authority, filing with the Town Clerk, and publishing, shall become effective. Fee includes 
only the first inspection; each inspection after the first shall be charged at not less than two dollars ($2. 00). 
Seventy per cent of the fee shall be paid to the Gas Inspector inspecting same. It is the declared intent that 



105 



the fees shall be set so that the Inspector will realize at least the journeyman rate for his time plus his 
mileage at the going rate. 

"Section 6 - Penalties - Penalties as provided by Chapter 143 G. L. , Section 3N, are hereby adopted. " 

and further to see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum not to exceed $750. 00 for the above purpose; 
or take any other action to carry out the provisions of Chapter 143, Section 30 G. L. Request of the Building 
Inspector. 

ARTICLE 36: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Single 
Residence A District and Neighborhood Business District to General Business District thereby extending the 
existing General Business District the following described parcel of land; Beginning at a stone Mass. High- 
way Bound at the northwest corner of 1957 taking of Route 93 and Lowell Streets; thence Northerly 520. 06' 
on an arc along the western boundary of Route 93 to a stake; thence South 82P48' 44" West: 581. 59' to a stake 
at end of a stone wall; thence South 55°45' 00" West: 289. 15' along a stone wall to a drill hole at intersection 
of stone walls; thence Southerly: 165.83' along a stone wall to stone bound at Lowell Street: thence Easterly: 
along the northerly line of Lowell Street as laid out in 1908 and 1957 to point of beginning; or do anything in 
relation thereto. On petition of Minot J. Anderson and others. 

ARTICLE 37: To see if the Town will direct the Selectmen to prepare a division of the Town into convenient 
voting precincts in accordance with the General Laws (Tercentenary Edition) under the provisions of Chapter 
54, Section 6, as amended, or do anything in relation thereto. On petition of Edward J. Sullivan and others. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant, or a certified copy thereof, with your doings thereon to 
the Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 



GIVEN UNDER OUR HANDS AND SEAL OF SAID TOWN this 
NINE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-TWO. 



day of February, A. D. , ONE THOUSAND 



John Brooks 
Charles H. Black 
Nicholas L. DeFelice 
Wavie M. Drew 
Donald C. Kidder 



Board 
of 

Selectmen 



106 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



ANALYSIS OF THE CASH ACCOUNT - for the year ending December 31. 1961 

RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR 1961 

Balance as at January 1, 1961 

Add: Cash receipts January 1 through December 31, 1961 

Deduct: Cash Expenditures during 1961 
Balance on Hand as at December 31, 1961 - carried to 1962 

ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIVED 





338. 741. 


12 


5, 


707, 419. 


04 


6, 


046, 160. 


16 


5. 


164. 002. 


30 




882. 157. 


86 



TAXES 



Tax Collections 
Prior years' 



4, 
63, 



Current year's levy: 



levy: Poll 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 

Poll ~5, 
Personal Property 85, 
Real Estate 1 , 563, 

Farm Animal Excise: I960 Levy 

1961 Levy _ 
Betterments Added to Taxes: 

Prior Years: Water Assessments 

Street Assessments 
Water Assessment Interest 
Street Assessment Interest 
Current Levy: Water Assessments 

Street Assessments 
Water Assessment Interest 
Street Assessment Interest 
Unapportioned Water Assessments 
Apportioned Water Assessments Paid in Full 
Deferred Water Assessments Paid in Full 
Apportioned Street Assessments Paid in Full 
Estimated Street Betterments Paid in Advance 
Water Liens Added to Taxes: 
Prior Levies 
Current Levy 
Tax Titles Redeemed 



100. 00 
094. 70 
297. 17 



782. 00 
170. 97 
601. 10 



33. 38 
229. 97 



903. 35 
78. 67 

681. 79 
57. 25 



934. 12 
826. 57 
341. 28 
542. 99 



67, 491. 87 

1, 654, 554. 07 
263. 35 

1, 721. 06 



7, 644. 96 
984. 84 
6, 557. 13 
1, 287. 08 
880. 94 
351.31 

697. 20 
5, 286. 63 



1, 722, 309. 29 



19 427. 32 



5, 983. 83 
9, 017. 50 



AMOUNTS BORROWED 



Short Term: 

To pay expenditures of Town Depts. until taxes 

are collected 
To carry on Chapter 81 & 90 Contract work 
until State & County reimbursements are 
received 

Temporary Loans /Anticipation of Serial Issue 
Long Term: 

Proceeds from Sale of Bonds - 
Water Betterment Bonds 



900, 000. 00 



63, 325. 00 
400, 000. 00 



1, 363. 325. 00 



12, 200. 00 



107 



North Intermediate School Bonds 
Chestnut Street Wellfield 



1, 050, 000. 00 
90, 000. 00 



2. 515, 525. 00 



GRANTS AND GIFTS 



Federal Grants: 
Charities: 



Aid to Dependent Children, Aid 
Aid to Dependent Children, Admin. 
Old Age Assistance, Assistance 
Old Age Assistance, Admin. 
Disability Assistance , Assistance 
Di sability As si stance , Admin. 
Medical Assistance for Aged, Aid 
Medical Assistance for Aged, Admin. 
Schools: 
Public Law 874 
National Defense Act P 3/864 
Public Grants: 

Construction Grants -in-Aid (Highways) 
Comm. of Mass. - Chap. 81 & 90 
Middlesex County Treasurer - Chap. 90 



18, 434. 55 
2, 343. 84 



35, 410. 


14 


2, 798. 


85 


3, 312. 


60 


362. 


49 


24, 983. 


48 


1, 060. 


97 



20, 778. 39 

38, 208. 99 

3, 675. 09 

26, 044. 45 

25, 992. 00 
3, 468. 14 



706. 92 



29, 460. 14 



35, 500. 72 
7, 248. 32 



118, 167. 06 



42, 749. 04 



AGENCY AND TRUST FUNDS 

Federal Withholding Tax Deductions 
State Withholding Tax Deductions 
Retirement System Deductions 
Blue Cross /Blue Shield Deductions 
Group Life Insurance Deductions 
U. S. Savings Bonds Deductions 

Dog Licenses, Collector for Middlesex County Dog Officer 
Fish & Game Licenses, Collected for Dept. of Conservation 
Cemetery Trust Funds 



187, 025. 44 
14, 988. 90 
28, 363. 62 
13, 571. 05 
4, 298. 18 
487. 50 
2, 774. 25 
2. 477. 50 
725. 00 



254, 71 1. 44 



RECEIPTS AVAILABLE FOR APPROPRIATION - But Not Appropriated 



Repayments, Middlesex County Dog Officer 

Refunds to Appropriations 

Recoveries O. A. A. Lien Law 

Accrued Interest - Sale of Bonds 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 

Sewer Guaranteed Deposits 

Water Available Surplus 

Overpayment of Sewer Maintenance Assessment 
Refunds to Petty Cash Advances 
Water Department: 

Water Rates 

Water Services 
Sewer Rentals 



2, 122. 81 
2, 510. 12 
14, 285. 35 
4, 876. 74 
347. 67 
722. 69 
584. 21 
183. 56 
20. 00 



29 



1, 



126, 126. 28 
3, 297. 82 



129, 424. 
13,512. 



10 
00 



198, 589. 25 



RECEIPTS RESERVED FOR APPROPRIATION - RESTRICTED USES 



Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 
Sale of Real Estate Fund 



4, 340. 00 
617. 73 



4. 957. 73 



REVOLVING FUNDS 



School Lunch Program Receipts 

High School Athletic Association Receipts 



106, 567. 45 

4, 461. 35 



111, 028. 80 



108 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



Income Taxes: 

Schools G/L Chap. 70 

Town's Allocation 
Corporation Taxes 
Motor Vehicle Excise Collections: 

Prior Years' Levy 

Current Year's Levy 
Licenses, Li4Uor 
Meal Tax, State Treasurer 
Loss of Taxes, State Treasurer 
Interests and Costs: 

Tax Titles Redeemed 

Tax Collections 

Accrued Interest/Temp. Loans 
General Government: 

Selectmen's Receipts 

Town Collector's Receipts 

Town Clerk's Receipts 

Planning Board's Receipts 
Protection of Persons and Property: 

Police Dept. Receipts 

Building Inspector: 
Building Permits 
Wiring Permits 
Plumbing Permits 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Public Works: 

Town Engineer 

Highway Department 

Snow & Ice Removal /State 

Cemetery Receipts 
Board of Health: 

Public Nurse's Receipts 

Health & Sanitation Receipts 

Tuberculosis Reimbursements /State 
Charities & Soldiers Benefits: 

General Relief, A/R 

Old Age Assistance. A/R 

Aid to Dependent Children, A/R 

Disability Assistance , A/R 

Medical Assistance for Aged, A/R 

Rent of Quarter s /Welfare Dept. 

Burial of Indigent Persons/State Treasurer 

Charities Administration Reimb. /State Treas. 

Veterans Services, A/R 
Schools and Libraries: 

School Construction Reimbursements /State 

School Transportation Reimbursements/State 

Vocational Training R eimbur sements /State 

Division of Child Guardianship/State 

Adult Evening School Tuition/Cities & Towns 

Adult Evening School Tuition/Town 

Miscellaneous High School Receipts 

State Aid to Libraries 

Library Receipts 



1, 119. 00 
1, 489. 00 
982. 00 



3, 193. 25 
21, 255. 62 
9, 728. 80 
5, 591. 21 
14, 935. 53 



166, 902. 66 
5, 102. 00 



65, 956. 65 
153, 901. 41 



722. 90 
5, 800. 19 
17. 31 

425. 50 
1, 278. 00 
2, 971. 90 



220. 75 



3, 590. 00 
170. 75 

102. 00 
105. 00 
1, 639. 09 

4. 133. 25 

421. 00 
1, 71 1. 00 
91. 43 



54, 704. 41 
468. 36 
40. 00 
3, 298. 75 
20, 494. 10 

110, 845. 00 
23, 963. 50 
3, 181. 76 
16, 128. 13 
697. 80 
1, 01 1. 80 
611.80 
2, 619. 75 
1, 088. 35 



172, 004. 66 
25, 125. 00 



219. 858. 06 
4, 000. 00 
3, 623. 78 
69. 35 



6, 540. 40 



4, 675. 40 
60. 00 



3. 981. 50 



5. 979. 34 



2, 223. 43 



79, 005. 62 



156. 439. 79 
3, 708. 10 



109 



Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Insurance Reimbursements & Claims: 

Fire (Buzzell School) 1 1 

Burglary (High School) 
Accident Claims - Vehicles 
Workmen's Compensation Recoveries 
Dividends 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co. Commissions 

(Pay Phones) 
Town's Share State Withholding Tax Deductions 
Fourth District Court Fines 

Contractor's Forfeited Bid (New Elementary School) 



782. 
222. 
200. 
157. 
2, 219. 



02 
68 
00 
86 
93 



14, 582. 49 

70. 92 
94. 94 
110. 00 
2 800. 00 



17, 658. 35 



TOTAL RECEIPTS FOR YEAR ENDING 12/31/61 



5, 707, 419. 04 



ANALYSIS OF FEDERAL GRANTS 





Balance s 
as at 
1/1/61 


Grants 
Received 
in 1961 


Expenditure s 
During 
1961 


Balance s 

as at 
12/31/61 


Char itie s: 
















Aid to Dependent Children, Aid 
Aid to Dependent Children, Admin. 


10, 811. 
282. 


47 
05 


18, 434. 
2, 343. 


55 
84 


21, 530. 
1, 857. 


26 
80 


7,715. 76 
768. 09 




1 1, 093. 


52 


20, 778. 


39 


23, 388. 


06 


8, 483. 85 


Old Age Assistance, Assistance 
Old Age Assistance, Admin. 


1, 705. 
5, 194. 


90 
33 


42, 023. 
2, 798. 


68 
85 


36, 928. 
4, 779. 


82 
13 


6, 800. 76 
3,214. 05 




6, 900. 


23 


44, 822. 


53 


41, 707. 


95 


10, 014. 81 


Disability Assistance, Aid 
Disability Assistance , Admin. 


- 524. 
559. 


68 
35 


3, 312. 
362. 


60 
49 


2, 213. 
796. 


18 
20 


574. 74 
125. 64 




34. 


67 


3, 675. 


09 


3, 009. 


38 


700. 38 


Medical Assistance for Aged, Aid 
Medical Assistance for Aged, Admin. 









24, 983. 
1, 060. 


48 
97 


12, 793. 
796. 


67 
20 


12, 189. 81 
264. 77 









26, 044. 


45 


13, 589. 


87 


12, 454. 58 


Schools: 
















Special Account P/ 1 874 

National Defense Education P/L 85/864 


4, 838. 
473. 


38 
81 


25, 992. 
3, 468. 


00 
14 


25, 568. 
473. 


89 
81 


5, 261. 49 
3, 468. 14 




5,312. 


19 


29, 460. 


14 


26, 042. 


70 


8, 729. 63 



1 10 



ANALYSIS OF THE MATURING DEBT 





Balance s 


Added 


Paid off 


Balance 




1/1/61 


1961 


1961 


12/31/6 


riign ocnooi i->oa,n Act jc, i / 4 r 










5>Z DD , (JUL) . UU 


115, 000 




15, 000 


100, 000 


Elem. School Loan, Wildwood School 










kj / bee. lU, Chap. 44, ^bl^:, 000. 00 


325, 000 




25, 000 


300, 000 


i: ire / r^oiicc oLdtion j_-iOa.n, o / x-- oG c . i u 












O C AAA 
, UUU 




5, 000 


20, 000 


Public Sewer Mains, G/L Sec. 10 










Chap. 44, !}) I 06, 000. 00 


76, 000 




15, 000 


61 . 000 


ot. Const. r>onas( l7->D) 0/J_^ bee. 10 










Chap. 44, $30, 000. 00 


7, 000 




7, 000 


None 


ot. Const. r5onas( IVbo) C/L bee/ 10 










Chap. 44, $60, 000. 00 


48, 000 




6, 000 


42, 000 


ot. Const, oonas (IVoU) C / bee. 10 










Chap. 44, $13,000.00 


13, 000 




5, 000 


8, 000 


r'ublic WorKs oldg. & Police bta. Bonds 










G/L Sec/ 10, Chap. 44, $140, 000. 00 


126, 000 




14, 000 


112, 000 




735, 000 




92. 000 


643. 000 


OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT: 










rilgn bcnooi l^oan, Acts :)Zl/4/ 










(tonn nnn nn 

^>cOv, 000. 00 


100, 000 




10. 000 


90, 000 


Aaa. oiAiter. Jr/br Hign bcnooi, 










Acts d4d/4o, $1,375,000.00 


1 , 035, 000 




80, 000 


955 000 


Aaa. &Alter. Jr/br riigh bchool, 










Acts D4b/4o, $400,uU0.U0 


360, 000 




20. 000 


340. 000 


Cien Koad bcnooi Bonds, Acts 










^Ati / AQ <t/ltA AAA AA 

D4D/4i3, 4)4I3U, UUU. UU 


yi n n nnn 

400, 000 




25, 000 


375. 000 


i50utweii ot. ocnool. Acts d4d/4o 










<t/lAA AAA AA 
4>4UU , UUU. uu 


yi n n nnn 

400, 000 




25, 000 


375, 000 


North Intermediate School, Acts 










AAC^//1Q <tl ACA AAA AA 
04D/40, 5)1,UDU,UUU.UU 




1 , 050, 000 


None 


1 , 050, 000 


rirst Water Main Ext. , bee. o 










V, A A AAA AA 

Chap. 44, $f3, 000. UU 


5, 000 




5, 000 


None 


Water rSonas, INew Welliield, 










Q /^l A A <t^A AAA 

bee. o. Chap. 44, $dU,UUO 


30, 000 




5, 000 


2 5, 000 


Water Meters, Improving Exist. 










System & Betterments, See. 8, 










Chap. 44, $145,000.00 


89 , 000 




18, 000 


7 1 , 000 


Water btandpipe Bonds, See. 8, 










Chap. 44, $152, 000. 00 


130, 000 




10, 000 


120. 000 


Water Main Bonds ( 1957), Sec. 8, 










Chan 44 $35 000 00 


^ J , U \J \J 




1^ nnn 

J , \j yj \j 


7 A nnn 


Water Main Bonds (1958) See. 8, 










Chap. 44, $50, 000. 00 


42, 000 




4. 000 


38, 000 


Water Main Bonds (361) Sec. 8, 










Chap. 44, $5, 000. 00 




5, 000 




5. 000 


Water Main Bonds (661) Sec. 8, 










Chap. 44, $7, 200. 00 




7. 200 




7. 200 


Water Bonds, New Wellfield, Sec . 8 , 










Chap. 44, Chestnut St. , $90, 000. 00 




90, 000 




90. 000 




2, 616, 000 


1, 152, 200 


207. 000 


3, 561 , 200 


COMBINED TOTALS 


3,351, 000 


1, 152. 200 


299. 000 


4, 204, 200 



1 1 1 



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DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES OTHER THAN THAT RAISED FROM 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE YEAR ENDING 12/31/61 



REFUNDS : 
Taxe s 

Prior Years 
Current Levy 
Poll Tax 
Real Estate 
Personal Property 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 
Prior Years 



1, 721. 54 

16. 00 
9, 029. 04 
1, 287. 74 

2, 935. 52 



State & County Assessments: 

County Hospital Assessment 4, 574. 17 

County Tax Assessment 19, 358. 94 

County Retirement Assessment 26, 312. 70 

State Parks Assessment 4,879.68 
State Audit Assessment 5,483.21 

Agency & Trust Funds: 
Carter Lecture Fund 
Blue Cross /Shield 
Withholding Deductions, Federal 
Withholding Deductions, State 
Retirement System Deductions 
Group Insurance Deductions 
Dog Licenses Due County 

Fish & Game Licenses Due Dept. Conservation 
Cemetery Trust Funds 
U. S. Savings Bonds 
Town Functions (Not Appropriated): 
School Lunch Program 
High School Athletic Association 

Water Dept. Maintenance & Operation HI, 107.05 

Water Betterments - 1961 7,723.02 

Water Improvements 28, 65 1 . 59 

Street Betterments - 1961 

Additions & Alteration Jr/Sr High School 

Construction Glen Road School 

Construction Boutwell St. School 

Construction Wildwood School 

Construction North Intermediate School 

Construction Fire/Police Station 

Construction New Police Station 



12, 054. 32 



Current Levy 


6, 720. 06 


9, 655. 


58 


Water Assessments Added To Taxes 




40. 


65 


Water Assessments Paid in Advance 




5. 


70 


Water Interest Added in 1961 




18. 


91 


Water Rates 




245. 


86 


Water Services 




32. 


87 


Water Guaranteed Deposits 




5, 283. 


13 


Water Available Surplus 




1, 012. 


21 


Sewer Guaranteed Deposits 




219. 


75 


M. D. C. Sewer Charges 




23, 831. 


83 


Interest & Costs 




15. 


41 


Tax Title 




12. 


73 


Sale of Cemetery Lots 




25. 


00 



50, 245. 81 

10, 362. 89 

400. 00 
13, 571. 05 
187, 025. 44 
14, 988. 90 
28, 363. 62 
3, 710. 57 
2, 768. 25 
2, 542. 50 
725. 00 
487. 50 



105, 876. 


02 


4, 569. 


26 


147, 481. 


66 


2, 768. 


74 


10, 791. 


14 


4, 276. 


59 


48, 390. 


09 


2, 300. 


00 


574, 200. 


44 


40. 


00 


75. 


00 



52, 453. 95 



60, 608. 70 



254, 582. 83 



900, 768. 94 



116 




Federal Grants & Aid: 
P. L. 85/864 

P. L. 874 - Federal Aid To Schools 
Aid to Dependent Children, Aid 
Aid to Dependent Children, Admin. 
Old Age Assistance, Assistance 
Old Age Assistance, Admin. 
Medical Assistance Aged, Aid 
Medical Assistance Aged, Admin. 
Disability Assistance, Aid 
Disability Assistance, Admin. 

Temporary Loans: 

Anticipation of Revenue /Taxes 
Anticipation of Serial Issue/Loans 
Anticipation of Reimbursement/Highway 



3,879. 89 
25, 568. 89 



21, 530. 


26 


1. 857. 


80 


36,928. 


82 


4, 778. 


13 


12, 793. 


67 


796. 


20 


2,213. 


18 


796. 


20 



29, 448. 78 
23, 388. 06 
41, 706. 95 
13, 589. 87 
3, 009. 38 



900, 000. 00 
400, 000. 00 
38, 700. 00 



TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL LEDGER ACCOUNTS 

TRUST FUND ACCOUNTS - Year Ending 12/3 1 /61 



111, 143. 04 



1, 338, 700. 00 
2, 718, 257. 46 



Cemetery Trust Funds: 

Woburn Five Cent Savings Bank 
Andover Savings Bank 
Mechanics Savings Bank 

S. D. A. Carter Lecture Fund: 
Woburn Five Cent Savings Bank 
Mechanics Savings Bank 

Burnap Library Fund: 
Andover Savings Bank 

Benjamin Buck Library Fund: 
Andover Savings Bank 

Charlotte C. Smith Library F\ind: 
Mechanics Savings Bank 

Sears, Cook, Walker-Walker 

School Library Fund: 

Mechanics Savings Bank 

Chester M. Clark Library Fund: 
Mechanics Savings Bank 

Sabra Carter Common Fund : 
Andover Savings Bank 

East Wilmington Improvement 

Association Library Fund: 

Mechanics Savings Bank 



On Hand 
as at 
1/1/60 


Trusts 
Added 
1961 


Interest 
Received 
1961 


With- 
drawals 
1961 


Balance 
on Hand 
12/31/61 


534. 43 
2, 627. 1 1 
19, 574. 23 


775. 00 


29. 84 
99 22 

7 7. t-< 

680. 50 


703. 79 


564. 27 
2 726.3 3 
20, 325. 94 


2, 767. 13 
5, 234. 96 




154. 98 
184. 81 




2, 922. 1 1 
5, 419. 77 


278. 01 




10. 51 




288. 52 


693. 18 




26. 23 




719. 41 


769. 32 




27. 15 




796. 47 


303. 95 




10. 71 




314. 66 


1, 028. 93 




36. 30 




1, 065. 23 


292. 83 




11. 05 




303. 88 


3, 820. 00 




134. 86 




3, 954. 86 


37, 924. 08 


775. 00 


1, 406. 16 


703. 79 


39, 401. 45 



117 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1961 

ASSETS 



Cash 

Petty Cash Advances 
Taxes: 

Prior Levies: 
Poll 1958 
1959 
I960 

Personal Property 



82, 157. 86 
285. 00 



1958 
1959 
I960 
1956 
I960 



Real Estate 

Current Levy : 
Poll 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 
Farm Animal Excise I960 
1961 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 
Prior Levies 1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 

Current Levy 
Special Assessments 

Prior Levies: I960 

Water Assess. Added to Taxes 
Street Asses. Added to Taxes 
Comm. Interest Water Added to 
Taxes 

Comm. Interest Street Added to 
Taxes 
Current Levy : 

Water Assess. Added to Taxes 
Street Assess. Added to Taxes 
Comm. Water Int. Added to Taxe 
Comm. St. Int. Added to Taxes 
Unapportioned Water Assessments 
Water Liens I960 
1961 

Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions 
Water Department 
Water Rates 
Water Services 
Charities & Soldiers Benefits A/R 
General Relief 
Aid to Dependent Children 
Old Age Assistance 
Aid to Highways /State & County A/R 
County Aid to Highways 
State Aid to Highways 
Unprovided/Overdrawn Accounts: 
Overlay 1955 
1956 
1958 
1959 
I960 

Due from Carter Lecture Fund Account 
Street Betterments - I960 
Overdrafts 1961 Appropriations: 

Fire Station Maintenance 

Snow & Ice Removal 

Veterans Benefits 

Vocational Training 



30. 


00 


44. 


00 


1 20. 


00 


29. 


70 


417. 


60 


872. 


00 


69. 


90 


17, 861. 


25 


250. 


00 




C D 


77, 767. 


13 


O 1 

c. 3 . 


DO 


79. 




DtD . 


C J 


427. 


79 


1, 283. 


00 


4, 467. 


74 


40, 891. 


90 


228. 


08 


73. 


21 


229. 


96 


52. 


72 


387. 


74 


85. 


80 


s 489. 


71 


59. 


74 



194. 00 

1, 319. 30 
17,931. 15 

83, 005. 38 
103. 32 



47, 615. 66 



583. 97 



1, 022. 99 



2. 80 
11. 60 

4. 00 
2, 981. 00 
5, 384. 40 



289. 58 
1, 488. 71 
42, 402. 13 
20, 353. 33 

21, 061. 03 
2, 126. 34 

3, 093. 52 
3, 568. 60 
1, 495. 65 

15, 101. 68 
43, 584. 61 



8, 383. 80 
1, 146. 00 
40. 78 

73. 10 
16, 734. 43 
22, 526. 65 
8. 25 



151, 775. 77 
3, 145. 70 

1, 778. 29 

62, 755. 46 

23, 187. 37 

8, 157. 77 
58, 686. 31 



48, 913. 01 



TOTAL ASSETS 



1, 240, 842. 54 



118 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1961 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Temporary Loans/Anticipation of Reimbursement 

Accrued Interest Sale of Bonds 

Water Available Surplus 

Sale of Real Estate Fund 

Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 

Road Machinery Fund 

School Lunch Program 

High School Athletic Association 

Federal Grants /Schools: 

George Barden Fund 

Public Law 874 

Public Law 85/864 
Federal Grant s /Charitie s: 

Aid to Dependent Children 



137. 00 
5, 261. 49 
62. 06 



Old Age Assistance 
Disability Assistance 
Medical Assistance for Aged 



Aid 7,715.76 
Administration 768. 09 

Assistance 6,800.76 
Administration 3,215.05 
Assistance 574. 74 

Administration 125. 64 

Aid 12, 189. 81 

Administration 264. 77 

Tax Possessions - Duplicate Sales 
Redemption of Assigned Tax Titles 
Tailings - Unclaimed Checks 

Recoveries - Aid to Dependent Children - Aid & Old Age Assistance 
Agency Accounts: 

Group Life Insurance 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 

Dog Licenses Due County 
Reserve Fund Overlay Surplus 
Overlay Account 1961 
Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 
Reserved Until Collected, Revenue: 

Motor Vehicle Excise Revenue 

Tax Title Revenue 

Departmental Revenue (Charities & Vets. Benefits) 
Water Revenue 

Farm Animal Excise Revenue 

Special Assessment Revenue 
Estimated Street Betterments/Paid in Advance 
Appropriation Accounts - Non-Revenue 

Water Betterments 

Water Development, Chestnut St. Well Field 
Water Improvements /Barrows Well Field 
Boutwell Street, School Construction 
Additions fa Alterations Jr/Sr High School 
Construction of Athletic Field 
Glen Road School Construction 
Wildwood School Construction 
North Intermediate School Construction 
Construct Municipal Garage 
Construct Fire/Police Bldg. 
Construct & Equip New Police Bldg. 
Appropriation Accounts - Revenue General 
Encumberances Carried to 1962 
Planning Board 

Police Dept. - Care of Grounds 
Fire Dept. - Outlay, Radios 
Civil Defense 

Chapter 90 Construction - I960 
1961 

Chapter 91 Project Ipswich River 

Relocate Boutwell Street 

Hobson Avenue Drainage 

Construct fa Equip Dog Pound 
Surplus Revenue 
Relocate Crossing Gates 

Overestimates - State & County Assessments: 
County Tax Assessment 
State Audit Assessment 
State Parks Assessment 
Sewer Charges 



8, 483. 85 
10, 015. 81 
700. 38 
12,454. 58 



1, 876. 51 
1, 631. 80 
60. 50 



47, 615. 66 
62, 755. 46 

8, 157. 77 
24, 965. 66 
103. 32 

4, 752. 66 



6.239. 31 
74, 403. 30 

3, 326. 82 
2, 764. 68 

4, 106. 37 
4, 036. 61 

888. 46 
2, 999. 55 
475, 799. 56 
318. 73 
260. 18 
54. 83 

6, 242. 71 

2, 000. 00 
800. 00 

2,013. 80 
271. 87 
156. 00 

8, 677. 14 
10, 000. 00 

6, 770. 86 

6, 689. 57 

3, 000. 00 



15. 13 
855. 72 
775. 18 
22.481.93 



63, 325. 00 
4, 876. 74 

63, 421. 84 
9. 137. 73 
4, 315. 00 
180. 25 
2, 988. 82 
3, 342. 93 



5, 460. 55 



31, 654. 62 
201. 74 
51.81 
514. 94 
481. 15 



3, 568. 81 
32. 02 
2, 654. 90 

285. 00 



148, 350. 53 
351.31 



575, 198. 40 



46, 621. 95 
242, 775. 42 
6, 923. 12 



24. 127. 96 



TOTAL LIABILITIES fa RESERVES 



1 , 240, 842. 54 



119 



SCHEDULE OF SHORT TERM LOANS 



Temporary Loans in Anticipation 
of Tax Collections 



Balance 
as at 
1/1/61 



Added 
during 
1961 

900, 000. 00 



Paid off 
during 
1961 

900, 000. 00 



Balance s 
as at 
12/31/61 



Temporary Loans in Anticipation 
of Reimbursement (Highways) 



38, 700. 00 



63, 325. 00 



38. 700. 00 



63, 325. 00 



Temporary Loans in Anticipation 
of Serial Issues/Bonds 



400,000.00 400.000.00 



TOTALS 



38,700.00 1,363,325.00 1,338,700.00 63,325.00 



COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
USED BY THE ASSESSORS IN SETTING THE 1961 TAX RATE 
WITH THE ACTUAL RECEIPTS OF THE YEAR - 12/31/61 



Used by the 
Assessors on 
the 1961 Rate 



Actual 
1961 
Receipts 



Receipts 
more t han 
E stimated 



Receipts 
less than 
E stimated 



Income Tax 


173, 613. 


67 


172, 


004. 


66 








1 


609. 


01 


Corporation Tax 


22, 105. 


78 


25, 


125. 


00 


3, 


019. 


22 








Reimbursements Publicly Owned Land 


69. 


35 




69. 


35 














Old Age Meal Tax 


3, 299. 


69 


3, 


623. 


78 




324. 


09 








Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 


152, 600. 


00 


210, 


202. 


48 


57, 602. 


48 








Licenses 


4, 000. 


00 


4, 


000. 


00 














Special Assessments (Street Betterments) 


3, 600. 


00 


2, 


386. 


42 








1 


213. 


58 


General Government 


5, 100. 


00 


4, 


735. 


40 










364. 


60 


Protection of Persons & Property 


4, 200. 


00 


3, 


981. 


50 










218 


50 


Health & Sanitation 


3, 000. 


00 


2, 


223. 


43 










776. 


57 


Charities (Other than Grants) 


19, 800. 


00 


37, 


255. 


90 


17. 


455. 


90 








Old Age Assistance (Other than Fed. Grants) 


37, 800. 


00 


21, 


255. 


62 








16 


544. 


38 


Veterans Services 


8, 700. 


00 


20, 


494. 


10 


1 1. 


794. 


10 








Schools (Income Tax not Included) 


63, 411. 


45 


45, 


594. 


79 








17 


816. 


66 


Librarie s 


900. 


00 


3, 


708. 


10 


2, 


808. 


10 








Cemeteries 


3, 700. 


00 


4, 


133. 


25 




433. 


25 








Interests 


6, 700. 


00 


6. 


540. 


40 










159. 


60 


School Construction Reimb. (State) 


100, 123. 


99 


110, 


845. 


00 


10, 


721. 


01 








Farm Animal Excise Tax 


195. 


00 




263. 


35 




68. 


35 








Unclassified 


7, 600. 


00 


2, 


121. 


95 








5, 


478. 


05 


Sewer Rental 


15, 000. 


00 


14, 


014. 


94 










985. 


06 


Insurance Claims & Dividends 






14, 


582. 


49 


14. 


582. 


49 








Contractor's Forfeited Bid 






2, 


800. 


00 


2, 


800. 


00 








TOTALS 


635, 518. 


93 


711, 


961. 


91 


121 , 


608. 


99 


45, 166. 


01 



120 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING 1961 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 

Selectmen, Board of: 
Salary, Clerk 

Rent & Town Meeting Expenses 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Printing & Advertising 
Legal Fees 
Travel Allowances 
Supplies, Office 

Elections: 
Wages, Workers 
Meals, Workers 
Supplies, Department 

Registrar of Voters: 
Salaries, Registrars 
Salaries, Clerk 
Salaries, Clerical 
Printing 

Services, Census 
Supplies, Office 

Finance Committee: 
Services, Clerical 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Printing 
Advertising 
P ostage 

Town Manager: 
Salary, Administrative 
Salary, Secretary 
Dues &t Subscriptions 
Printing & Advertising 
Travel Allowances 
Repairs, Office Equipment 
Supplies, Office 
Supplies, Library 

Industrial Account: 

Dues 

Printing 

Advertising 

Travel Allowances 

Supplies, Office 

Town Accountant: 
Salary, Administrative 
Salary, Clerical 
Rent, Office Equipment 
Dues 

Travel Allowances 

Supplies, Office 

Outlay, Office Equipment 



Town Treasurer: 



600. 


00 


Salary, Administrative 


5. 200. 


00 




f\ a 
VO 


Salary, Clerical 


111. 


75 


60. 


00 


Dues 


8. 


00 


142. 


50 


Legal Fees 


130. 


90 


1 , 553. 


1 2 


Recording Fees 


52. 


00 


322 . 


30 


Repairs, Office Equipment 


27. 


00 


1 3. 


05 


Supplies, Office 


582. 


20 


J, d ly). 


no 


Town Collector: 


Z 111 

6, 111. 


85 


AC C 


o n 
oU 


Salary, Administrative 


5, 200. 


00 


20. 


95 


Services, Deputy Collector 


100. 


00 


317. 


54 


Dues 


8. 


00 


795. 


29 


Binding 


76. 


50 






Advertising 


76. 


50 


600. 


00 


Legal Fees 


125. 


00 


200. 


00 


Recording Fees 


204. 


00 


330. 


50 


Supplies, Office 


1 , 040. 


80 


277. 


10 




6,830. 


80 


1 Q 1 
1 , £,0 1 . 


1 U 


1 own Clerk: 






4. 


90 


Salary, Administrative 


4, 732. 


00 


2, 693. 


60 


Dues 


7. 


50 






Repairs, Office Equipment 


4. 


95 


25. 


00 


Supplies, Office 


226. 


1 3 


63. 


50 




4, 970. 


58 


190. 


00 


Assessors: 






15. 


00 


Salary, Administrative 


5, 824. 


00 


182. 


60 


Salary, Office 


6, 240. 


00 


476. 


10 


Dues & Subscriptions 


52. 


00 






Binding 


37. 


38 


11. 500. 


00 


Recording Fees 


21 


20 


4, 600. 


00 


Travel Allowances 


650. 


28 


70. 


00 


Repairs, Office Equipment 


42. 


25 


15. 


00 


Supplies, Office 


442. 


94 


300. 


00 


Outlay, Office Equipment 


490 


70 


39. 


50 




13, 800. 


75 


149. 


1 5 


Town Counsel: 






83. 


00 


Retainer 


1 , 400. 


00 


16, 756. 


65 


Legal Fees 


1, 995. 


00 






Recording Fees & Costs 


55. 


00 


75. 


00 


Suppli e s , Of f i c e 


50. 


00 


t. 7 7 ■ 






3 500 


on 


51. 
461. 

94. 
982. 


97 
70 
62 
69 


Planning Board: 
Salary, Clerical 
Dues 

Advertising 


168. 
40. 
88. 


00 
00 
75 


6, 240 
866 
174 


00 
40 
00 


Recording Fees 
Supplies, Office 


43. 
58. 
398. 


10 
79 
64 


7 


00 








25 


00 








123 


00 








410 


00 








7,845 


00 


121 







REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING 1961 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



Town Hall: 






Salaries Office 


^ i Ci J D 


\J o 


Salaries, Janitor 


1 , 900. 


00 


Postage 


2, 029 


33 


Electricity 


7fl^ 

t \j -} 


1 4 


Telephone 


1, 733. 


15 


Water 


24 


00 


Repairs, Office Equipment 


524 


37 


Repairs, Building 


183. 


10 


Supplies, Office 


523. 


01 


Supplies, Janitor 


40. 


98 


Supplies, Fuel 


499. 


56 


Supplies, Plant 


274. 


85 


Outlay, Equipment 


422. 


75 


Outlay, Major Repairs 


132. 


00 




15. 223. 


32 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY: 



Police Department: 






Salary, 


Admini str ative 


6, 760. 


00 


Salary, 


Sergeants 


24, 192. 


00 


Salary, 


Patrolmen 


55, 884. 


00 


Salary, 


Vacation & Paid Holidays 


6, 824. 


00 


Salary, 


Traffic Supervisors 


6, 567. 


50 


Salary, 


Extra Detail & Sick Leave 


3.919. 


10 


Salary, 


Matrons 


79. 


00 


Salary, 


Clerk 


1. 560. 


00 


Dues & Subscriptions 


13. 


00 


Postage 




40. 


75 


Travel Allowance 


600. 


00 


Prisoner Feeding & Meals 


20. 


00 


Repair s 


Radios 


343. 


57 


Repairs 


Dept. Eqmpment 


25. 


00 


Repair s 


Clothes & Linen 


10. 


00 


Repairs 


Crui ser s 


1. 357. 


80 


Supplies 


, Office 


294. 


86 


Supplies 


, Library 


49. 


00 


Supplies 


, Uniforms 


1, 246. 


40 


Supplies 


, Rubberwear 


50. 


00 


Supplies 


, Department 


352. 


26 


Supplie s 


, Gas & Oil 


3. 182. 


33 


Supplies 


, Tires & Tubes 


328. 


81 


Supplies 


, Batteries 


28. 


56 


Supplie s 


, Ammunition 


64. 


64 


Supplies 


, Medical & First Aid 


12. 


00 


Equip. New Police Station 


191. 


25 


Outlay, 


New Cruisers 


2, 494. 


16 






116, 489. 


99 



Police Station Maintenance: 

Wages, Janitor 

Electricity 

Telephone 

Water 

Building Repairs 

Supplies, Janitor 

Fuel, Heat 

Supplies, Plant 

Hot Top Police Grounds 

Fire Department: 
Salary, Administrative 
Salary, Lieutenants 
Salary, Firemen 
Salary, Vacation Help 
Salary, Call Firemen 
Salary, Sick Leave & Fill In 
Salary, Paid Holidays 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Postage 

Travel Allowances 
Meals 

Repairs, Radios 

Repairs, Dept. Eqmpment 

Fire Alarm Maintenance 

Repairs, Vehicles 

Suppli e s , Of f ic e 

Supplies, Uniforms 

Supplies, Rubberwear 

Supplies, Small Tools & Equipment 

Supplies, Firefighting 

Supplies, Gas & Oil 

Supplies, Tires & Tubes 

Supplies, Vehicles 

Care of Grounds 

Supplies, Medical & First Aid 

Supplies, Flashlights & Batteries 

Outlay, Radios 

Outlay. Firefighting Equipment 
Fire Alarm Extension 

Ambulance: 



Wages. Drivers 
Laundry & Cleaning 
Repairs, Vehicle 
Gas & Oil 
Accessories 

Medical & First Aid Supplies 



Constable: 



418. 00 
495. 30 
1,416. 06 
39. 33 
86. 42 
78. 90 
544. 17 
381. 97 
2, 531. 55 
5, 991. 70 

6, 760. 00 
16, 024. 00 
53, 155. 00 
4, 784. 92 
3, 754. 02 
8, 141. 50 
2, 645. 80 
15. 00 
4. 85 
600. 00 

24. 00 
1 19. 59 
129. 90 
393. 77 
773. 98 

66. 83 
509. 85 
304. 07 
752. 00 
319. 61 
971. 99 
165. 86 
1 15. 97 

25. 42 
34. 89 
96. 50 

547. 95 

1, 984. 59 

2, 276. 53 
105, 498. 39 

1, 305. 72 

38. 15 
874. 30 
301. 99 

24. 41 

25. 45 

2, 570. 02 

100. 00 



122 



t 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING 1961 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



Fire Station; 






Tree Dept. (continued): 






Elect ricity 


OO i . 




Supplies, Gas & Oil 


106. 


20 


T ele phone 




Am 


Outlays 


235. 


17 


Wate r 


KiC . 


Q "X 

yj 




7, 233. 


61 




Lt O . 


nci 
uu 


JJutcn jLim: 






r\cpc±irS, lAeitllO OcLstr OtctLlOn 




78 
1 o 


oaiaries, tree Workers 


7, 351. 


80 


Supplies, Janitor 


Ill 


D9 


Repairs, Equipment 


33. 


80 


Supplies, Fuel 




1 A 
1 D 


Supplies, Dept. 


129. 


00 


Supplies, Building 


AAA 


Q 1 

9 1 


Supplies, Chemicals 


3, 368. 


25 


Outlay, Ec^uipment Building 


ion 

LyV. 






10, 882. 


o c 

85 


Outlay, Major Repairs 


AA 
J DO. 


1 1 


Gypsy Moth: 








4, oc. 1 . 




Salaries, Tree Workers 


5, 038. 


70 


Civil Defense: 






Dues & Subscriptions 


6. 


90 


Telephone 


OCA 


Aq 


Electricity 


10. 


80 


Communication 


O A 


c r\ 
DU 


Repairs, Equipment 


94. 


1 1 


Travel Allowances 




oO 


Supplies, Chemicals 


300. 


00 


Supplies, Office 


1 Q 

lo. 


Arv 

oO 




5, 450. 


5 1 


Supplies, Department 


1 , 087 . 


23 


T own Fore st: 






Supplies, Departmental Training 


n A 

9d. 


00 


Wages 


199. 


80 




1 "7 Q "3 


o 1 


Mosquito Control 


975. 


50 


Dog Officer: 








1 , 175. 


30 


Service s 


480. 


00 


Town Engineer: 






Travel Allowance 


360. 


00 


Salary, Administrative 


7, 499. 


96 


Housing for Animals 


360. 


00 


Wages, Engineer's Asst. 


4, 234. 


00 


Disposal of Dogs 


388. 


00 


Due s 


8. 


00 




1 coo 

1 , 588 . 


00 


Recording Fees 


7. 


80 


Building Inspector: 






Supplies, Office 


211. 


25 


Salary, Administrative 


D, VoU. 


uu 


bupplies, i^ibrary 


Id. 


00 


Services, Clerical 


590. 


70 


Small Tools & Equipment 


76. 


81 


Electrical Fees 


807. 


50 




12, 053. 


82 


Plumbing Fees 


coo 

58^ . 


A A 

00 


Street Betterments: 






Due s 


A C 

4d. 


00 


Salarie s 


932. 


85 


Printing 


iiZ i . 


A A 

00 


Equipment Rental 


260. 


00 


Travel Allowance 


600. 


00 


Recordings & Contractual Services 


13. 


20 


Supplies, Office 


1 49 . 


80 


Supplies, Construction 


1, 562. 


69 




8, 978. 


00 




2. 768. 


74 


Board of Appeals: 






Highway Department: 






Salary, Clerical 


129. 


10 


Salaries & Wages 


48, 256. 30 


Advertising 


4. 


04 


Rent, Equipment 


6. 533. 


08 


Supplies, Office 


2 1 . 


50 


Electricity 


421. 


34 




1 55. 


24 


Telephone 


257. 


34 


C T TIT • 1 J. O "k f 

Sealer Weights & Measures: 






Water 


30. 


23 


Salary, Administrative 


cr\t\ 

bUU. 


A A 
00 


Meals 


10. 


00 


Supplies, Department 


40. 


20 


Garage Maintenance 


295. 


89 




540. 


20 


Supplies, Office 


37. 


51 


Tree Warden: 






weeu & ijrusn xs.iiier 


435. 


60 


Salary, Administrative 


5, 720. 


00 


Rubberwear 


32. 


85 


Dues 


11. 


00 


Fuel, Heat 


2, 203. 


21 


Electricity 


10. 


46 


Small Tools & Equipment 


941. 


92 


Telephone 


96. 


05 


Lumber 


214. 


12 


Travel Allowances 


563. 


80 


Paints, etc. 


171. 


81 


Repairs, Equipment 


186. 


31 


Hardware 


21. 


29 


Repairs, Vehicles 


99. 


01 


Sand, Gravel & Stone 


1. 155. 


36 


Supplies, Dept. 


50. 


18 


Patch 


3. 170. 


28 


Supplies, Trees & Shrubs 


155. 43 


Plant Mix 


1, 416. 


50 



123 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING 1961 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



Highway Department (continued): 






Snow & Ice Removal: 






Tar & Road Oils 


2, 221. 


17 


Salaries & Wages 


14, 518. 


40 


Culverts & Catch Basins 


764. 


83 


Rent, Equipment 


10, 810. 


00 


Fences & Signs 


422. 


40 


Meals, Workers 


430. 


00 


Granite Curbing 


7, 225. 


08 


Repairs, Equipment 


3, 478. 


55 


Flashlights & Batteries 


5. 


83 


Services, Weather Control 


240. 


00 


Outlay, Mech. Equipment 


479. 


59 


Small Tools & Equipment 


1, 461. 


03 




76, 723. 


52 


Salt & Sand 


8,411. 


02 


Road Machinery: 






Gas & Oil 


1 , 631. 


72 


Repairs, Equipment 


9, 183. 


96 


Tires & Tubes 


353. 


71 


Gas & Oil 


6, 150. 


92 


Outlay, Equipment 


1 , 400. 


00 


Tires & Tubes 


432. 


49 




42, 734. 


43 


Diesel Oil 


123. 


65 


Parks: 






Outlay, Road Machinery 


1, 849. 


30 


Wages, Maint. of Grounds 


872. 


10 




17, 740. 


32 


Wages, Police Duty 


948. 


58 


Chapter 90 Const. I960: 






Electricity 


18. 


40 


Salary & Wages 


4, 398. 


95 


Water 


16. 


00 


Rent, Equipment 


8, 986. 


25 


Supplies, Equipment 


224. 


09 


Supplies, Construction 


7, 271. 


27 


Maint. of Grounds & Fences 


964. 


94 




20, 656. 


47 


Outlay, Improvements 


1 , 478. 


57 


Chapter 90 Const. 1961: 






Outlay, Beach Equipment 


132. 


00 


Salary & Wages 


1,315. 


75 




4, 654. 


68 


Supplies, Construction 


20, 407. 


1 1 


Cemetery Department: 








21, 722. 


86 


Wages 


21, 828 


45 


Chapter 90 Maint. 1961: 






Postage 


10. 


00 


Salary & Wages 


296. 


10 


Electricity 


29. 


70 


Sand, Gravel & Stone 


12. 


60 


Telephone 


177 


00 


Patch 


4, 161. 


59 


Water 


520. 


59 


Supplies, Construction 


27. 


90 


Mileage Allowance 


99. 


92 




4, 498. 


19 


Repairs, Equipment 


562. 


40 


Chapter 81 Maintenance: 






Repairs, Vehicles 


288. 


73 


Salary & Wages 


8, 927. 


10 


Fuel, Heat 


129 


92 


Rent, Equipment 


445. 


75 


Supplies, Dept. 


313. 


60 


Sand Gravel Rr .Stonf* 


7, 182. 


18 


C on st nif t i on Siioolif* ^ 


1 , 007 


28 


Patch 


178. 


54 


Flowers, Shrubs & Bulbs 


55. 


00 


Road Oil's 




Do 




711. 


50 


Culverts & Catch Basins 


145. 


85 


Gas & Oil 


304. 


17 




30, 521. 


73 


Supplies, Liners 


1. 056 


84 


Construction of Carolyn Road: 






Hot Top avenues 


4, 198 


87 


Salary & Wages 


1,611. 


70 


Outlay, lawnmower 


1, 383. 


20 


Equipment Rental 


240. 


00 




32, 677 


17 


Sand, Gravel & Stone 


167. 


52 


WATER DEPARTMENT: 






Tar & Road Oils 


1, 777 


64 










3. 796 


86 


Water Betterments 1961 


7, 723. 


02 


Relocate Section Boutwell Street 


18, 229. 


14 


Develop Additional Well Fields 


28, 651. 


59 


Public Street Lights 


15,949. 


97 


Outlay, Front End Loader 


16. 487. 


35 


Install Traffic Control Light 


2, 549. 


00 


Public Sewer Mains 


1,833. 


50 


HobsonAve. Drainage 


1, 310. 


43 


Water, Maintenance: 












Tools & Equipment 


4, 083. 


82 


Powder House Circle Drainage 


1, 455. 


76 


Utilities 


5, 783. 


99 








Pipes & Fittings 


15, 254. 


26 








Brass Goods 


726. 


03 



124 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING 1961 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



Water, Maintenance (continued): 



Maintenance 


8, 247. 


08 


Equipment & Supplies 


2, 300. 


89 


Development 


1, 573. 


00 


Office Supplies & Equipment 


1, 482. 


05 


Meters & Meter Parts 


5, 844. 


84 


Superintendent's expenses 


599. 


63 


System Maintenance 


65, 21 1. 


46 




Ill, 107. 


05 


HEALTH & SANITATION: 






Health & Sanitation: 






Salary, Administration 


6, 935. 


00 


Salary, Clerical 


842. 


70 


Services, Constable 


8. 


50 


Salary, Nurse 


4, 420. 


00 


Salary, Substitute Nurse 


100. 


00 


Salary, Medical Agent 


700. 


00 


Salary, Animal Inspector 


250. 


00 


Dues 


34. 


00 


Printing 


68. 


00 


Advertising 


133. 


00 


Postage 


5. 


99 


Recording Fees 


10. 


04 


Mileage Allowances 


1, 257. 


00 


Legal Fees 


700. 


00 


Disposal of Animals 


150. 


00 


Expenses, Animal Inspector 


50. 


00 


Supplies, Office 


152. 


31 


Supplies, Medical 


59. 


45 


Health Laboratory 


351. 


15 


Hospitalization 


689. 


86 


Immunization Clinics 


67. 


97 


Anti -Rabies Clinic 


396. 


05 


Polio Clinic 


415. 


76 




17, 796. 


78 


Garbage Collection 


8, 950. 


08 


Town Dump 


15, 500. 


00 


CHARITIES & SOLDIERS BENEFITS: 






Welfare Administration: 






Welfare Administration 


5, 838. 


20 


Rent, Quarters 


439. 


20 


Dues 


42. 


00 


Postage 


226. 


48 


Telephone 


224. 


25 


Legal Fees 


709. 


52 


Meals 


3. 


00 


Supplies, Vehicles 


38. 


91 


Repairs, Office Eqmpment 


6. 


00 


Repairs, Vehicles 


62. 


02 



Welfare, Administration (continued) 



Contractual Services 


10. 


00 


Supplies, Office 


788. 


24 


Supplies, Department 


2. 


88 




8, 390. 


70 


Welfare Aid 


6, 850. 


48 


Aid to Dependent Children 


15, 266. 


45 


Old Age Assistance 


30, 371. 


90 


Disability Assistance 


9. 667. 


82 


Medical Assistance for Aged 


34, 353. 


80 


Veterans Benefits: 






Salary, Administrative 


1 , 040. 


00 


Due s 


15. 


00 


Postage 


23. 


84 


Telephone 


56. 


28 


Travel Allowance 


198. 


54 


Supplies, Office 


24. 


52 


Veterans Aid 


42, 498. 


47 




43, 856. 


65 


SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 






EDUCATIONAL & LIBRARY: 






Schools, Educational: 






Salary, Clerk 


300. 


00 


Non-salary Items 


1,110. 


49 


Salaries, Supt. Office 


19, 908. 


26 


Non-salary items, Supt. 


1, 962. 


37 


Salaries, Child Accounting 


1 , 800. 


00 


Salaries, Directors & Supervisors 


39. 133. 


36 


Salaries, High School 


329, 232. 


88 


H.S. Texts & Inst. Aids 


12, 713. 


96 


H. S. Stationery & Supplies 


16, 811. 


10 


Salaries, Elementary School 


400, 654. 90 


Elem. Texts & Inst. Aids 


10, 141. 


41 


Elem. Stationery & Supplies 


10, 677. 


1 5 


Salaries, Substitutes 


9, 034. 


50 


Salaries, Evening School 


6, 668. 


43 


Salaries, Physicians 


1, 500. 


00 


Salaries, School Nurses 


7, 783. 


36 


Health Supplies 


402. 


16 


Mental Health Clinic 


998. 


37 


Utilities, H. S. 


7, 069. 


09 


Utilities, Elementary 


11, 570. 


73 


Bus Transportation 


23, 962. 


41 


Taxi 


1,610. 


00 


Athletic Transportation 


1, 641. 


67 


Out of State Travel 


507. 


50 


Libraries 


4, 402. 


01 



125 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING 1961 FROM APPROPRIATION 



Schools, Educational (continued) 






Public Library: 






Physical Education & Athletics 


4, 898. 


57 


Salary, Librarian 


3.999. 


96 


Salary, Cafeteria Supervisors 


3,900. 


00 


Wages, Asst. Librarian 


1, 680. 


00 


Cafeteria, Non Salary Itenns 


3, 798. 


36 


Wages, Vacation Substitutes 


32. 


00 


Special Education Tuition 


1, 149. 


37 


Wages, Janitor 


420. 


on 


Educational T. V. 


875. 20 


Services, Clerical 


862. 




Outlay, New Equipment 






Dues 




00 ' 




945, 108. 


15 


Binding 


51. 


70 '■ 








Electricity 


222 


65f 


Construction Boutwell St. School 


48 , 390. 


09 


Telephone 


89. 


86^ 








Water 


24 


°% 


Additions &; Alterations Jr/Sr. 






Repairs, Building 


140 


63*^ 


High School Building 


10, 79 1 . 


1 4 


Office Supplies 


470 


52 








Supplies, Books 


6, 001 


88 


Construction Glen Road School 


4, 276. 


59 


Supplies, Fuel Oil 


189. 


20 








Major Repairs, Building 


979 


03 


Construction Wildwood School 


2, 300. 


00 




15, 164 


62 








Recreation: 






North Intermediate School 


574, 200. 


44 


Salary, Director 


850. 


00 








Wages, Supervisors 


6, 142. 


00 


School Operating Plants: 






Utilities 


62. 


14 


H. S. Janitors Salaries 


25, 605. 


"7 A 

74 


Office Supplies 


18 


25 


H. S. Wages, Extra Help 


1, 747. 


42 


First Aid Supplies 


48 


02 


H. S. Repairs, Building 


3 , 472. 


40 


Playground & Beach Supplies 


198 


91 


H. S. Window Cleaning 


600. 


00 


Prize Awards 


131 


00 


H. S. Janitor Supplies 


44. 


70 




7, 450 


32 


H. S. Fuel 


8, 342. 


99 


Bonds &: Insurance: 






H. S. Plant Supplies 


3,519. 


63 


Bonds 


586 


27 ! 


H. S. Major Repairs 


5, 504. 


20 


Workmen's Comp. & P/L 


8, 511. 


02 


Elem. Salaries, Janitors 


41 , 601. 


75 


Public Liability Vehicles 


5, 998 


06 


Elem. Wages, Extra Help 


988. 


02 


Fire, Theft Vehicles 


338. 


58 I 


Elem. Repairs, Building 


4, 52 1 . 


ob 


Engineer's Equipment 


39. 


73 


Elem. Window Cleaning 


616. 


50 


Police & Fire Department 


1, 609. 


SO 


Elem. Janitor Supplies 


29 1. 


60 


Boiler Insurance 


456. 


51 


Elem. Fuel 


14, 925. 


74 


Fire & Ext. Coverage Buildings 


2, 235. 


02 


Elem. Plant Supplies 


5, 045. 


97 


Musical Inst. & Cameras 


1 14. 


31 


Elem. Major Repairs 


20, 198. 


17 


Money & Securities 


230. 


72 


Salary, Administrative 


6, 240. 


00 




20, 120. 


02 


Salaries, Maintenance Help 


10, 560. 


00 


Interest: 






Telephone, Shop 


106. 


65 


Water Bonds 


8, 025. 


25 


Repairs, Shop Equipment 


179. 


92 


Anticipation Notes 


8, 029. 


54 


Repairs, Vehicle 


333. 


74 


Anticipation of Serial Issue 


1. 040. 


73 


Small Tools & Equipment 


467. 


63 


Fire /Police Building 


618. 


75 


Supplies, Repairs 


474. 


41 


School Loans 


73,867. 


50 


was v^ii 


146. 


48 


Street Construction Bonds 


1 QQH 


00 


Outlay, Shop Machinery 


131. 


25 


Public Sewer Bonds 


2, 432. 


00 


Wages, School Grounds Maint. 


9, 564. 


45 


Police Building & Highway Garage 


4, 032. 


00 


Care of School Grounds 


3, 316. 


07 


Auth. & Prep, of Bonds 


3, 350. 


00 




168, 647. 


08 




103. 393. 


77 


Vocational Training: 






Maturing Debt: 






Travel Reimbursements 


571. 


50 


Water Bonds 


47, 000. 


00 


Tuition Fees 


4, 164. 


31 


Fire /Police Bonds 


5, 000. 


00 




4, 735. 


81 


School Bonds 


200, 000. 


00 








Street Construction Bonds 


18. 000 


00 



126 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING 1961 FROM APPROPRIATION 



Maturing Debt (continued) 



Public Sewer Mains 


15, 000. 


00 


Police Building & Highway Garage 


14, 000. 


00 




299, 000. 


00 


Unclassified: 






Training & Conferences 


1, 190. 


31 


Town Report 


1, 846. 


95 


Tax Title & Legal Assistance 


490. 


60 


Town Clock Repairs 


60. 


00 


Unpaid Bills of previous years 


1. 926. 


05 


Reserve Fund 


12, 991. 


98 


Memorial Day 


1, 000. 


00 


Lease of Quarters 


2, 250. 


00 


4-H Town Committee 


100. 


00 


Construct & Equip New Police /Fire Bldg. 


40. 


00 


Construct New Police Station 


75. 


00 



1 




Middlesex County National Bank 
"Drive- in -Teller" 



But the more important task of policy making rests in an identical number of unpaid volunteer citizens. 
They make up the various boards and committees of the town, such as the Board of Selectmen, School 
Committee, Finance Committee, Planning Board, Board of Appeals, Board of Health, Board of Water 
Commissioners, Bd. of Public Welfare, Recreation Commission, Library Trustees and Per sonnel Board 

These participating citizens act only out of interest for the community at large. How active they have 
been, and how effective has been their action, may be determined from these additional accomplishments 
in the past decade, - while maintaining a fairly stable tax rate. 

Since 1953 citizen committees have supervised construction of three new primary schools, an intermedi- 
ate school, and two major high school additions, in what is a ten-school, ten year, $10, 000, 000 program 
In addition, citizen groups are now viewing additional school sites. The school authorities do not build 
these schools. The citizen volunteers do. When completed, the schools are turned over to the educators 

Since 1952 Wilmington has boasted the most impressive record of industrial growth in Massachusetts. 
Job opportunities increased from 170 to over 3000. Industries increased from six (6) to twenty (20). 
Assessed industrial valuation mounted from $100, 000 to $6, 250, 000. 

In the first five months of 1961, the Mass. Department of Commerce reported, ten per cent of total 
industrial building in the Commonwealth was within Wilmington. Five new selective industries have con- 
structed in Wilmington this year. That many more have indicated intent to do so. This did not happen 
by accident, either. Some were attracted to Wilmington by residents acting on their own initiative. 

Paving the way for this industrial growth was the preparation, also by citizen volunteers, with the aid 
of consultants, of exacting zoning regulations. Exercised by the Planning and Appeals Boards, and 
Board of Health, these regulations are the basic factors in the development, physically, of Wilmington 
as a balanced community in which its people may live and work. 

Wilmington recently built a model community for its aged citizens and has taken an enlightened view 
towards its juveniles and their problems. The town is the skating center of the East. One of its skating 
club members is the United States and North American Women's Speed Skating Champion. Miss Jean 
Ashworth is now in Europe studying continental skating methods in preparation for the 1964 Olympics. 
Her fellow citizens helped to send her there. The young boys and girls of the town are so busy emulating 
her, they have little time or opportunity for delinquency. 

Wilmington, unlike most communities in the Metropolitan Boston area, has its own water system; and 
has inaugurated and is about to extend sewerage. These twin multi-million dollar programs were 
fostered, not merely by the administration of the town, but by far-seeing citizen advisors. For example, 
the town recently opened a new wellfield productive of 1, 500, 000 gallons per day. When the proposal 
was first presented by the Water Commissioners, it was turned down at town meeting. A few months 
later, it was accepted unanimously. 

What happened in between demonstrates the power and force of citizen participation. A committee made 
a point of calling on citizen organizations in the community, explaining the advantages of unlimited 
water for home and industrial use, especially when one industry, Avco Research and Advanced Develop- 
ment, utilizes 500,000 gallons daily. The result was inevitable. Complete understanding won complete 
approval. 

In the field of civilian defense a "Wilmington Plan" conceived by town residents is being considered by 
the Congress and Massachusetts Legislature to give tax relief to home owners building fallout shelters 
in their dwellings. 

Recently at the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Association of Finance Committees, a state official 
declared: "If disaster were to wipe out the roster of paid officials and employees, most Massachusetts 
towns could survive. But if the community lost its citizen volunteers, town functions would be dis- 
organized indefinitely. " 

With ten per cent of our residents participating, directly or indirectly in civic affairs, and a growing 
list of volunteers, awaiting appointment to committees, we in Wilmington understand why! 



FIRE ALARM SICNALS 



12 


Main and Church Sts. 




211 


Burlington Ave. and 


3244 


West St. and Suncrest Ave. 


58 


Middlesex Ave. and 


121 


Main St. and 




Harri s St. 


3245 


West St. Reading Line 




North St. 




Middlesex Ave. 


21 12 


Cedar St. and Burt Rd. 


325 


Lowell St. Reading Line 


581 


North St. (Between 


122 


Main and Clark Sts. 


2114 


Cedar St. and Oak Ct. 


41 


Church St. Fire House 




Mi ddlesex Ave. and 


1221 


Washington Ave. 


212 


Burlington Ave. and 


42 


Church and Columbia Sts. 




Dadant Drive) 


1224 


Clark St. and Railroad Ave, 




Chestnut St. 


43 


Church and Beacon Sts. 


59 


Middlesex Ave. and 


123 


Main St. and Bridge Lane 


2122 


Chestnut St. and 


431 


Walker School 




High St. 


1232 


Brand Ave. and Wiser St, 




Butters Row 


432 


Beacon St. and 


591 


High and Woburn Sts. 


1234 


Baker St. and Tapiin Ave. 


2124 


Chestnut St. and Mil! Rd, 




Fai rv ie w Ave. 


592 


Woburn and Park Sts. , 


1236 


Philips Ave. and Wi Id St. 


2125 


Mill Rd. Burlington Line 


433 


Fairview Ave. and 


593 


Park and Gowing Sts. 


124 


Main St. and 


2127 


Chestnut St. and 




Adams St. Ext. 


594 


Pork St. No. Reading 




Massachusetts Ave. 




Hillside Way 


44 


Church and Clark Sts. 


61 


Middlesex Ave. and 


125 


Main and Harnden Sts. 


2128 


Hillside Way Burlington 


441 


Clark St. and 




Salem St. 


1251 


Harnden St. and Glen Rd. 




Line 




Middlesex Ave. 


62 


Salem St. R, R. Cross 


1252 


Glen and Miller Rds. 


2129 


Chestnut St. Woburn Line 


45 


Church SV. and 




(Portland) 


1254 


Glen Rd. and Jones Ave. 


213 


Old Age Housing 




Thurston Ave. 


63 


Salem St. R. R. Cross 


126 


Main St. and Grove Ave. 


2133 


Marion and Clifton Sts. 


46 


Church and Adams Sts. 




(Lawrence) 


1263 


Grove Ave. and Cottage St. 


2136 


Marion St. (Between 


461 


St. Thomas Aux. 


64 


Salem and Cunningharr 


1264 


Mildred Rogers School 




Clifton and Chestnut Sts.) 


462 


Adams St. and 


65 


Salem St. and 


1265 


Grove Ave. and 


214 


Burlington Ave. and 




Adams St. Ext. 




Silver Lake Rd. 




Winchell Rd. 




Boutwell St. 


47 


Senior High School 


651 


McDonald Rd. 


1266 


Grove Ave. and Lake St, 


2141 


Boutwell St. and Taft Rd. 


48 


Church St. and 


67 


Salem St. Tewksbury 


127 


Main and Lake Sts. 


2142 


Boutwell St. and 




Middlesex Ave. 


68 


Salem and Ballordvole 


1273 


Fitz Terr, 




Roosevelt Rd. 


481 


School St. and 


681 


Ballardvale St. (Near 


1274 


Warren Rd. 


215 


Burlington Ave. and 




Jun ior Hi gh Schoo 1 




R. R. Bridge) 


128 


Main St. and Fairfield Rd. 




Swain Rd. 


482 


Buzzell School 


682 


Ballardvale St. (Near 


1283 


Fairfield and Faulkner Rds. 


2151 


Swain and Taft Rds. 


483 


Center School 




Friends Farm) 


129 


Main St. Tev/ksbury Line 


216 


Burlington Ave. and 


51 


Middlesex Ave. and 


683 


Ballardvale St. (Near 


13 


Shawsheen Ave. and 




Beach St. 




Wildwood St. 




Thomas Merely) 




Shawsheen Rd. 


217 


Burlington Ave. and 


511 


Wildwood St. (Near 


684 


Ballardvale St. Andovf 


131 


Shawsheen Ave. and 




Forest St, 




A. S. Hudson) 




Line 




Grand St. 


2171 


Forest St. and Swain Rd. 


512 


Wildwood St. School 


69 


Salem and Andover St! 


1316 


Grand and Birch Sts. 


2173 


Forest St. and Pershing 


513 


Wildwood and Woburn Sts. 


691 


Andover and Woburn S 


132 


Shawsheen and 


231 


Boutwell St. School 


521 


Glendale Circle 


692 


Andover St. Upton Ct. 




Nassau Aves. 


311 


Main and Lowell Sts. 


522 


Glen Rd. R. R. Crossing 


693 


Andover St. (Near 


1324 


Nassau Ave. and Dutton Rd. 


312 


Main St. and Butters Row 


525 


Glen Rd. and King St. 




T. C. Daley) 


133 


Shawsheen Ave. and 


3121 


Butters Row (Between 


5253 


King and Bartlett Sts. 


694 


Andover St. Andover L 




Carter Lone 




Chestnut St, and Main St.) 


526 


Glen Rd. and St. Paul St. 


71 


Salem and Woburn Sts. 


134 


Shawsheen Ave. and 


313 


Memorial Park 


53 


Middlesex Ave. Town Hall 


711 


Woburn St. and 




Aldrich Rd. 


314 


Greer Company 


54 


Middlesex Ave. and 




Hathaway Rd. 


1341 


Aldrich Rd. and Hardin St. 


315 


Main and Fames Sts. 




Federal St. 


714 


Hathaway and 


1343 


Aldrich Rd. and 


3151 


Fames St. R. R. Crossing 


541 


Federal and Concord Sts. 




Sheridan Rds. 




Boutwell St. 


3152 


Raffi & Swanson Co. 


5412 


Concord and Woburn Sts. 


72 


Salem St. Town Dump 


1344 


Aldrich Rd. and Forest St. 


316 


Main St. and Cook Ave. 


5413 


Woburn St. (Near 


73 


Salem St. No. Reading 


1345 


Aldrich Rd. and Winston St. 


317 


Main St. Woburn Line 




A. S. Fames) 






1346 


Aldrich Rd. Billerica Line 


32 


Lowell and Parker Sts. 


5414 


Concord St. No. Reading 






135 


Shawsheen Ave. 


3212 


Parker and Blackstone Sts. 




Line 








Cranberry Bog. 


321 


Lowell and Cross Sts. 


542 


Federal and Grant Sts. 






136 


Shawsheen Ave. and 


322 


L,o w€ II onci Boy Sts* 


544 


Fcdcrol ond Lincoln Sts* 








Bond St. 


3231 


Woburn and Elm Sts. 


546 


Federal and Liberty Sts. 






137 


Shawsheen Ave. and 


3232 


Woburn St. and 


547 


Woburn and Federal Sts. 


2 


All Out 




Hopkins St. 




Brentwood Ave. 


548 


Woburn and West Sts. 


22 


No Schoo 1 


1375 


Hopkins St. Billerica Line 


3233 


Woburn St. and Morse Ave. 


55 


Middlesex and Mystic Aves. 




(7:00 & 7:15 A. M.) 


138 


Shawsheen Ave. and 


3234 


Woburn and Fames Sts. 


56 


C. S. Harriman Tannery 


3 


Special Call 




Nichols St. 


3235 


Woburn St. Woburn Line 


57 


Whitefield School 


4 


Special Call 


1385 


Nichols St. Billerica Line 


324 


Lowell and West Sts. 


571 


Shady Lane Drive and 


7 


Police Call 


139 


Shawsheen Ave. 


3241 


West St. and Westdale Ave. 




Oakdale Rd. 


8 


Boy Scouts 




Billerica Line 


3242 


West and Grove Sts. 


572 


Shady Lane Drive and 


10 


Out of Town 


14 


Unit Packet Corp. 


3243 


Grove St. Reading Line 




Lawrence St. 


666 


Civil Defense 



POLICE 

Numbers 
8-3331 or 8-3332 



AMBULANCE 

Numbers 
8-3200 or 8-3346 



^ FIRE 

Numbers 
8-3200 or 8-3346 



WfFlLS BINDERY INC. 
ALlHAi^i, MhoS. 
MAY 1971